Question Connected PSU wrong. Any chance it’s not safe now even if it tests good?

jlmiller1010

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Jul 30, 2013
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So I’ve been having trouble with my GPU and/or PSU. With my computer suddenly only working with my GPU removed. So I decided to unhook my PSU and test it with a tester. I plugged a 4 pin connector into the wrong slot. As I was plugging it in it sparked between the tester and the 4 pin and the PSU turned off. I then repeated the same blunder with a 6 pin connector labeled VGA.

I eventually figured out what I was doing wrong and got it connected to the tester properly and tested all the cables a couple times. All of the voltages are reading as good, no bad readings at all.

Does this mean the PSU is good/safe still? I‘m very hesitant on putting this PSU back into my system even though it tests fine because of my lack of knowledge on this. If all of the voltages are still reading as good then that means it should be perfectly fine right?
 
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So I’ve been having trouble with my GPU and/or PSU. With my computer suddenly only working with my GPU removed. So I decided to unhook my PSU and test it with a tester. I plugged a 4 pin connector into the wrong slot. As I was plugging it in it sparked between the tester and the 4 pin and the PSU turned off. I then repeated the same blunder with a 6 pin connector labeled VGA.

I eventually figured out what I was doing wrong and got it connected to the tester properly and tested all the cables a couple times. All of the voltages are reading as good, no bad readings at all.

Does this mean the PSU is good/safe still? Or could that spark have damaged a wire not relating to voltages that the tester wouldn’t perceive?

I’m very hesitant on putting this PSU back into my system even though it tests fine because of my lack of knowledge on this.
Which tester did you used?
What kind of tester allows you plug the wrong connector?
If the tester does not display any kind of data (at least voltages for each connection) there is no way to tell.
Could you post your system components (w/model #).
 

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
it depends on the PSU. a quality unit with proper protections should be fine.
a no-name unit that weighs less and a soda can...
I would be more worried about the tester being damaged. try the tester on another PSU if you can just to verify that its working.
 

jlmiller1010

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Jul 30, 2013
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What GPU have you got and what your main PSU watts?
GPU: GTX 970 (soon to be upgraded to 2070 super)
PSU: EVGA supernova B2 850w

The PSU and the 970 have played nice with each other the last 2-3 years until about a week ago when the PC suddenly turned off and wouldn’t turn back on unless I removed the GPU.
 

jlmiller1010

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Jul 30, 2013
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it depends on the PSU. a quality unit with proper protections should be fine.
a no-name unit that weighs less and a soda can...
I would be more worried about the tester being damaged. try the tester on another PSU if you can just to verify that its working.
The tester is working. Once I connected it properly it showed that the psu was giving off all correct voltages.
 

jlmiller1010

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Jul 30, 2013
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Which tester did you used?
What kind of tester allows you plug the wrong connector?
If the tester does not display any kind of data (at least voltages for each connection) there is no way to tell.
Could you post your system components (w/model #).
the psu is a EVGA supernova B2 850w
This was the tester
 
How old is the PSU?
I had plugged burned PSUs on similar testers and the testers shows the PSUs to be in working order.
Some others show inaccurate voltages readings when compared with a multi-meter.
Even though I do not trust that device, connect your PSU to the tester, make sure to connect cables properly.
Take a photo just like the one above and post the photo here.
 

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