[SOLVED] Connecting RGB Fans without onboard RGB header

Jun 26, 2020
4
0
10
0
Hey there, I'm currently working on a Corsair Carbide Series SPEC-DELTA RGB Case, which comes with 3 RGB LED fans.
They connect to the board via 3-pin fan connectors, which is fine, but the lights connect via standard onboard RGB header.
All of them are connected to a single RGB 4-pin plug via included Y-cable. The problem here is, the board I am working with has no RGB header.

Now my question is, how am I going to get those to work?
Since it's a simple RGB connector meant to be plugged into the boards RGB header, wouldn't any cheap RGB controller work?
Here's what's available in my area.

It would be nice to either be able control it with a remote (which doesn't have to be connected via a cable, if possible) or via software, since I do have a free internal USB 2.0 header.

I hope you guys can guide me a bit and help me find a product which isn't overly expensive, maybe even from my provided list.

Cheers! :)
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Ahh. Be careful with rgb plugs. There are multiple differences and too many vendors ignore all that. Some are 5v, some are 12v, some are addressable (ARGB) but are still called RGB, and none work the same.

I'd not bother shopping for a controller until you figure out exactly what you have and what it requires and what kind of controller you'll need.

RGB are amperage controlled, almost like how a 3pin analog fan works, it's a single changeable color, but has limitations according to the supply, just like 3pin fans in a chain or hub.

ARGB are pwm addressable, almost like a 4pin PWM fan, but each individual led is seperately controlled, so can have a rainbow affect that standard RGB lacks. Like a 4pin PWM fan, these are not limited to quantity on supply, as the voltage doesn't change, they are only limited by the strength of the pwm signal.

Many cases that come stock with RGB fans usually have some sort of RGB controller board operated by the reset switch for mode choices etc
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
A Corsair hub is usually the way to go. The iCue software will give you the full RGB options.

One thing to note is that once you start using one RGB ecosystem, it becomes a giant hassle since they're not all interoperable with each other. So without an RGB header on the motherboard as an alternative, you'll want to stay in the Corsair ecosystem for any additional RGB parts that you want to be cooperative. Having three different bits of RGB software can be a nightmare.
 
Jun 26, 2020
4
0
10
0
A Corsair hub is usually the way to go. The iCue software will give you the full RGB options.

One thing to note is that once you start using one RGB ecosystem, it becomes a giant hassle since they're not all interoperable with each other. So without an RGB header on the motherboard as an alternative, you'll want to stay in the Corsair ecosystem for any additional RGB parts that you want to be cooperative. Having three different bits of RGB software can be a nightmare.
Do I really need a Corsair Hub though? The connector should be a common SDM5050 RGB plug since it plugs straight into the board, doesn't that mean any cheap controller would allow control over the LEDs?
I don't think those fans have any Corsair exclusive connector, but I could be wrong...
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Ahh. Be careful with rgb plugs. There are multiple differences and too many vendors ignore all that. Some are 5v, some are 12v, some are addressable (ARGB) but are still called RGB, and none work the same.

I'd not bother shopping for a controller until you figure out exactly what you have and what it requires and what kind of controller you'll need.

RGB are amperage controlled, almost like how a 3pin analog fan works, it's a single changeable color, but has limitations according to the supply, just like 3pin fans in a chain or hub.

ARGB are pwm addressable, almost like a 4pin PWM fan, but each individual led is seperately controlled, so can have a rainbow affect that standard RGB lacks. Like a 4pin PWM fan, these are not limited to quantity on supply, as the voltage doesn't change, they are only limited by the strength of the pwm signal.

Many cases that come stock with RGB fans usually have some sort of RGB controller board operated by the reset switch for mode choices etc
 
Jun 26, 2020
4
0
10
0
Ahh. Be careful with rgb plugs. There are multiple differences and too many vendors ignore all that. Some are 5v, some are 12v, some are addressable (ARGB) but are still called RGB, and none work the same.

I'd not bother shopping for a controller until you figure out exactly what you have and what it requires and what kind of controller you'll need.

RGB are amperage controlled, almost like how a 3pin analog fan works, it's a single changeable color, but has limitations according to the supply, just like 3pin fans in a chain or hub.

ARGB are pwm addressable, almost like a 4pin PWM fan, but each individual led is seperately controlled, so can have a rainbow affect that standard RGB lacks. Like a 4pin PWM fan, these are not limited to quantity on supply, as the voltage doesn't change, they are only limited by the strength of the pwm signal.

Many cases that come stock with RGB fans usually have some sort of RGB controller board operated by the reset switch for mode choices etc
Thanks for the answer, how could I potentially find out what's in there? I cant find any info in the PDF, apart from it being plugged into the boards 12V RGB header...
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY