Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
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I had the problem of windows not installing, but i got into the install slow but good.

now I’m having the problem of 2 constant BSODS when running OSU! Or apex legends (just had watchdog BSOD a minute ago)

when i play osu! Or load my pc with a few applications, after 5 to 10 minutes, it BSODS to
“kmode_exception_not_handled usbxhci.sys”

then after that gets done i reset to boot back in to windows, and it will BSOD to.
“driver irql_less_or_not_equal”

i have looked around and seen that uninstalling USB drivers would help but i havnt tried that yet.
For the usbxhci.sys error.

i have tried to do SFC command and every time it says it found corrupted files but couldn’t repair.
To try and fix this i updated to 21H1. Yet still nothing.

tried to see if praghics drivers were conflicting, but when trying to reinstall it says that there are other instillations running when there arent

i have tried to see if anything is happening between MOBO drivers and others and nothing

have tried to run image repairs, nothing.

i honestly don’t see what’s going on, i don’t see how i have corrupted files, and i don’t see how when watching YouTube it runs fine for more than 20 mins without fault, but once i play OSU! For 5 mins it crashes to the USB error. Or why when i just launch apex it crashes to clock_watchdog_timeout
Which deals with CPU. I have a water cooler and it’s going to low 60s. Please help, i just got back into windows after messing with it for 3 weeks. And i got work to do.

ASUS B550-F
32gb 3200hz vengeance LPX 2x (16x16)
1TB M.2 Samsung EVO PLUS
Gtx 1050 ti 4gb
Ryzen 5 5600x
NZXT water cooler
Thank you!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you by one memory kit with two 16GB DIMMs in it, or did you buy two separate DIMMs of the same model of memory, individually?

Which slots are they installed in? The second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket, or something else?

What is the exact model of your power supply and how long has it been in service?

What BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins at any point?

Is that M.2 drive the only drive installed?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling it? If not, I would do so.

Do you own or have the ability to borrow, a different graphics card for testing purposes?
 

Flyfisherman

Distinguished
May 29, 2012
1,114
4
19,965
239
Ok. Well we need to troubleshoot this.


In Windows 8 and 10, head to Control Panel > Security and Maintenance. In the “Maintenance” section, you’ll be able to check for solutions to existing problems.
If this doesn't workout then we do the next thing:

Download WhoCrashed https://www.resplendence.com/downloads
It doesn't cost you anything if You just follow me:

Run it > top left corner > click Analyze > wait for the report => scroll down to read the information in the crash-dump.
Then post the information as a text file in Your next post.

Best regards from, Sweden
 
Last edited:

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Did you by one memory kit with two 16GB DIMMs in it, or did you buy two separate DIMMs of the same model of memory, individually?

Which slots are they installed in? The second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket, or something else?

What is the exact model of your power supply and how long has it been in service?

What BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins at any point?

Is that M.2 drive the only drive installed?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling it? If not, I would do so.

Do you own or have the ability to borrow, a different graphics card for testing purposes?
PSU is brand new, the ram came in a kit of 2, i just updated the bios to latest service, i have one of my sticks in the first slot from the CPU, and the second on the third slot from the CPU, the CPU is also brand new, and has no bent or missing pins on it, i do have the ability to try a different GPU, the m.2 is the only one installed as of right now, i have not removed and reinstalled it, i will before i download the app the other person mentioned.
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Did you by one memory kit with two 16GB DIMMs in it, or did you buy two separate DIMMs of the same model of memory, individually?

Which slots are they installed in? The second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket, or something else?

What is the exact model of your power supply and how long has it been in service?

What BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins at any point?

Is that M.2 drive the only drive installed?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling it? If not, I would do so.

Do you own or have the ability to borrow, a different graphics card for testing purposes?
Most of everything in my rig is brand new other than GOU and HDD (hvnt replugged it back in yet)
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Ok. Well we need to troubleshoot this.


In Windows 8 and 10, head to Control Panel > Security and Maintenance. In the “Maintenance” section, you’ll be able to check for solutions to existing problems.
If this doesn't workout then we do the next thing:

Download WhoCrashed https://www.resplendence.com/downloads
It doesn't cost you anything if You just follow me:

Run it > top left corner > click Analyze > wait for the report => scroll down to read the information in the crash-dump.
Then post the information as a text file in Your next post.

Best regards from, Sweden
I will do so when i get up from my sleep and helping my dog, had to take home to the emergency vet last night. I will try both for you and CP the dump files for you here shortly, thank you!
 

Mariusglock

Prominent
Jun 13, 2020
126
22
615
8
Some mobos tend to have issues with slot combinations for dual channel, you could try for a quick troubleshooting to change slots to A2 - B2 (2nd and 4th slots from CPU), if that doesnt work, try one memory stick at the time.
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Did you by one memory kit with two 16GB DIMMs in it, or did you buy two separate DIMMs of the same model of memory, individually?

Which slots are they installed in? The second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket, or something else?

What is the exact model of your power supply and how long has it been in service?

What BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins at any point?

Is that M.2 drive the only drive installed?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling it? If not, I would do so.

Do you own or have the ability to borrow, a different graphics card for testing purposes?
Okay so i moved the ram to different spots and played OSU! Again, at first i couldn’t get through a map with out it crashing, now i can play multiple maps and have it not crash, gonna play a little bit more to make sure. Then I’ll try apex and see what that entails
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Did you by one memory kit with two 16GB DIMMs in it, or did you buy two separate DIMMs of the same model of memory, individually?

Which slots are they installed in? The second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket, or something else?

What is the exact model of your power supply and how long has it been in service?

What BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins at any point?

Is that M.2 drive the only drive installed?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling it? If not, I would do so.

Do you own or have the ability to borrow, a different graphics card for testing purposes?
Okay so i launched apex, and it crashed on intro screen, clock_watchdog_timeout
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Ok. Well we need to troubleshoot this.


In Windows 8 and 10, head to Control Panel > Security and Maintenance. In the “Maintenance” section, you’ll be able to check for solutions to existing problems.
If this doesn't workout then we do the next thing:

Download WhoCrashed https://www.resplendence.com/downloads
It doesn't cost you anything if You just follow me:

Run it > top left corner > click Analyze > wait for the report => scroll down to read the information in the crash-dump.
Then post the information as a text file in Your next post.

Best regards from, Sweden
Maintenance says “driver status: All drivers are working properly.
device software : no actions needed
I clicked automatic maintenance to see what will happen. Downloading the app rn
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Ok. Well we need to troubleshoot this.


In Windows 8 and 10, head to Control Panel > Security and Maintenance. In the “Maintenance” section, you’ll be able to check for solutions to existing problems.
If this doesn't workout then we do the next thing:

Download WhoCrashed https://www.resplendence.com/downloads
It doesn't cost you anything if You just follow me:

Run it > top left corner > click Analyze > wait for the report => scroll down to read the information in the crash-dump.
Then post the information as a text file in Your next post.

Best regards from, Sweden
here is that crash dump

Crash dumps are enabled on your computer.

Crash dump directories:
C:\WINDOWS
C:\WINDOWS\Minidump

On Sat 12/18/2021 11:29:55 AM your computer crashed or a problem was reported
crash dump file: C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\121821-6359-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: win32kbase.sys (win32kbase+0x4a2f0)
Bugcheck code: 0x101 (0x10, 0x0, 0xFFFFCC01AEA00180, 0x3)
Error: CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT
file path: C:\WINDOWS\system32\win32kbase.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Base Win32k Kernel Driver
Bug check description: This indicates that an expected clock interrupt on a secondary processor, in a multi-processor system, was not received within the allocated interval. This can be caused by non-responding hardware or by a overheated CPU (thermal issue).
The crash took place in a Microsoft module. The description of the module may give a hint about a non responding device in the system.



On Sat 12/18/2021 11:29:55 AM your computer crashed or a problem was reported
crash dump file: C:\WINDOWS\MEMORY.DMP
This was probably caused by the following module: ks.sys (ks!ksprobestreamirp+0x36d)
Bugcheck code: 0x101 (0x10, 0x0, 0xFFFFCC01AEA00180, 0x3)
Error: CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT
file path: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\ks.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Kernel CSA Library
Bug check description: This indicates that an expected clock interrupt on a secondary processor, in a multi-processor system, was not received within the allocated interval. This can be caused by non-responding hardware or by a overheated CPU (thermal issue).
The crash took place in a Microsoft module. The description of the module may give a hint about a non responding device in the system.



On Sat 12/18/2021 12:01:36 AM your computer crashed or a problem was reported
crash dump file: C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\121821-7562-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: amdppm.sys (amdppm+0x2ec7)
Bugcheck code: 0x101 (0x10, 0x0, 0xFFFF950073200180, 0x3)
Error: CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT
file path: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\amdppm.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Processor Device Driver
Bug check description: This indicates that an expected clock interrupt on a secondary processor, in a multi-processor system, was not received within the allocated interval. This can be caused by non-responding hardware or by a overheated CPU (thermal issue).
The crash took place in a Microsoft module. The description of the module may give a hint about a non responding device in the system.



i dont see how my CPU is over heating when i have a water cooling system in it. should i take it off, re-paste and make sure its connected right? cause if so that is my problem.
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Try out only 1 Ram stick, and see how it goes
the ram stick situation dosnt work, tried both sticks in one at a time in each slot, it didnt help. i think this may be a overheating CPU situation, when i look on the NZXT hub while launching apex, it shoots from 38c (idle) to 64c (loaded) and probably higher, i cant see what exact temp it is cause it crashes the PC, and can only assume its doing that to protect the CPU. im going to look up my model cooler, take it off, re apply thermal past more than correctly, make sure its connected right and what not.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
amazing whocrashed didn't just blame ntoskrnl
everything that crashed is part of windows which isn't exactly helpful
amdppm.sys is part of windows designed to talk to AMD cpu
ks.sys is random, used for video capture.

have you run memtest on any of the sticks to make sure they okay?

how to track temps - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-use-hwinfo-to-track-sensor-values-on-ryzen.3693704/
if you do install HWINFO, can also set it to log sensor scores to see what temps you are getting over time and logs may reveal more info about system that might help others here.
if you want to log, in the sensor window there are icons along bottom. click on the con to the very right of the Clock. it shows "logging start" if you hover mouse over it.
this opens file exploder
it lets you name a log file, save it somewhere you remember and name it something logical

if bsod is random, may need to start logging each start until you get it.
file it creates is a CSV file, can be opened in excel or Google Docs
upload it to a file sharing website and show link

I might as well grab minidumps as well
  1. Open Windows File Explore
  2. Navigate to C:\Windows\Minidump
  3. Copy the mini-dump files out onto your Desktop
  4. Do not use Winzip, use the built in facility in Windows
  5. Select those files on your Desktop, right click them and choose 'Send to' - Compressed (zipped) folder
  6. Upload the zip file to the Cloud (OneDrive, DropBox . . . etc.)
  7. Then post a link here to the zip file, so we can take a look for you . . .
 
Last edited:

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
amazing whocrashed didn't just blame ntoskrnl
everything that crashed is part of windows which isn't exactly helpful
amdppm.sys is part of windows designed to talk to AMD cpu
ks.sys is random, used for video capture.

have you run memtest on any of the sticks to make sure they okay?

how to track temps - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-use-hwinfo-to-track-sensor-values-on-ryzen.3693704/
if you do install HWINFO, can also set it to log sensor scores to see what temps you are getting over time and logs may reveal more info about system that might help others here.
if you want to log, in the sensor window there are icons along bottom. click on the con to the very right of the Clock. it shows "logging start" if you hover mouse over it.
this opens file exploder
it lets you name a log file, save it somewhere you remember and name it something logical

if bsod is random, may need to start logging each start until you get it.
file it creates is a CSV file, can be opened in excel or Google Docs
upload it to a file sharing website and show link

I might as well grab minidumps as well
  1. Open Windows File Explore
  2. Navigate to C:\Windows\Minidump
  3. Copy the mini-dump files out onto your Desktop
  4. Do not use Winzip, use the built in facility in Windows
  5. Select those files on your Desktop, right click them and choose 'Send to' - Compressed (zipped) folder
  6. Upload the zip file to the Cloud (OneDrive, DropBox . . . etc.)
  7. Then post a link here to the zip file, so we can take a look for you . . .
Mem sticks pass with flying colors
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
amazing whocrashed didn't just blame ntoskrnl
everything that crashed is part of windows which isn't exactly helpful
amdppm.sys is part of windows designed to talk to AMD cpu
ks.sys is random, used for video capture.

have you run memtest on any of the sticks to make sure they okay?

how to track temps - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-use-hwinfo-to-track-sensor-values-on-ryzen.3693704/
if you do install HWINFO, can also set it to log sensor scores to see what temps you are getting over time and logs may reveal more info about system that might help others here.
if you want to log, in the sensor window there are icons along bottom. click on the con to the very right of the Clock. it shows "logging start" if you hover mouse over it.
this opens file exploder
it lets you name a log file, save it somewhere you remember and name it something logical

if bsod is random, may need to start logging each start until you get it.
file it creates is a CSV file, can be opened in excel or Google Docs
upload it to a file sharing website and show link

I might as well grab minidumps as well
  1. Open Windows File Explore
  2. Navigate to C:\Windows\Minidump
  3. Copy the mini-dump files out onto your Desktop
  4. Do not use Winzip, use the built in facility in Windows
  5. Select those files on your Desktop, right click them and choose 'Send to' - Compressed (zipped) folder
  6. Upload the zip file to the Cloud (OneDrive, DropBox . . . etc.)
  7. Then post a link here to the zip file, so we can take a look for you . . .
Making lunch, i will get to that here soon, stay posted
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
amazing whocrashed didn't just blame ntoskrnl
everything that crashed is part of windows which isn't exactly helpful
amdppm.sys is part of windows designed to talk to AMD cpu
ks.sys is random, used for video capture.

have you run memtest on any of the sticks to make sure they okay?

how to track temps - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-use-hwinfo-to-track-sensor-values-on-ryzen.3693704/
if you do install HWINFO, can also set it to log sensor scores to see what temps you are getting over time and logs may reveal more info about system that might help others here.
if you want to log, in the sensor window there are icons along bottom. click on the con to the very right of the Clock. it shows "logging start" if you hover mouse over it.
this opens file exploder
it lets you name a log file, save it somewhere you remember and name it something logical

if bsod is random, may need to start logging each start until you get it.
file it creates is a CSV file, can be opened in excel or Google Docs
upload it to a file sharing website and show link

I might as well grab minidumps as well
  1. Open Windows File Explore
  2. Navigate to C:\Windows\Minidump
  3. Copy the mini-dump files out onto your Desktop
  4. Do not use Winzip, use the built in facility in Windows
  5. Select those files on your Desktop, right click them and choose 'Send to' - Compressed (zipped) folder
  6. Upload the zip file to the Cloud (OneDrive, DropBox . . . etc.)
  7. Then post a link here to the zip file, so we can take a look for you . . .
here is the zipped file of minidumps friend! via dropbox


https://www.dropbox.com/s/w0kw3ztyy6ovi64/121821-6500-01.zip?dl=0
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Your memory is installed in the wrong slots. Move them to the second and fourth slots and then try again. Yes, it DOES make a difference. Here is why the manufacturer recommends SPECIFIC memory population rules that need to be followed if you don't want problems.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/why-are-we-putting-ram-sticks-into-2nd-and-4th-slot-first.3195865/post-19720591

After moving them to the correct slots (Which it seems you might have already done) I'd recommend doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows because sometimes after configuration changes many BIOSes remain stuck on some previous hardware settings despite those setting no longer remaining relevant.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



Let me know once you've move them and tested it out.
Mem sticks pass with flying colors
Pass WHAT with flying colors? For how many passes? Here is the proper methodology.


Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory and it is a good idea to run it AGAIN, after enabling the XMP profile to verify that none of the XMP specific profile settings or timings are in disagreement with the motherboard, especially if it is a memory kit that is not already shown to be validated for that board on the memory manufacturer or motherboard manufacturer's compatibility list.
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Your memory is installed in the wrong slots. Move them to the second and fourth slots and then try again. Yes, it DOES make a difference. Here is why the manufacturer recommends SPECIFIC memory population rules that need to be followed if you don't want problems.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/why-are-we-putting-ram-sticks-into-2nd-and-4th-slot-first.3195865/post-19720591

After moving them to the correct slots (Which it seems you might have already done) I'd recommend doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows because sometimes after configuration changes many BIOSes remain stuck on some previous hardware settings despite those setting no longer remaining relevant.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



Let me know once you've move them and tested it out.

Pass WHAT with flying colors? For how many passes? Here is the proper methodology.


Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory and it is a good idea to run it AGAIN, after enabling the XMP profile to verify that none of the XMP specific profile settings or timings are in disagreement with the motherboard, especially if it is a memory kit that is not already shown to be validated for that board on the memory manufacturer or motherboard manufacturer's compatibility list.
memtest passed with 4 passes both sticks
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
memtest passed with 4 passes both sticks
Your memory is installed in the wrong slots. Move them to the second and fourth slots and then try again. Yes, it DOES make a difference. Here is why the manufacturer recommends SPECIFIC memory population rules that need to be followed if you don't want problems.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/why-are-we-putting-ram-sticks-into-2nd-and-4th-slot-first.3195865/post-19720591

After moving them to the correct slots (Which it seems you might have already done) I'd recommend doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows because sometimes after configuration changes many BIOSes remain stuck on some previous hardware settings despite those setting no longer remaining relevant.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



Let me know once you've move them and tested it out.

Pass WHAT with flying colors? For how many passes? Here is the proper methodology.


Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory and it is a good idea to run it AGAIN, after enabling the XMP profile to verify that none of the XMP specific profile settings or timings are in disagreement with the motherboard, especially if it is a memory kit that is not already shown to be validated for that board on the memory manufacturer or motherboard manufacturer's compatibility list.
it only did 4 passes each with no error notif.
 

Gingyfpss

Great
Jul 17, 2021
164
1
85
0
Your memory is installed in the wrong slots. Move them to the second and fourth slots and then try again. Yes, it DOES make a difference. Here is why the manufacturer recommends SPECIFIC memory population rules that need to be followed if you don't want problems.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/why-are-we-putting-ram-sticks-into-2nd-and-4th-slot-first.3195865/post-19720591

After moving them to the correct slots (Which it seems you might have already done) I'd recommend doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows because sometimes after configuration changes many BIOSes remain stuck on some previous hardware settings despite those setting no longer remaining relevant.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



Let me know once you've move them and tested it out.

Pass WHAT with flying colors? For how many passes? Here is the proper methodology.


Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory and it is a good idea to run it AGAIN, after enabling the XMP profile to verify that none of the XMP specific profile settings or timings are in disagreement with the motherboard, especially if it is a memory kit that is not already shown to be validated for that board on the memory manufacturer or motherboard manufacturer's compatibility list.
No significant difference was made other than a new BSOD code “apc index mismatch”
 

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