Discussion Cooling help for i7 12700k

rabidocelot

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I am thinking about upgrading to an i7 12700k with a z690 carbon. My current system (3570k) uses a cooler master hyper 212 but I am thinking I need to upgrade to a NH-D15 Noctua to help with the cooling of the new CPU. I am also considering a liquid cooler but have never used one and I am not sure which one to get. How much energy do liquid coolers use and would it be a problem for my 650w PSU? This is all in a HAF 922. Thanks for any help.

Edit: If someone could also recommend a cooler that would fit the 12 series for 100-150 (doesn't need to be RGB) that would be greatly appreciated.
 
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The NH-D15 should be plenty fine (though I'm presuming it'll fit in the HAF 922).

As for liquid coolers, they don't consume that much power. The pump itself usually uses a SATA connector for power so you're really only looking at as much power as a typical hard drive at worst. While I don't think liquid coolers are that much better than a high-end air cooler, if you're still set on getting one, get something with a radiator that's at least 240mm.
 
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rabidocelot

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The NH-D15 should be plenty fine (though I'm presuming it'll fit in the HAF 922).

As for liquid coolers, they don't consume that much power. The pump itself usually uses a SATA connector for power so you're really only looking at as much power as a typical hard drive at worst. While I don't think liquid coolers are that much better than a high-end air cooler, if you're still set on getting one, get something with a radiator that's at least 240mm.
Thanks for taking the time to reply, I've done some research and it seems it should fit my 922. I just kinda assumed that liquid cooling was far superior to air cooling so that's why I was considering it.
 

Phaaze88

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Liquid does have a greater thermal capacity than air, so yes, the raw performance is there. Unfortunately, these AIOs are like a 50/50 hybrid of liquid and air.
They still need to rely on air for cooling via fans, and that's where the gap between the 2 types of coolers narrows.
You get the advertised performance when you run your fans at 100%, or as close to it as possible. More often than not, that's more doable on air coolers than AIOs.
The fans on AIOs typically are faster and louder. They need to be, as the air resistance presented by the radiator is greater than that of air coolers. Also consider the air resistance presented by the panel the rad is being installed against.
Needless to say, it's more effective to install the radiator against a mesh panel, so as to avoid doubling down on air resistance. Take the front panel of NZXT's H500 series, as a bad example.
The fans on an AIO also serve as chassis fans, and compared to air coolers, play a more direct role in providing cooling to the rest of your hardware, and not just the cpu it is attached to.
 
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