Copper conducts better!

BroHamBone

Distinguished
Jul 21, 2009
354
0
18,810
Hey i have noticed majority of the heatsinks for cooling are aluminum. Now, is there a big difference in temps with a copper and aluminum conductor? At the moment i have a copper thermaltake v1. ive seen the same in aluminum. Anyone have good info on this? Lemm know! Thank you! :hello:
 

ahslan

Distinguished
Aug 23, 2007
941
0
18,990
yup...copper transfers heat better than aluminum...simple as that...thats why copper heatsinks cost more...

usually you can find aluminum heatsinks with copper plating...which helps, but its not the same as being entirely made from copper...
 

overshocked

Distinguished
Feb 14, 2009
1,999
0
19,960
^ Actually you guys are wrong.

The truth is, It is mest to have a copper base and copper heatpipes because it conducts heat better than aluminum.

Copper heat conductivety=401

Aluminum heat conductivity=250

So the common illusion is that a 100% copper HSF whould cool better than an aluminum HSF.

This however is not the case, because we have to look at the specific heat capacity of both of these metals.

Aluminum=.902
copper.....=.375


The ideal heatsink has heat pipes that draw heat away quickly and fins that Dont change temperature quickly.

To cool "efficiently" it must have a high specific heat capacity because the temperature of the fins must not be changed quickly (wich is difficult to do because air doesnt cool very efficiently). Thus a heatsink with aluminum fins and a copper base would cool the best.
 

jonsy2k

Distinguished
Jul 29, 2009
138
0
18,680


QFT

Pure copper heatsinks are expensive because it's more expensive, but that in no way makes them better.

On the other hand, pure copper looks quite nice :)
 
i was under the impression that although copper was able to draw heat better then aluminum it also kept the heat with it making it more difficult to cool the copper hence the combo's etc of copper and aluminum
 

Ancient_1

Distinguished
Oct 18, 2006
319
3
18,815
The two main reasons for the copper aluminum combination over pure copper is cost and weight. At a given weight they can put many more aluminum fins than copper. Back when the heatsinks were smaller there were many more pure copper and all the best were the all copper ones. When the large heatpipe coolers started to appear is when all copper units became too expensive and heavy for the small advantage they had over the hybrids.
 

Conumdrum

Distinguished
Nov 20, 2007
2,397
0
19,960



So are you a Science guy? Geeze your title is just fail, I haven't seen one so stupid in a long long time. Your clueless but a pretty good marketer. Maybe you also can be on TV selling a new toilet cleaner with a stupidly loud voice.

I'm NOT making any effort to help this guy.
 


That's why water cooling with copper contact heat-pipes works so well. Water has one of the highest specific heat of any substance - 4185 joules per gram, so it is great at absorbing a ton of heat.
 

overshocked

Distinguished
Feb 14, 2009
1,999
0
19,960
^ You kinda have it right "BSOD".

The specific heat capacity is how much energy it takes to change the temperature of a substance.

Water is a good cooler because it has a thermal conductivety about 20x that of air.

Sounds good huh?
Wrong.

water has a thermal conductivety of .58

copper has a thermal conductivety of 401


 

cobot

Distinguished
Jun 15, 2008
295
0
18,810
Guys, a "water cooled" system is still being cooled by air.

The water just acts as a replacement for the heat pipes.


The advantage is that you are not limited to the form factor of your case, but instead you can use a huge, very effective radiator outside your compy case.

True, the thermal conductivity of water is quite low compared to copper and alu, however, since the water is constantly pumped around between the radiator and the cpu/gpu/whatever, that is not an issue.

 

BroHamBone

Distinguished
Jul 21, 2009
354
0
18,810




1 thing for this dood...D1KK! Get a life dood and quit being a cyber bully! HAH! thats funny!

Anyway... the reason i posted this thread is to find out about different cooling systems. I am very skeptical on water cooling do to, water being that close to running electronics. I would have to see one to believe it :??: Like i stated, i have a copper HSF right now. But for my new build i was curious about copper pipes/aluminum fins or all copper or all aluminum or H20. With the water its just over my head expensive compared to something that can be cooled by fan and metals. But thanks for the help thus far! It has informed me on what i never knew... oh yea again to Con..... D1KK!
 

jonsy2k

Distinguished
Jul 29, 2009
138
0
18,680



Well technically, pure water does not conduct electricity, as in de-ionized water. The water that we see each day is filled with ions that give it its conductive properties.

Also there are plenty of non conductive liquids that are used for liquid cooling that will not fry your components if they leak.
 

BroHamBone

Distinguished
Jul 21, 2009
354
0
18,810



i will do more research on it before making the decision... there was a thread where the guy unscrewed the pipe connected to the cpu cooler..... and he said it spilled... of course that was his fault for missing some important step in there.. Scary!!! :cry: Lol, but i will keep it in mind for the future. Thanks for the moral boost on my quest!
 

Raviolissimo

Distinguished
Apr 29, 2006
357
0
18,780


good points, but the thermal resistance from fin to air is the largest resistance in the thermal equation, the schematic you would use to model the CPU-interface-heatsinkbase-interface-heatpipe-interface-fin-air transition.

and the transition from fin to air is affected hardly at all by fin material.

 

overshocked

Distinguished
Feb 14, 2009
1,999
0
19,960



I didnt even want to touch on thermal resistance. If i had to start there LOL. [:lectrocrew:6]
 


ya, that's what I meant. The water takes the place of aluminum - lower thermal conductivity but higher specific heat. The water acts as the heatsink to hold the heat for dissipation while the copper acts as the heat conductor.
 

hundredislandsboy

Distinguished
Heat conduction is the flow of internal energy from a region of higher temperature to one of lower temperature by the interaction of the adjacent particles (atoms, molecules, ions, electrons, etc.) in the intervening space.

Factors affecting the rate of heat transfer by conduction.

temperature difference
length
cross-sectional area
material

P = ΔQ = kAΔT
Δt ℓ

Aluminum = good
Copper = better
Silver = best





 
jonsy2k write>Well technically, pure water does not conduct electricity, as in de-ionized water. The water that we see each day is filled with ions that give it its conductive properties.

Also there are plenty of non conductive liquids that are used for liquid cooling that will not fry your components if they leak.

Well, good luck with that as tests have proven that NONE of the selling SO CALLED non conductve cooling liquids ARE actually non conductive.
The only ones that are really non conductive are mineral oil and fluorient, both not suited for watercooling.

I suggest you actually check as much as posible on water cooling so u get a general idea, then post a new thread mayb :D.

And BTW, as far as i know best heat conductor is a diamond, so tell me when someone is crazy enought to actually me those heatsinks :D.