Core 2 Quad overheating, no overclocking...

dlikhten

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My cpu is going up to 80c before i killed all progs on it. I created a simple 4 threaded java program which causes all 4 cores to operate in an infinite loop. The temperature just keeps rising.

I cleaned the cpu and heatsink provided with the cpu and applied Arctic Silver 5 even used the exact instructions given on their website to ensure i got everything down right.

I am running a Intel Core 2 Quad.
The video card vents to the outside of the case.
The case has a giant powerful fan that does 1100 rpm blowing air in, and a smaller fan out front blowing air out. The case goes with intel's specs for how a case should be designed to give optimal ventilation.

The spec is here:
http://arstechnica.com/guides/buyer/guide-200707.ars/2
Except i am using a core 2 quad not a core 2 duo.

I am NOT attempting to overclock, I just need it operational.

When underclocked due to automatic voltage control on the MB, it runs at about 44-53c (1600mhz) when at full load i killed it at 80c.

Anyone got any ideas? BTW the cpu fan easily does 1200 rpm, and goes up to 1800 with no good effect...
 

dlikhten

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Here are some results:
Core temps for each of the core (degrees c)
54 51 47 48 idle
When on full load
90+ 80+ 80+ 80+

I am stumped :(

 

dlikhten

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Sorry I keep forgetting details...

another thing, when i take it off full load temperature drops almost instantaneously to the low readings.
 

dlikhten

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That is always a possibility. Is there a definitive way to confirm this so that I can convince my retailer to exchange it?
 
It clearly seems that your HeatSink/Fan isn't mounted properly. So remove the HSF assembly from over your CPU. Clean the contact surfaces thoroughly with alcohol and a lint-free cloth. Reinstall it properly, with a *little* bit (grain of rice~sized) of high quality thermal grease, like Arctic Silver 5.

How to for the grease: http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm


If you're using the stock Intel HSF, strongly consider replacing it with one of a large number of high quality CPU coolers.

Scott
 

dlikhten

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Thanks for the response Scott...

Those are the exact instructions i used to apply the new thermal paste, as they indicate for quad cores we should apply a small line of thermal paste to touch all 4 cores. I cleaned both the core and sink with 91% rubbing alcohol and a lint-free cloth.

It seems odd that the Intel's stock HSF is so inadequate that it cannot even function at base levels (at least adhering to Intel's spec of max 71c operating temp. I would assume that getting a better sink is good to keep temp down even lower, perhaps noise down (there is none), and better for overclocking purposes, but I just want it to work decently w/o overclocking.

There is always a possibility that the heatsink was not correctly mounted. If anyone has mounted this darn quad core, please tell me the best way to do it, those 4 pins are damn tough to snap in. How did you approach snapping that heatsink in without damage to the motherboard? I am pretty sure that I got the installation down well...
 

cnumartyr

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I hate the snaps.. I never even bothered with the stock cooler, it's barely adequate for the X6800 so I wasn't going to risk it with my quad.

I use the Ultra 120 Extreme.. I doubt you need anything that nuts for just running stock. I would say the best bet is just to get a new CPU cooler.

71 C = TCase which is the temp on the Heat spreader, not the temperature of the cores. The cores won't turn off til 100 C.

My cores were running under 30 C at stock speeds with the Ultra (at idle).

Edit: Also, I didn't apply the AS5 the way they tell you on the site. I applied a very thin line across the die as they show. Then spread it with a credit card until it evenly covered the entire heat spreader and you were unable to see any nickle plating.
 



The Stock HSF is a a PITA to mount, as I learned when I had a Core 2. "Push through, and a quarter turn clockwise" is simple in real terms. But... The best method I've found is to install the thing before mounting the motherboard so you can visually check the little white inserts are fully showing. If they aren't, then it isn't on there right. And as pointed out alread, the stock thing is only *just* adequate. So I ended up replacing it anyhow. So if anyone knows the engineer who designed the OEM mounting system, do us all a favor and shove nut/bolt up his nose and a tube of AS-5 up his..... nevermind.... Barring that, thank him for all hard work and money spent on designing, testing, and producing something worse than a one cent screw. Look him in the eyes and smile when you do it, willya?

I used 'Plan B' for this last (quad) build: Ordered an aftermarket HSF at the same time as the CPU. Never even took the OEM Piece Of S out of the package.
 

dlikhten

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Well, the TCase I had was going over 80c!!! Cores never reached 100c each because i was worried the'd melt so i killed the process causing the heavy load.

Can it be expected for me to run at such high temperatures or am I risking damage to the processor?
 

dlikhten

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Sounds like I should get a cooler :(

I also have a core 2 duo which i need to assemble (same comp worse cpu) should i expect the same thing? Or can I just use the Intel HSF for that, once again i just need it to work...

Other heatsinks don't have the 4 pins???!?!?!?! If thats the case I am all for it... By god i had an AMD heat sink which just lowers a metal piece and snaps it in no if/ands/or how to snap all 4 in. Worst design IMO
 

cnumartyr

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I have a Gigabyte Gpower Lite on my P4 LGA775 thats uses the old Socket 478 mounting design. Just has clips... keeps it around 55C under load. It's not overclocked at all.

The Tuniq/Ultra 120 use screws with a mounting bracket.

As far as with the duo the stock cooler should be fine as long as it's mounted properly. Personally I hate using stock coolers.. I think they all suck. Whenever I order a CPU I order a new HSF with it.
 



A Core 2 should idle in the 30's and should not pass the mid-60's under a torture test. Run it as hot as yours, and it will die. Just a question of when.
 

dlikhten

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cnumartyr thanks for all your help. I may wind up getting that same cooler... It is compatible with the core 2 duo/quad right? It looks like a much better installation than the darn pins used by the quad.

Ill try one more time to get my heatsink properly installed, if that wont work I guess its new heatsink :(
 

cnumartyr

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The Gpower Lite or the Ultra 120?

I have the Ultra 120 on an overclocked (3.0 GHz) Q6600 and I don't see full loads over 55C.
 

cnumartyr

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For the fan I used a Scythe Slip Stream @ 90 CFM for the fan. It's suprisingly quiet.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=w2l9zfIgCms

There is the video of what it looks like in the case... Keep in mind it's massive. What motherboard do you have? There are some compatibility issues due to it's size. Just make sure it'll fit first before buying it.
 

dlikhten

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Holy crap that is one hudge heatsink!!!

I was going to go w/ Ultra 120...

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3R
Case: Coolermaster Centurion 5

 

cnumartyr

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I checked Thermalrights website for ya.. It's 100% compatible with the DS3R. If you are ordering it with some paste.. I'd get MX-2 over Arctic Silver 5. No curing time, supposed to be better on air cooling, non-conductive, and has an 8 year life span.
 

dlikhten

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I mean it looks like my case has the same dimentions (of course i am using your hdd and dvd drive as a basis for comparison...)

This heatsink does not need the clip-on installation?
 

cnumartyr

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No, there is a back plate that has screw posts that come up though the push pin holes. After sitting the heat sink on the processor, you slide a bracket over it and expand it. Then it screws into the posts.

It can be a pain, but you know for a fact you get good contact. Just make sure when installing it you just get one started, dont' get it tight before installing the next one. Get all 4 posts in then finger tighten them in a criss-cross fashion. Then I use 4 full turns of the screw driver (1 at a time on each screw) in a criss-cross fashion. Then check to make sure the heat sink is secure.

It works great for me, I hate the push pin and clip design.. I'm a nuts and bolts kinda guy.
 

dlikhten

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Agreed...

But before I take drastic measures i am going to make one final attempt to secure my processor with my current sink. I just feel like i am going to crack my mobo if i keep trying...
 

cnumartyr

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Try evenly spreading the AS 5 over the entire chip before you place the heat sink on it. A very thin layer spread with something flat like a credit card.

That's how I've always put it on.. I don't like the "mash the heat sink onto it" method. It just seems like you don't get as good contact.
 

dlikhten

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The idea behind that is that you only want contact on the core, so that the heat goes directly to the sink not spreading evenly... in any case i can try that too :) it also can create air bubbles when u spread it, when the sink is added there is nowhere for air to escape.
 

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