Corsair’s Hydro GFX GTX 1080 Is Available Now, But Only From Corsair

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thundervore

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They do it for maximum compatibility. All cases will have a 120mm fan mount somewhere, but some wont have a 140mm mount.

So to maximize profits they go with what they know will cover all cases across the board.
 

thundervore

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The only what I can see this coming into play is if the customer have a poorly ventilated case such as one of the cases with noise dampening and the air flow is terrible so the inside temps get too hot.
 

uglyduckling81

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The Nvidia reference cards do throttle though with those blower style coolers.

The aftermarket ones don't but then they do drop their hot air into the case rather than taking it away like the water cooled ones do.

I agree there isn't much point to it but it does give the advantages of both reference blower designs and the superior cooling of aftermarket solutions. It's a 2 in 1 deal.
 

Tradesman1

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It's something a little different (GB also has a WC 1080 out), apparently they do OC well, saw a review on this at Guru3D last month. They seem happy with it as they have the same out in the 1070 cards. A positive can be with the pre-OC they set in it, you will be getting a good GPU chip. It's also a small price premium to pay for watercooling a GPU rather than what one might sink into a custom loop on an unknown card. All to often people plan watercooling and lay out all the money before they even have all the hardware only to find they have a so-so CPU or GPU, and hundreds sunk into water cooling, ending up with a rig that gets outperformed by others with same CPU/GPU etc on air.
 

hardarse7

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Finally ordered a GTX 1080... found one actually LESS than full retail price, which was amazing. My plan is to SLI two of them but actually just need to replace an old, failing video card in my HTPC. So that will get the GTX 960 out of my (i7-920)desktop which will get the new GTX 1080, which it needs since I have a 50" samsung 4k TV as my monitor on that machine, and I want to play ROTTR (which came free with the 960) at full 4k glory. Eventually next year I will be upgrading the whole thing to a Kaby lake system, and adding the second GTX 1080. I think it is so stupid to get a TITAN-X for $1200 when you can get two 1080s for $1300 and get way better performance. I'll be locking it down to 60hz to match the TV (ju7100) so I don't need the fastest hotrod 1080 since I will have a pair of them. I got the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW DT GAMING. Seems like it's a reference card but with a second 8-pin power connector and 215watt TDP (up from 180) I assume to make it more overclockable. I may do that at first but once I get the second card I should be able to rock 60hz with any (SLI-capable) game. Ironically ROTTR wasn't scaling for SLI until recently, now with NINETY FIVE percent scaling! Again, why would anybody buy a TITANX when for similar-ish money you could have 195% better performance?
 

turkey3_scratch

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If their case is poorly ventilated how are they going to get properly ventilated air to the radiator?
 

Tradesman1

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+1 Unless of course you set it up to blow air from the outside in, which will increase the heat in the case ;)

On the other comment, the purpose of any cooling is to keep temps down....period...the lower the better, which can open the threshold for higher OCs and/or prolong the life of the component, so no, it's not pointless.
 

redgarl

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No need for any major cooling components, the card can't be pushed really higher than 1950 Mhz boost in-game.

Just put the Witcher 3 and any OC past 1950 MHz is unstable. Just get an EVGA AC3 or a MSI TF and skip the rest... it's a total waste of money.
 

thundervore

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Weil the point is to remove the hot air away from the GPU. the only way this can be done in a poorly ventilated case is setting the radiator as exhaust and making the case negative pressure. As long as all openings have dust filters the temperatures inside the case should be ok.

 


How can you argue that the blower design is an advantage, when

a) It runs hotter than a normally cooled AIB card ?
b) it can not come close to matching the performance of an AIB card ?

How can you claim this is a superior cooling solution when

a) it provides no advantage and
b) if installed as per Corsair's published recommendations ...radiator fans are installed as intakes which means you two arguments are opposing one another. Why is Corsair publishing installation instructions saying to install rad fans as intakes ?

I repeat it so often that I didn't bother this time .... but isn't it obvious ? 1) An AIB is cheaper than an FE so who would buy it and 2) it has never been advisable to buy a reference card. There is a reason why blower style cards never test well, main one being blower style coolers don't cool well. No one has ever explained why blowing air into the case is an issue other than "heat is bad". What component are we worried about here ? Why do non-blower cards always have lower temps and better performance ?

Do the math ... a properly designed case does a complete air turnover on the average of twice every second....what are we worried about here when all the heat is outside the case in half a second ? Do the math with blower style coolers and CLCs on CPU "exhausting air out" contrary to CLC manufacturer's recommendations. What results is more air blowing out than blowing in which means that GFX card blower exhaust as well as the hot PSU exhaust is being sucked right back in thru

the rear grille.



Better said, I think ....Unless, of course, you install exactly per Corsair's published installation instructions:

For the best cooling performance, we recommend mounting the fans as an air-intake to your PC case.
As for the purpose of cooling, I think clarification is needed ?

The purpose of cooling is not to keep components within accepted operating ranges not to reduce cooling just for the sake of cooling "Bragging rights". Same for CPUs.... was a day that you reached the temperature limit long before you reached the voltage limit. Now, I seem to hit the voltage limit more often then we hit the temperature limits. If I am seeing peaks of 1.5volts and 72C, I see no reason to try and improve cooling... I'm not going to raise that voltage so a better cooler isn't going to do anything for me.

When I say pointless, there is no point in going to every increasing expense to reduce temperatures if it does not provide a return on the investment. To take a specific GFX card which his max stable OC at 74C is not going to get any higher clock at 50C

Cost must always be part of the equation, otherwise there's no room to consider anything but the best

1. The 1080 will start to throttle after breaking 82C .... any decent AIB card will be in the low 70s when at it's max OC. So, no ... there is no potential for bigger OCs because no AIB card with a decent air cooler is getting anywhere near it's throttling point.

The days where liquid cooling brought anything to the table performance wise are gone, at least on the nVidia side. It's simply a matter of do I pay a small price premium for a decent air cooler or do I pay twice that premium or more for something that will provide zero return on that extra investment ?

2. There is no evidence that has **ever** shown GFX cards to be at any risk to useful life from running below their throttling point. If you want to kill a decent AIB GFX card, you need to overvolt and nVidia has made it virtually impossible.

On the 7xx series and even 9xx series, it was kind of silly as despite the 50C GPU temps, VRM temps were getting well into the high 80s and affecting stability. The 10xx series is free of this concern. However if we are going to argue that the GPU benefits in some way from the hydrid cooling then why has no one ever explained why the same liquid cooling logic doesn't extend to the VRM or memory ? VRM Failures are historically, the most common cause of GFX card failure.

We have a build here with two GTX 560 Tis in SLI ... the cards start throttling after 84C and they are just below that with a 28% OC. In a few months it will be 6 years old. In 23 years, we have never had a GFX card failure ... never heard of a failure related to an nVidia GFX card electromigration / heat degradation at any "safe OC" where throttling does not occur. Did read of AMD mining cards go down on occasion but those old cards are not under discussion here.

A hybrid is more at risk from galvanic corrosion than an air cooled 10xx AIB card is from thermal deterioration.
https://martinsliquidlab.wordpress.com/2012/01/24/corrosion-explored/

There certainly are reasons to water cool a GFX card ... aesthetics are better, SLI problems disappear, noise reduction is significant (at least on custom loops) but the simple fact is nVidia's cards have gotten so efficient, that water cooling brings nothing but "bragging rights" to the table.

My personal box has SLI'd 780s with Furmark temps of 39C if i don't limit fan speeds.... limiting max rpm to inaudible levels, results in 44C. The 5C sound gain, has a return on investment ... box is completely dead silent. The lower 5C, does not have one. On air, the card is just over 69C at same OC .. well below the 95C danger point and well below the temperature at which performance is in any way affected.



 

Tradesman1

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Sorry but this whole response is full of contradictions. You seem to be talking down water cooling, talking about cost being factored in, etc, etc and then end things talking about you Z87 Formula build, I know I always found that interesting as when you built it I was running 780s (stock cards) at a higher OC that your 780s, had my 4770K at a higher OC (on air), never any problems with SLI and never heard of water cooling improving SLI. Yet you poured how many hundreds of dollars into your CPU/GPU water cooling? and how long did you spend setting it all up and OCing it. Think you mentioned a couple weeks or more in an earlier thread. But you say the cards are perfectly fine on air temps wise? So never did understand the purpose.
 
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