Corsair CMU32GX4M2C3200C16B on Ryzen 1800x Issues

asdfasdf119

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Oct 27, 2008
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Hi everyone,

Bought a new PC a few months ago, didn't bother to mess with the ram since Ryzen was so new I knew there would be compatibility issues. Waited a few months now, and flashed the bios to the latest. Trying to get my ram to the rated speeds and can't get it to post at anything higher than 2133.

specs
Gigabyte Aorus x370 Gaming K5
Ryzen 1800x
Corsair CMU32GX4M2C3200C16B. Checked HWinfo and its a samsung chip.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
There are lots of Samsung chips. Which one might make a lot of difference. Ryzen really tends to like the Samsung B die ICs. The D and other Samsung dies are or can be, hit or miss. Compatibility has gotten a lot better though. That is Vengeance memory, and I've seen a lot of Ryzen systems that didn't like Vengeance modules. Those are the lower end enthusiast models from Corsair honestly. Ryzen tends to favor memory like G.Skill Trident Z or Flare-X modules, or Corsair Dominator. Even some of those have been found to be problematic though.

Certainly there are things you can do to work around this in most cases. A lot of times it's simply configuration problems because many, if not most, of these modules had profiles that were intended for use with Intel systems. That is slowly changing, but the fact remains.

You can try manually setting the primary timings and voltage using the Ryzen calculator.

https://www.techpowerup.com/246355/ryzen-dram-calculator-1-3-1-by-1usmus-released


And you may find that it's necessary to give the memory a slight bump in voltage, incrementally, in as small of increments as possible, in order to get them to run at a given timing or speed. Not sure on that motherboard, but generally these days when possible try .005v increments. A lot of Gigabyte boards won't allow changes to memory voltage in increments smaller than .020v, so try just using the + and - keys in the memory voltage fields when and if you make any changes.

If you want memory that works correctly out of the box, then I'd do some homework here:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/18051-memory/1627555-ryzen-memory-ic-collection-thread.html

Also, there is the fact that practically forever there has often been a need to apply AT LEAST a small overclock to the CPU in order to get memory to run at it's rated speed, if it's rated speed is significantly higher than the default JEDEC SPD value.

I think you will be lucky if you can get those modules to run at 2666mhz without having to overclock the CPU at least somewhat. You may not be able to get them to run past 3000mhz even with an overclock, but it is probably at least worth trying to do so as Ryzen really likes fast memory if you can get it to run and be stable. Be VERY sure to check stability using Memtest86 for at least two full passes followed by an 8 hour run of Prime95 version 26.6 (And ONLY version 26.6) after you do get them running in order to rule out any instability that might introduce micro-errors into your file system. This is VERY important.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
There are lots of Samsung chips. Which one might make a lot of difference. Ryzen really tends to like the Samsung B die ICs. The D and other Samsung dies are or can be, hit or miss. Compatibility has gotten a lot better though. That is Vengeance memory, and I've seen a lot of Ryzen systems that didn't like Vengeance modules. Those are the lower end enthusiast models from Corsair honestly. Ryzen tends to favor memory like G.Skill Trident Z or Flare-X modules, or Corsair Dominator. Even some of those have been found to be problematic though.

Certainly there are things you can do to work around this in most cases. A lot of times it's simply configuration problems because many, if not most, of these modules had profiles that were intended for use with Intel systems. That is slowly changing, but the fact remains.

You can try manually setting the primary timings and voltage using the Ryzen calculator.

https://www.techpowerup.com/246355/ryzen-dram-calculator-1-3-1-by-1usmus-released


And you may find that it's necessary to give the memory a slight bump in voltage, incrementally, in as small of increments as possible, in order to get them to run at a given timing or speed. Not sure on that motherboard, but generally these days when possible try .005v increments. A lot of Gigabyte boards won't allow changes to memory voltage in increments smaller than .020v, so try just using the + and - keys in the memory voltage fields when and if you make any changes.

If you want memory that works correctly out of the box, then I'd do some homework here:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/18051-memory/1627555-ryzen-memory-ic-collection-thread.html

Also, there is the fact that practically forever there has often been a need to apply AT LEAST a small overclock to the CPU in order to get memory to run at it's rated speed, if it's rated speed is significantly higher than the default JEDEC SPD value.

I think you will be lucky if you can get those modules to run at 2666mhz without having to overclock the CPU at least somewhat. You may not be able to get them to run past 3000mhz even with an overclock, but it is probably at least worth trying to do so as Ryzen really likes fast memory if you can get it to run and be stable. Be VERY sure to check stability using Memtest86 for at least two full passes followed by an 8 hour run of Prime95 version 26.6 (And ONLY version 26.6) after you do get them running in order to rule out any instability that might introduce micro-errors into your file system. This is VERY important.
 

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