Question Corsair CXM or RMX?

Aug 11, 2019
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Hey there. I need a PSU for my ≈410W PC. I'm on a tight budget, and hesitating over which of two products i should choose.

The Corsair CX450M is cheaper, and apparently still is pretty good. But while the RM550X is more expensive, i also expect it to be better built and be more durable. As you may have guessed, i can't really be 100% sure.

The question is, which one should i choose, and is the $40 gap worth it? Please consider that every dollar counts.
 

jankerson

Judicious
BANNED
Hey there. I need a PSU for my ≈410W PC. I'm on a tight budget, and hesitating over which of two products i should choose.

The Corsair CX450M is cheaper, and apparently still is pretty good. But while the RM550X is more expensive, i also expect it to be better built and be more durable. As you may have guessed, i can't really be 100% sure.

The question is, which one should i choose, and is the $40 gap worth it? Please consider that every dollar counts.

The RMX is worth it defiantly worth the investment.
 
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jonnyguru

Distinguished
Well, the CX has 1 bad model and 1 good model can you show me which one you are looking at?
No. The CX450M is a CX450M. Before that, it was called the CX430M.

Hey there. I need a PSU for my ≈410W PC. I'm on a tight budget, and hesitating over which of two products i should choose.

The Corsair CX450M is cheaper, and apparently still is pretty good. But while the RM550X is more expensive, i also expect it to be better built and be more durable. As you may have guessed, i can't really be 100% sure.

The question is, which one should i choose, and is the $40 gap worth it? Please consider that every dollar counts.
The RMx is a huge improvement over CX-M.

To give you an idea, the Corsair line up currently goes:

CX-M<CX<Vengeance<TX-M<RM<RMx.
 
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It's high enough, i don't need anymore than that, As i said, i'm trying to make as much savings as possible.
It isn’t high enough. It can deliver 450W of continuous power. Components can spike and performance degraded over time. The PSU will run hotter, further degrading performance on top of that. You’re better off spending a bit more for a better product that will last longer. I put a 650W unit in my PC and it’s out-lasted 2 systems. On my 3rd build using it now.
 
It's high enough, i don't need anymore than that, As i said, i'm trying to make as much savings as possible.
The point is, running PSUs at 90% of their rated capacity might be 'pushing it'...

I get PSUs like electrical engineers put in circuit breakers....twice the capacity of nominal load...

There are indeed still acceptable quality bronze/silver 600 watt PSUs for $60 or so...; no need to choose a 450 watt unit to save $5....

On a side note, my Corsair CX600 has been flawless since March of 2017, and cost $55 or so...(but with a GTX1060-6 GB and a 7700K, it is probably only under a 250 watt peak load anyway, and even then only when gaming... But it has sufficient overhead /power budget available for getting a better GPU in the future..)
 
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Aug 17, 2019
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It isn’t high enough. It can deliver 450W of continuous power. Components can spike and performance degraded over time. The PSU will run hotter, further degrading performance on top of that. You’re better off spending a bit more for a better product that will last longer. I put a 650W unit in my PC and it’s out-lasted 2 systems. On my 3rd build using it now.
Most psu are designed to handle those kind of transient spikes. there are certain exception cough cough focus cough cough
 
Aug 17, 2019
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Cheaper ones not as well though and there’s still degradation with running the PSU at over 80% load for load periods.
Source on the 80% figure ? And no , only cheaply made double forward units will experience out of ATX spec voltage when met with high transient spikes , like the CXM above... for example a CX would handle transient peak just fine...
 
Aug 17, 2019
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Heat degrades all electronics faster than base rate it’s how electronic components work. More load = more heat = faster degradation.
The manufacturer set it to output that much wattage continously.
Actually more , to provide leeway for protections (120%+ usually , some exceptions are the focus/focus+ and masterwatt).
Thus it probably lasts a veeeery long time , like outside of end user noticeabley long , otherwise the manufacturer wouldnt have rated it to output that much.
and ATX spec will likely change , before the psu fails anyway , given that the psu has full protectons..
 
I could see that true with older or cheap power supplies, but this doesnt apply to any modern made Corsair

Say you have a "450w PSU" like this but the specs are below.

+3.3V(orange)30A
+12V(Yellow)20A
-12V(Red)0.8A
+5V(Blue)32A
While it says it is 450W, if you draw 80% of 450W (or 360w) you would be massively overloading the psu as there are only 240w on the 12v rail where the majority of power is demanded. This will certainly degrade the PSU.
 
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The manufacturer set it to output that much wattage continously.
Actually more , to provide leeway for protections (120%+ usually , some exceptions are the focus/focus+ and masterwatt).
Thus it probably lasts a veeeery long time , like outside of end user noticeabley long , otherwise the manufacturer wouldnt have rated it to output that much.
and ATX spec will likely change , before the psu fails anyway , given that the psu has full protectons..
Actually they don’t that’s the maximum it’s rated to handle which is why the efficiency ratings aren’t measure at 100% load. you also have to look at what the components are rated at. Plus the fact that a PSU has multiple rails. The 450W isn’t all on the 12V.
 
Aug 17, 2019
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I could see that true with older or cheap power supplies.

Say you have a "450w PSU" like this but the specs are below.

+3.3V(orange)30A
+12V(Yellow)20A
-12V(Red)0.8A
+5V(Blue)32A
While it says it is 450W, if you draw 80% of 450W (or 360w) you would be massively overloading the psu as there are only 240w on the 12v rail where the majority of power is demanded. This will certainly degrade the PSU.
LOL
what kind of ancient psu has 32 FREAKING AMPS ON THE 5V RAIL???????????? and 30A on the 3.3v rail?????
I was talking about PSUs that arent complete trash , aka PSUs that are rated to output some wattage and are rated to output that entirely on the 12V rail...
(aka most psus nowadays , only exceptions are group reg trash)
 
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