[SOLVED] Corsair Hydro H60 cabling (Pump tach and Fan tach cables)

Apr 16, 2020
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Hi All
I just install a Corsair Hydro H60 and when cabling it as advised in the manual with the bellow the FAN only runs at full RPM and is crazy load.
Pump tach cable connect to CPU_FAN
Fan tach cable connect to 4Pin header on MB

If I just connect the Fan tach cable connect to the CPU_FAN then it runs almost silent. Anyone else had issues?

Thanks in advanced
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
The design concept for this AIO system is that the pump should run full speed all the time. Control of the CPU cooling is done automatically by connecting the FAN to the CPU_FAN header and letting it control that fan's speed according to the internal temperature sensor inside the CPU chip.

The IDEAL way to do this IF your mobo has BOTH a CPU_FAN header and a CPU_OPT header is to plug the PUMP into the CPU_FAN header, and the fan into the OPT header. In BIOS Setup configure both to use the new PWM Mode if possible. This is based on the way the mobo headers monitor their device's speed signals for FAILURE. The CPU_FAN header tends to be very careful about failures, and in an AIO system failure of the PUMP is the most critical. Both of the CPU_* headers use the CPU chip's internal temp sensor as their guide.

If you don't have those two headers, next best is when you have a CPU_FAN header AND a PUMP header. Then you plug the fan into the CPU_FAN header, and the pump into the PUMP header. A PUMP header will always supply the full 12 VDC the pump needs, and should monitor it carefully for failure.

If neither of those is possible and you have only a single CPU_FAN header plus some SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers, then here's how. Connect the rad FAN to the CPU_FAN header, and let it do its automatic control job. This is the one header that uses the temp sensor inside the CPU chip to guide its automatic fan speed control. Then plug the pump unit into one of the SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers. Configure this one to use the new PWM Mode if at all possible., even though its cable is a 3-pin system. This makes use of a quirk resulting from the design of the two fan types. When you plug a 3-pin fan (or pump) into a 4-pin header using PWM Mode, that fan (or pump) always receives the full 12 VDC power supply and always runs full speed - as a pump is supposed to do.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: GarrettL

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
The design concept for this AIO system is that the pump should run full speed all the time. Control of the CPU cooling is done automatically by connecting the FAN to the CPU_FAN header and letting it control that fan's speed according to the internal temperature sensor inside the CPU chip.

The IDEAL way to do this IF your mobo has BOTH a CPU_FAN header and a CPU_OPT header is to plug the PUMP into the CPU_FAN header, and the fan into the OPT header. In BIOS Setup configure both to use the new PWM Mode if possible. This is based on the way the mobo headers monitor their device's speed signals for FAILURE. The CPU_FAN header tends to be very careful about failures, and in an AIO system failure of the PUMP is the most critical. Both of the CPU_* headers use the CPU chip's internal temp sensor as their guide.

If you don't have those two headers, next best is when you have a CPU_FAN header AND a PUMP header. Then you plug the fan into the CPU_FAN header, and the pump into the PUMP header. A PUMP header will always supply the full 12 VDC the pump needs, and should monitor it carefully for failure.

If neither of those is possible and you have only a single CPU_FAN header plus some SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers, then here's how. Connect the rad FAN to the CPU_FAN header, and let it do its automatic control job. This is the one header that uses the temp sensor inside the CPU chip to guide its automatic fan speed control. Then plug the pump unit into one of the SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers. Configure this one to use the new PWM Mode if at all possible., even though its cable is a 3-pin system. This makes use of a quirk resulting from the design of the two fan types. When you plug a 3-pin fan (or pump) into a 4-pin header using PWM Mode, that fan (or pump) always receives the full 12 VDC power supply and always runs full speed - as a pump is supposed to do.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: GarrettL
Apr 16, 2020
2
0
10
0
The design concept for this AIO system is that the pump should run full speed all the time. Control of the CPU cooling is done automatically by connecting the FAN to the CPU_FAN header and letting it control that fan's speed according to the internal temperature sensor inside the CPU chip.

The IDEAL way to do this IF your mobo has BOTH a CPU_FAN header and a CPU_OPT header is to plug the PUMP into the CPU_FAN header, and the fan into the OPT header. In BIOS Setup configure both to use the new PWM Mode if possible. This is based on the way the mobo headers monitor their device's speed signals for FAILURE. The CPU_FAN header tends to be very careful about failures, and in an AIO system failure of the PUMP is the most critical. Both of the CPU_* headers use the CPU chip's internal temp sensor as their guide.

If you don't have those two headers, next best is when you have a CPU_FAN header AND a PUMP header. Then you plug the fan into the CPU_FAN header, and the pump into the PUMP header. A PUMP header will always supply the full 12 VDC the pump needs, and should monitor it carefully for failure.

If neither of those is possible and you have only a single CPU_FAN header plus some SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers, then here's how. Connect the rad FAN to the CPU_FAN header, and let it do its automatic control job. This is the one header that uses the temp sensor inside the CPU chip to guide its automatic fan speed control. Then plug the pump unit into one of the SYS_FAN or CHA_FAN headers. Configure this one to use the new PWM Mode if at all possible., even though its cable is a 3-pin system. This makes use of a quirk resulting from the design of the two fan types. When you plug a 3-pin fan (or pump) into a 4-pin header using PWM Mode, that fan (or pump) always receives the full 12 VDC power supply and always runs full speed - as a pump is supposed to do.
Thank you for the very detailed reply, this makes perfect sense now! Outstanding 🆒
 

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