[SOLVED] Corsair Liquid AIO

Jul 16, 2022
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So I'm thinking of getting a Corsair iCUE H100i Elite Capellix Liquid CPU Cooler and was wondering if anyone had experience with Corsair coolers. My fear is the common "does it leak" concern. Most people I've talked to said to get air coolers because they have less risk of ruining the computer if they fail. Not to mention cheaper too, but ive had bad experiences with fans rattling so I'm not certain about fan continuity. I'm also not to confident in the air displacement of air coolers in a Cougar Gemini case.
If anyone has recommendations for 240+ Corsair coolers, experience with them, or just wanna talk about the noise factor between Air vs AIO liquid kits then by all means please help educate/assure me. Thanks!
Its on an Intel i7-12700K.
 

Phaaze88

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My fear is the common "does it leak" concern.
No AIO/CLC is leak proof. They are leak resistant.
Whether they do or don't depends on how the user handles them. [I've read that the early gens were more prone to it. Now they're built like tanks.]


the noise factor between Air vs AIO liquid kits then by all means please help educate/assure me.
Most AIO/CLCs are potentially louder. Just look at the fan specs between them and air coolers. They typically come with stronger fans because of the impedance caused by the use of high FPI(Fins-Per-Inch) radiators, like 20FPI or so.
There are models that use lower FPI rads, but I don't know why they aren't more common; the coolers with higher FPI rads see optimal performance around higher fan curves, whereas lower FPI is designed around lower curves and higher rpm doesn't improve performance much on them, but it doesn't matter when some users don't really want to hear their fans.
Yes, I know about manually setting fan curves, but it doesn't change the fact that AIO/CLCs are potentially louder - the fans aren't the only factor involved. There's the location of the air pockets.

AIO(All-In-One) and CLC(Closed-Loop-Cooler), the latter gets generalized to an AIO, when it actually isn't. To set them apart:
AIO: It's a prefilled custom loop, but can be refilled and upgraded by the end user. Uses custom loop parts, allowing for some part replacement, or even expansion.
CLC: It's a pre-filled loop that cannot be opened up or filled by the user without them breaking it in some manner. Plug-n-play, then toss the unit(keep the working fans) when it doesn't work anymore.
There aren't as many actual AIOs in the market as before. Not necessarily(?) a bad thing [since most people want things to just work and get rid of them when they don't], but if one is an environmentalist, CLCs are the most wasteful of the 3. An AIO at least has the option of salvaging.

Both AIO/CLC lose fluid to evaporation(permeation through the tubing) over time. What this means is that subsequent Years will never beat Year 1's performance, but at least AIOs are refillable.
There are 3 inevitable causes of pump failures:
Mechanical: The pump will fail, it's just a matter of when.
Biological: Organic material in the loop restricting or blocking flow? That's this one. The prefilled coolant has biocides mixed in to prevent this, but they have an expiration date.
Chemical: Kinda goes in hand with biological, but the factor this time is galvanic corrosion(look it up) as a result of the majority of AIO/CLCs being mixed metal(aluminum radiator, copper cold plate). The prefilled coolant has inhibitors mixed in, but they too expire. This one is easily avoided if the manufacturers went all copper(expensive) or all aluminum(DON'T use liquid metal).
 
Reactions: Crosslhs82x2
I have had the 150 (360mm) version of the same model as yours for about a year with no problems. My previous Corsair AIO was about 2-3 years old and again I had no problem. I only upgraded because I got an excellent deal and wanted the RGB, I also had a plan to do a second build using several spare parts but haven’t got around to it yet.

I would also expect with Corsair for them to stand behind their warranty but I have never needed to use it.
 
Hi
I have used only Corsair Aio's so I can only comment on them.
I have used them on the Amd Fx and carried them over to 3 different Ryzen system .
The Aio's range from H80i, H100iv2, 2x H110i, and the H150i Elite Capellix.
None of them Ever Leaked.

The H100iv2 was the only 1 that had to be Rma'd I think due to permeation after about 4 yrs of the 5yr warranty.
It took approximately 13 days from time of dropping it off at the Ups store to recieving the replacement.

That Rma period will be down time for Your System if you are not prepared for such things happing when you have Aios.
Except for the higher end Ryzen's all have the stock coolers, which in a emergency can be put on and cpu's ran at stock settings in a pinch.

So food for thought with most Intels No Cooler!!!!!!

When I Rma'd that cooler I was prepared for my h110i to go before my wife's h100iv2 so I purchased a Arctic Esports 34 Duo for my 3600x Oc'd( at the time ) and put that on her's and she likes it more because of how quite it is compared the the h100iv2, so the Rma'd unit is still in it's box.

If You will list your system specs including your case and if you intend on Overclocking, the Others can give you better recommendations as to what Aio or Air cooler that will be a good fit for your needs.

Have A Great Weekend!!!!!!
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
My fear is the common "does it leak" concern.
No AIO/CLC is leak proof. They are leak resistant.
Whether they do or don't depends on how the user handles them. [I've read that the early gens were more prone to it. Now they're built like tanks.]


the noise factor between Air vs AIO liquid kits then by all means please help educate/assure me.
Most AIO/CLCs are potentially louder. Just look at the fan specs between them and air coolers. They typically come with stronger fans because of the impedance caused by the use of high FPI(Fins-Per-Inch) radiators, like 20FPI or so.
There are models that use lower FPI rads, but I don't know why they aren't more common; the coolers with higher FPI rads see optimal performance around higher fan curves, whereas lower FPI is designed around lower curves and higher rpm doesn't improve performance much on them, but it doesn't matter when some users don't really want to hear their fans.
Yes, I know about manually setting fan curves, but it doesn't change the fact that AIO/CLCs are potentially louder - the fans aren't the only factor involved. There's the location of the air pockets.

AIO(All-In-One) and CLC(Closed-Loop-Cooler), the latter gets generalized to an AIO, when it actually isn't. To set them apart:
AIO: It's a prefilled custom loop, but can be refilled and upgraded by the end user. Uses custom loop parts, allowing for some part replacement, or even expansion.
CLC: It's a pre-filled loop that cannot be opened up or filled by the user without them breaking it in some manner. Plug-n-play, then toss the unit(keep the working fans) when it doesn't work anymore.
There aren't as many actual AIOs in the market as before. Not necessarily(?) a bad thing [since most people want things to just work and get rid of them when they don't], but if one is an environmentalist, CLCs are the most wasteful of the 3. An AIO at least has the option of salvaging.

Both AIO/CLC lose fluid to evaporation(permeation through the tubing) over time. What this means is that subsequent Years will never beat Year 1's performance, but at least AIOs are refillable.
There are 3 inevitable causes of pump failures:
Mechanical: The pump will fail, it's just a matter of when.
Biological: Organic material in the loop restricting or blocking flow? That's this one. The prefilled coolant has biocides mixed in to prevent this, but they have an expiration date.
Chemical: Kinda goes in hand with biological, but the factor this time is galvanic corrosion(look it up) as a result of the majority of AIO/CLCs being mixed metal(aluminum radiator, copper cold plate). The prefilled coolant has inhibitors mixed in, but they too expire. This one is easily avoided if the manufacturers went all copper(expensive) or all aluminum(DON'T use liquid metal).
 
Reactions: Crosslhs82x2

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