[SOLVED] Corsair RM1000x power cable is bigger than socket ?

Sep 20, 2021
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Hello, I purchased a Corsair RM1000x PSU for my 3080 Ti/Ryzen 5600X system and discovered that my psu power cord is rated at 16A 250V and won’t go into my 5A socket. Is an adapter safe to use? Wiring isn’t an option since ups in my country comes with the smaller socket. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
 

Eximo

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Generally power supplies are rated from 100-250 volts. This covers North America (115(though also 230)), Japan (100, at least partially, north south thing as I recall), Europe (220-250), and Mainland Asia(240).

As the voltage increases, the current goes down.

10A at 230V is 2300W, that is way more than a RM1000x should pull. But those could be short bursts, which wouldn't result in much heating in the wires. And that is all the safety is about, the heat load on the wires. Your circuit breakers are designed to protect your wiring, not your stuff. It is up to the devices to protect themselves, and your PSU will have Over Current, Over Voltage, etc protections to protect itself and your components.

PSUs are rated in efficiency, so 90% being a reasonable average for the PSUs you are looking at (80+ is 80%, Bronze is 85%, and so on) Actually more efficient at the higher voltages.

So they will pull that extra 10% over their deliverable power. You should expect an 1100W draw from a 1000W PSU running full capacity, which by the by, you won't be running anyway. So the power draw will be even less. On average you are probably looking at 500W under a full load, so 550W or so from the wall.

There are certainly higher capacity circuits and wiring standards for larger appliances, but your 1000W PSU doesn't meet those limits. In the US some of the 1500/1600W PSUs require a 20A circuit instead of the normal 15A, and that means a different outlet, larger wire gauge, and a bigger circuit breaker at the panel. Pretty rare to need such a PSU unless doing hardcover overclocking or mining.

A good adapter should be fine, but it is better to just buy a cable and avoid the extra connection. Doesn't have to be today, you can always order a decent cable shipped to you.
 
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Juular

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Use a different cable proper for the type of outlet you have in your country. Not the cheap kind you can tie bows with, but thick ones like for the laser printer.
 

Eximo

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Yep, you just need a new cord. 5A at 250V is 1250W, plenty to run a 1000W unit at 90% efficiency. (Not going to be much left over for other things though, so no heavy appliances on the same circuit)
 
Sep 20, 2021
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What 5 amp socket? Wall socket? PSU socket?
Is this the power cord that came with the PSU?
If so....it won't fit into the wall socket?
Hello there, yes. My wall socket is rated at 5 amp 230 v. And the 16 amp 250 v is the power cord that came with the psu.
 
Sep 20, 2021
4
0
10
0
Use a different cable proper for the type of outlet you have in your country. Not the cheap kind you can tie bows with, but thick ones like for the laser printer.
Yep, you just need a new cord. 5A at 250V is 1250W, plenty to run a 1000W unit at 90% efficiency. (Not going to be much left over for other things though, so no heavy appliances on the same circuit)
Hello. Ah I see. Would an adapter socket(5Ato 15A) be a safer option as I don’t have quality psu cords in my country. My only concern is, I heard that 15A/16A wall sockets have thicker wiring to support the heavy supply. So would I not be harming the circuitry/pc in some way when the pc tries to suck in more than capable from the socket? I saw that the rm1000x pulls from 6.5-10A. And my socket only has a max of 5A. Apologies but I’m a complete newb at circuitry.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Generally power supplies are rated from 100-250 volts. This covers North America (115(though also 230)), Japan (100, at least partially, north south thing as I recall), Europe (220-250), and Mainland Asia(240).

As the voltage increases, the current goes down.

10A at 230V is 2300W, that is way more than a RM1000x should pull. But those could be short bursts, which wouldn't result in much heating in the wires. And that is all the safety is about, the heat load on the wires. Your circuit breakers are designed to protect your wiring, not your stuff. It is up to the devices to protect themselves, and your PSU will have Over Current, Over Voltage, etc protections to protect itself and your components.

PSUs are rated in efficiency, so 90% being a reasonable average for the PSUs you are looking at (80+ is 80%, Bronze is 85%, and so on) Actually more efficient at the higher voltages.

So they will pull that extra 10% over their deliverable power. You should expect an 1100W draw from a 1000W PSU running full capacity, which by the by, you won't be running anyway. So the power draw will be even less. On average you are probably looking at 500W under a full load, so 550W or so from the wall.

There are certainly higher capacity circuits and wiring standards for larger appliances, but your 1000W PSU doesn't meet those limits. In the US some of the 1500/1600W PSUs require a 20A circuit instead of the normal 15A, and that means a different outlet, larger wire gauge, and a bigger circuit breaker at the panel. Pretty rare to need such a PSU unless doing hardcover overclocking or mining.

A good adapter should be fine, but it is better to just buy a cable and avoid the extra connection. Doesn't have to be today, you can always order a decent cable shipped to you.
 
Reactions: ikinson
Sep 20, 2021
4
0
10
0
Generally power supplies are rated from 100-250 volts. This covers North America (115(though also 230)), Japan (100, at least partially, north south thing as I recall), Europe (220-250), and Mainland Asia(240).

As the voltage increases, the current goes down.

10A at 230V is 2300W, that is way more than a RM1000x should pull. But those could be short bursts, which wouldn't result in much heating in the wires. And that is all the safety is about, the heat load on the wires. Your circuit breakers are designed to protect your wiring, not your stuff. It is up to the devices to protect themselves, and your PSU will have Over Current, Over Voltage, etc protections to protect itself and your components.

PSUs are rated in efficiency, so 90% being a reasonable average for the PSUs you are looking at (80+ is 80%, Bronze is 85%, and so on) Actually more efficient at the higher voltages.

So they will pull that extra 10% over their deliverable power. You should expect an 1100W draw from a 1000W PSU running full capacity, which by the by, you won't be running anyway. So the power draw will be even less. On average you are probably looking at 500W under a full load, so 550W or so from the wall.

There are certainly higher capacity circuits and wiring standards for larger appliances, but your 1000W PSU doesn't meet those limits. In the US some of the 1500/1600W PSUs require a 20A circuit instead of the normal 15A, and that means a different outlet, larger wire gauge, and a bigger circuit breaker at the panel. Pretty rare to need such a PSU unless doing hardcover overclocking or mining.

A good adapter should be fine, but it is better to just buy a cable and avoid the extra connection. Doesn't have to be today, you can always order a decent cable shipped to you.
That’s awesome. Thank you for the detailed explanation! I’ll just contact Corsair for an rm850x plug cable which comes with a smaller plug.
 

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