Question Corsair x series water cooling

EndEffeKt_24

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I have a corsair 465x case
Asrock b450m steel legend
Amd ryzen 5 2600x
Rx570 4gb
So all straight fittings of the above will be fine for my build
You do realize that the watercooling system will cost more than your actual components? I love watercooled rigs, but I honestly dont see why you would not rather upgrade your gpu for example. For the price of your cpu-loop you could buy a 2060 super.
 
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Omar nagdee

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You do realize that the watercooling system will cost more than your actual components? I love watercooled rigs, but I honestly dont see why you would not rather upgrade your gpu for example. For the price of your cpu-loop you could buy a 2060 super.
Ok but wouldnt it be unstable. Sorry for terminology. First ever build so still fairly new to pc's in general
 

EndEffeKt_24

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Contrary to what the internet, and youtube especially, show us, watercooling is not a necessity. Yes, your components might run a couple of degrees cooler and you can do a lot of cool stuff with it, but the gain in performance is pretty insignificant. On top of that it adds a whole new level of complexity to your system.
Example at hand:
I build my first watercooled rig with 2x240 rads in a sff case in octobre and it worked right off the bat. Only problem was that Asus for some reason installs tempsensor headers on its B450-i Strix, but doesnt let you use them properly in Bios. So my fans were still running based on cpu temp and with Ryzen that leads to the whole system constantly revving up and down.
To rackle that I installed a 3th party monitoring software that overwrote my fan profiles and finally let me use water temp for fan control.
Until the next problem raised its head and some of my games like Dayz and Rainbow Six lead to the service freezing my water temp readings so the software reported 29c while my system was slow-cooking itself. Watertemp 50c, gpu and cpu 85c and the chassis was burning hot to the touch. Lucky enough I realized it and tracked down the issue before it leaked on me.
In the end many modern games terminate asus mobo service processes that are responsible to report sensor readings to software applications like the one I was using. I did then find a little bit of space left in my system to install an Aquaaero 4 to run my watercooling stuff.

Thats just my 2 cents on increased system stability under water. Honestly stick with air on your first rig. Especially if you could use the money on hardware upgrades instead.
Cheers
 
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rubix_1011

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I've watercooled for 18 years and have had 1 leak over that time, which was my own fault due to incorrectly tightened compression fitting.

For a first time builder, my recommendation would be air cooling until you have a firm grasp on how airflow and cooling works. Having a great cooler but poor airflow renders the great cooling obsolete....cooling of any sort requires good airflow to be successful.

Poor airflow in a PC is the same as a convection oven: a heat source which just blows the same hot air around inside. Thus, it gets hotter and hotter.
 
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Omar nagdee

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I've watercooled for 18 years and have had 1 leak over that time, which was my own fault due to incorrectly tightened compression fitting.

For a first time builder, my recommendation would be air cooling until you have a firm grasp on how airflow and cooling works. Having a great cooler but poor airflow renders the great cooling obsolete....cooling of any sort requires good airflow to be successful.

Poor airflow in a PC is the same as a convection oven: a heat source which just blows the same hot air around inside. Thus, it gets hotter and hotter.
I have the arctic sports duo 34.
I have also been told by a friend to get 1070/1080 so which would be better or should i get the 2060 super mentioned above
 

ttower2020

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A custom water cooling loop is a very big custom component. You should stick with a normal air or AIO watercooler. Especially for a Ryzen 5, a custom loop is way overkill, and just provides much more complexity to the system. I personally got a Be Quiet Dark Rock Pro 4, and even that is overkill for a Ryzen 5, I just wanted it to stay quiet. You can get a smaller air cooler that will still keep it very cool. If you still want water cooling, a 240mm AIO is plenty.
 

Karadjgne

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Air cooling is the simplest, most cost effective cooling. Cpus/gpus come with coolers, the bigger cpus require coolers, both of which are relatively cheap and comparatively easy to install, maintain and understand.

The next step is AIO's/Hybrid gpus which start liquid cooling. They do the same job basically, but do it differently to air. There are bonuses and drawbacks to either cooling solution. Like you don't need to spend $150 on ARGB fans when a $150 AIO comes with 3 of them. Cases usually only having @ 2 fans to start with. So prices can balance out overall depending on what you are looking for.

Full custom loops are a whole different ballgame. Not only must you have a clue as to what to expect, but must also have a wallet that expects it. $8 per fitting on average, 2 fittings per component (not including $16 disconnects, valves or extensions) decision on hard or soft tube changes fittings and sizes of tubing, bends, maintenance, coolant type, $100 for 1 cpu block, $150 for gpu block, $100 for pump and reservoir, $60 per radiator... Expect to add @ $700 easily, just for cooling.

That's more expensive than a RTX 2080 Super.

You don't learn to drive in a Ferrari. You learn in a beat up old Honda, work your way upto a Mercedes, and maybe one day spend the rest of your life babying a Ferrari on the weekends.
 
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EndEffeKt_24

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I have the arctic sports duo 34.
I have also been told by a friend to get 1070/1080 so which would be better or should i get the 2060 super mentioned above
Nothing wrong with your existing cooler I'd say. For a gpu everything starting from 200 $ is a good upgrade to your trusty rx570.
I would look at used gtx 1070 for 200 $, used 1080ti 300-360 $. New hardware would be maybe 5600xt or 1660 super in the 250-300$ range.
In my opinion those would be upgrades that do not completely break the bank.
 
Nothing wrong with your existing cooler I'd say. For a gpu everything starting from 200 $ is a good upgrade to your trusty rx570.
I would look at used gtx 1070 for 200 $, used 1080ti 300-360 $. New hardware would be maybe 5600xt or 1660 super in the 250-300$ range.
In my opinion those would be upgrades that do not completely break the bank.
And if water cooling is still on your mind, make sure to buy a card that has a block available. That way if you do decide to step into watercooling you'll know it's available for your selected parts.
 
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rubix_1011

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Cards like EVGA are normally 'reference' PCB (but check anyway).

I will give myself a budget when I am in the market for a GPU with the idea that my actual cost is (GPU+GPU block) as a total price because I always watercool my builds. I then find blocks from manufacturers that I like and then ensure the SKU/part number is a card within my budget I want to buy.

Early adoption cards can be a bit tricky, like when I got my EVGA RTX 2080, the EK Velocity block I got for it was for a 2080, but there wasn't 'official' fitment validation at the time by EKWB. However, I did some checking and verified it had been validated by other people...and it does fit perfectly. In fact, the reason ended up getting a 2080 over a 2070 was because there were not any 2070 blocks available at the time.
 

Omar nagdee

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Cards like EVGA are normally 'reference' PCB (but check anyway).

I will give myself a budget when I am in the market for a GPU with the idea that my actual cost is (GPU+GPU block) as a total price because I always watercool my builds. I then find blocks from manufacturers that I like and then ensure the SKU/part number is a card within my budget I want to buy.

Early adoption cards can be a bit tricky, like when I got my EVGA RTX 2080, the EK Velocity block I got for it was for a 2080, but there wasn't 'official' fitment validation at the time by EKWB. However, I did some checking and verified it had been validated by other people...and it does fit perfectly. In fact, the reason ended up getting a 2080 over a 2070 was because there were not any 2070 blocks available at the time.
Oh OK i don't understand all that yet but will go for 1070/1080 anyway. I just look for the cheaper option and as long as it works i should be fine.
 
Oh OK i don't understand all that yet but will go for 1070/1080 anyway. I just look for the cheaper option and as long as it works i should be fine.
Works fine as an air cooled card is different than has a block available. Just remember that part. A used 1070/1080 is a solid deal if you get a good price on it. But if again you choose to watercool it down the road, you may have an issue getting a block for it.

Some manufacturers use custom pcbs. Basically take what nvidia made and make improvements, thus changing the design.
Reference boards use what nvidia designed and put a different cooler on it. This matters little to actual performance UNLESS you try to watercool. As most block makers design there blocks on reference design boards and rarely make blocks for the custom cards.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Yes, Gmoney06ss is correct and the definition provided is better than I was able to do. :)

Reference PCB: Layout is exactly what Nvidia or AMD provides for card partners to use to use when they build a card - essentially OEM spec

Custom PCB: Layout can differ from what Nvidia or AMD provides...more MOSFETS or VRMs (or their layout) for power handling, additional memory modules (ex: card with more onboard RAM) or even smaller cards for HTPC or low-profile options.
 

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