Question Could hooking up a liquid cooler to case fan plug, with a case fan in the cpufan port cause a cpu or board issue?

Dakoda4

Distinguished
Jul 11, 2012
8
0
18,510
0
I am diagnosing a computer for a friend, and they put in a liquid cpu cooler about 1 month ago. and it starting occasionally not turning on, so they replaced the power supply. I have tested the new power supply, and the case cables for the switch, both are good. Yet still no boot. However I noticed that a case fan was plugged into the cpu fan and the liquid cpu cooler was plugged into a case fan port, with the coolers fan plugged into yet another case fan port instead of the cooler. Specs: MSI ZH77A-G43 MB, EVGA 850 BQ PS, 2 seagate 1tb hdd, 1 SP SSD not sure what size. 8Gx2 Gskill DDR3-1866 & 4Gx2 Gskill DDR3-1600 for RAM. Don't want to take off the cooler to see what processor it has.
 
I am diagnosing a computer for a friend, and they put in a liquid cpu cooler about 1 month ago. and it starting occasionally not turning on, so they replaced the power supply. I have tested the new power supply, and the case cables for the switch, both are good. Yet still no boot. However I noticed that a case fan was plugged into the cpu fan and the liquid cpu cooler was plugged into a case fan port, with the coolers fan plugged into yet another case fan port instead of the cooler. Specs: MSI ZH77A-G43 MB, EVGA 850 BQ PS, 2 seagate 1tb hdd, 1 SP SSD not sure what size. 8Gx2 Gskill DDR3-1866 & 4Gx2 Gskill DDR3-1600 for RAM. Don't want to take off the cooler to see what processor it has.
Why is it connected wrongly ? That should be addressed first.
In any case, if there a fan is not connected or does not get detected properly in CPU_FAN header, most modern MBs will not allow the BOOT to protect CPU.
 
Oct 8, 2020
29
1
35
0
I have my friends using liquid cooler for months now. And they never complained anything about the issue you are thinking may happen in the future. But can't guarantee as I haven't yet used it
 

Mr.Spock

Commendable
Dec 8, 2019
1,000
108
1,690
96
the pump being plugged into a case fan header is not a problem. the cooler (radiator) fan should be plugged into the CPU fan in that case though so it responds to CPU temp.
otherwise the cooler fan is cooling in response to system/ambient temps.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
304
75
10,890
6
The CPU header is by default monitored for rpm in the bios. When a liquid cooler is used there is usually a secondary pump header and potentially a secondary cooler fan header. If the CPU header does not detect rpm it will not post unless the bios is set to ignore the signal. The fact that the case fan was plugged into the header would have allowed the system to post. The danger here though is that the cooler pump was plugged into a case fan header. In any AIO setup the pump should run at near full rpm all of the time, with the radiator fans allowed to throttle to cpu temp. Having it plugged into a chassis header could make the AIO pump potential run at a far lower RPM than it should. Depending on workload this could potentially allow the CPU to overheat. To a certain degree the system will throttle it self. At a certain point the bios will shut down the system to protect itself. Get things plugged into the right spots and I have a feeling that at least some of the issue will be taken care of. The fans on the radiator should be plugged into the CPU fan header if there is no secondary dedicated header. If using a secondary header make sure to set the bios to ignore the cpu fan speed or you will get a post error.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS