could someone older than 90 years old live without any aging / chronic disease?

brannsiu

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Apr 20, 2013
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Could someone older than 90 years old live without any aging or chronic, major disease?

For example, common aging diseases like cancer,
heart attack, stroke, diabetes... high blood pressure... etc?

Is it possible? If it's possible, is it largely due to genetics or lifestyle changes?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Very unlikely. By that age, something will be wrong somewhere. Just because something is wrong doesn't necessarily mean that death is imminent though, at least not for a while. Nobody EVER lives without any aging though. We are all aging, all the time, until we die.

Not too sure what this question has to do with anything on a tech forum however. Still, anybody of that age will have some form of medical problem that requires at least monitoring if not medication and ongoing treatment.
 

Math Geek

Glorious
Herald
george burns popped into my head first. smoked his big ol stogies until the end and was pretty healthy for most of it.

plenty of other examples but none were perfectly healthy at that age. our bodies are not really meant to last as long as we are now. we're able to push it longer and longer but not without issues popping up.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator


In the worldwide population, there are some, certainly.

Any specific individual? No.

And we do not know nearly enough to say "Do A, B, and C, and you will live to Age X"
 

brannsiu

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Apr 20, 2013
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Does mother side or father side play a more important role in gene?
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Neither, genetics is a result of probability and chromosome crossovers, its entirely random how much genetic information you inherit from one parent or the other.

Just a quick side note here, is there a reason you are asking these questions? Are you just curious or is it an assignment kind of deal.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator


I assure you that George Burns and anybody else over 90 certainly had SOME KIND of health issue or ailment. In point of fact, he fell and hit his head two years prior to his death and while there is no specific reason listed for the fall you could probably assume that there may have been some kind of underlying health issue to blame for the balance or impairment that caused him to fall. I've known a lot of people over 90 through the years. Not one of them didn't have something that required some kind of monitoring or medical treatment by that age.
 

BFG-9000

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It depends on how you define "someone." Some jellyfish and sea urchins are, so far as we know, essentially immortal. Quahog have been known to live 500 years, and sharks, whales and koi fish have been known to live over 200. For non-animals, colonies of fungi and aspen tree clones also live forever but obviously replace their parts.

Similarly, the cells in your body are continuously being replaced. Theseus's paradox raises the question of whether an object that has had all of its components replaced remains fundamentally the same object. The conventional example is if the present-day owner of George Washington’s axe "which has three times had its handle replaced and twice had its head replaced" should be proud of it.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Plenty of people who live completely drug and alcohol free lives, see their doctors regularly, eat well and don't smoke, plus get plenty of sleep, that still mostly all have some kind of major medical issue after age 90. Again, it's practically impossible to live that long and not have some kind of serious medical issue. It might not be something that is immediately putting your life at imminent risk of dying tomorrow, but there will be something by that age.

Our bodies just were not naturally designed to live that long and we haven't evolved to the point where that age is easily attainable yet. The vast majority of people are long dead before they ever see 85 years old. I don't think drinking is even necessarily a primary factor so long as you're not overdoing it. Most of the people that I know of who've lived past 100 have all said they drank alcohol regularly, but moderately. So it's primarily likely a genetic case by case factor.

Mostly, DNA simply cannot continue without detrimental deterioration by the time it's that old, in humans at least.
 
Oct 22, 2018
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It was impossible if you were talking about 40 years back. These days its possible but very difficult. If a person has a good lifestyle or good genes they might be living a healthy life even in their 90s.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The question wasn't whether somebody that old could be healthy, as I said before. It was "Could someone older than 90 years old live without any aging or chronic, major disease".

Nobody EVER could live without aging. That simply is impossible, and at that age SOMETHING will be wrong or some chronic condition will be present. Even if they are in the best of health otherwise.
 

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