[SOLVED] CPU and GPU! I need help choosing!

Dec 5, 2017
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0
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PC:
Motherboard: Asus M32C4-k (FCLGA 1151 socket)
Ram: 2x8 DDR4 2400mhz
PSU: EVGA 500w (or possibly higher, I don't remember)
HDD: 1 TB (is always at C:100% , don't know why) *Yes, I've tried to fix
SSD: Samsung 860 EVO (500 GB)
Cpu Cooler: Stock Intel cooler
Monitor: Sceptre 24' 144hz

*Parts that I'm looking to upgrade
CPU: i5-7400 3.00 GHz
GPU: EVGA GTX 1050ti SSC

Games I play:
-Counter-Strike: Global Offensive
-Modern Warfare (2019)
-Apex Legends
-Rainbow Six Siege
-Battlefield 1 (Soon V)

*I am not a wealthy person by any strike of imagination, I am trying to keep the price between (CPU: 100-below 300ish) and (GPU: 100-below 300ish)
Black Friday and Cyber Monday Sales are encouraged :)
*Thank you for any help :)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Using a B360 isn't an option unless you have an 8th gen CPU to update the BIOS with so that that board will support a 9th gen CPU. Deal breaker.

B365 can work, but I removed that from the previous build because it defeats the option for you to be able to add faster RAM later if you want, OR to be able to overclock that CPU. If you have ZERO interest in replacing your memory with a faster kit at some point and will never entertain the possibility of overclocking your CPU, then the B365 is fine, as is a lighter CPU.


PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.88 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $533.83
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-10 22:49 EST-0500




No, you don't. Not if they are attached to a Microsoft account registered in your name and attached to an email account you have access to.

How to associate your windows 10 license with a Microsoft account

Reactivating Windows 10 after a hardware change

Windows build 1607 (Or newer) and activation after a hardware change


 
Dec 5, 2017
39
0
530
0

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So, they can be hard to find information on if they are an OEM prebuilt type system. Board makers don't usually offer product pages for those type boards like they do for their aftermarket models. It's also hard to say exactly what will work in one of them because they often have very limited BIOS because they are usually fairly low end and not intended to be used with anything other than what came in them plus one or two other options so they can use the same board for several different prebuilt models.

If you are looking to only upgrade the CPU then I'd probably say it's not worth it unless you are willing to roll the dice on a used one. A new i7 for that generation, like an i7-7700 or 7700k, costs over 300 dollars while you could get a six core 8th or 9th gen Intel CPU AND motherboard for less or about that price. There are AMD offerings where you could likely get a board and CPU that are significantly better than anything you could upgrade to on that platform as well for about the same or less.

Also, your 500w EVGA power supply pretty much has to be a low quality unit because EVGA hasn't sold anything in a 500w capacity that would be considered "good" in a very long time. Too long to even consider continuing to use it IF it was one of the halfway decent 500w models they used to sell. Most likely it is a 500w B, N1 or W1 unit, none of which are good enough to consider using with any upgraded graphics card than what you have now. Both because of capacity considerations and, more importantly, because of the internal build quality of those units. They just will not hold up for very long at all and are an unnecessary risk.

I'd probably recommend doing something like this. This would give you a very significant jump from where you are now. This is, of course, assuming you have a case that supports an ATX motherboard. If you do not and must use a Small form factor, microATX or other, possibly proprietary form factor board, then a different board would need to be selected OR it might not be possible at ALL to do anything without a different case. IDK for sure, because that motherboard has no legitimate model that I can find any information on. The model you've listed is for the whole system and these OEM type systems often don't have separate board information available at all.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.00 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Best Buy)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $558.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 13:56 EST-0500




Or something like this, but again, you will want to try and verify for certain what sizes/form factor of motherboard that your case supports. Posting a picture of your current motherboard IN your case, might be helpful in trying to determine that.


PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($93.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $488.95
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 14:07 EST-0500
 
Dec 5, 2017
39
0
530
0
So, they can be hard to find information on if they are an OEM prebuilt type system. Board makers don't usually offer product pages for those type boards like they do for their aftermarket models. It's also hard to say exactly what will work in one of them because they often have very limited BIOS because they are usually fairly low end and not intended to be used with anything other than what came in them plus one or two other options so they can use the same board for several different prebuilt models.

If you are looking to only upgrade the CPU then I'd probably say it's not worth it unless you are willing to roll the dice on a used one. A new i7 for that generation, like an i7-7700 or 7700k, costs over 300 dollars while you could get a six core 8th or 9th gen Intel CPU AND motherboard for less or about that price. There are AMD offerings where you could likely get a board and CPU that are significantly better than anything you could upgrade to on that platform as well for about the same or less.

Also, your 500w EVGA power supply pretty much has to be a low quality unit because EVGA hasn't sold anything in a 500w capacity that would be considered "good" in a very long time. Too long to even consider continuing to use it IF it was one of the halfway decent 500w models they used to sell. Most likely it is a 500w B, N1 or W1 unit, none of which are good enough to consider using with any upgraded graphics card than what you have now. Both because of capacity considerations and, more importantly, because of the internal build quality of those units. They just will not hold up for very long at all and are an unnecessary risk.

I'd probably recommend doing something like this. This would give you a very significant jump from where you are now. This is, of course, assuming you have a case that supports an ATX motherboard. If you do not and must use a Small form factor, microATX or other, possibly proprietary form factor board, then a different board would need to be selected OR it might not be possible at ALL to do anything without a different case. IDK for sure, because that motherboard has no legitimate model that I can find any information on. The model you've listed is for the whole system and these OEM type systems often don't have separate board information available at all.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.00 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Best Buy)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $558.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 13:56 EST-0500




Or something like this, but again, you will want to try and verify for certain what sizes/form factor of motherboard that your case supports. Posting a picture of your current motherboard IN your case, might be helpful in trying to determine that.


PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($93.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $488.95
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 14:07 EST-0500
Thank You for informing me. I knew it was a weird board, but I wasn’t aware of the bios not supporting certain CPU’s. I do in fact have a smaller pc, so I most likely will take up your idea and get a newer case, mobo and gpu. However, I checked and I have a EVGA 600w Black power supply, so I’ll hold off on that. Hopefully this can happen with all the deals coming in late November!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is a 100-W1-0600-K1 which as I said earlier, is a W1 model, and is poor quality. Actually, they are VERY poor quality, although not to the level of being "dumpster fire" quality. They are fine for office or internet browser type machines, but they are not suitable for gaming or other high demand type systems. You WILL have problems if you use that with something that actually NEEDS a 500w or higher capacity. Anything beyond what you currently have, and honestly, I wouldn't have ever recommended it for use with that either because long term it's just not suitable, is not wise or recommended.

Please read this:

 
Dec 5, 2017
39
0
530
0
That is a 100-W1-0600-K1 which as I said earlier, is a W1 model, and is poor quality. Actually, they are VERY poor quality, although not to the level of being "dumpster fire" quality. They are fine for office or internet browser type machines, but they are not suitable for gaming or other high demand type systems. You WILL have problems if you use that with something that actually NEEDS a 500w or higher capacity. Anything beyond what you currently have, and honestly, I wouldn't have ever recommended it for use with that either because long term it's just not suitable, is not wise or recommended.

Please read this:

So where do you suppose I go from here? I have a secondary power supply that is the same wattage that is gold 80+.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I suggest you read the link I posted, because if you had you'd already know that whether a unit is Bronze, or Gold, or has no 80plus certification at all, has no primary relevance as to whether the unit is any good or not other than the fact that these days there are really not any "good" units that are not at least Bronze or Gold certified BUT there are PLENTY of units that DO have those certifications that are not worth squat.

The MODEL, is the only thing, EVER, that can determine whether the unit is any good or not AND even if a unit IS good, if it is older than the warranty it originally had, it is probably a very bad idea to even consider using that unit. Internally, capacitors age and degrade, electromigration and whiskering are factors over time, and there are other age related considerations as well. Just isn't worth it when you look at the cost of a new unit compared to the potential cost of the damage it can cause if it fails.

So, in light of all that, and what has been discussed already, what is the most you think you could realistically afford to put towards an upgrade that consists of a new CPU, motherboard, power supply, graphics card and case? Your memory, drives and other components can likely all be reused. You might also need to add a fan or two depending on what case you go with and whether or not there are any usable fans from your current build, which is doubtful
 
Dec 5, 2017
39
0
530
0
I suggest you read the link I posted, because if you had you'd already know that whether a unit is Bronze, or Gold, or has no 80plus certification at all, has no primary relevance as to whether the unit is any good or not other than the fact that these days there are really not any "good" units that are not at least Bronze or Gold certified BUT there are PLENTY of units that DO have those certifications that are not worth squat.

The MODEL, is the only thing, EVER, that can determine whether the unit is any good or not AND even if a unit IS good, if it is older than the warranty it originally had, it is probably a very bad idea to even consider using that unit. Internally, capacitors age and degrade, electromigration and whiskering are factors over time, and there are other age related considerations as well. Just isn't worth it when you look at the cost of a new unit compared to the potential cost of the damage it can cause if it fails.

So, in light of all that, and what has been discussed already, what is the most you think you could realistically afford to put towards an upgrade that consists of a new CPU, motherboard, power supply, graphics card and case? Your memory, drives and other components can likely all be reused. You might also need to add a fan or two depending on what case you go with and whether or not there are any usable fans from your current build, which is doubtful
I’d estimate around 5-600
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.88 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $608.83
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 22:57 EST-0500
 
Reactions: urbina.christian123
Dec 5, 2017
39
0
530
0
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.88 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $608.83
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-09 22:57 EST-0500
What if i replaced the Z390 with a B-360M-A and kept my case? What would I be losing by this replacement? Also don't I have to re-buy Windows 10 and all of my Microsoft subscriptions?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Using a B360 isn't an option unless you have an 8th gen CPU to update the BIOS with so that that board will support a 9th gen CPU. Deal breaker.

B365 can work, but I removed that from the previous build because it defeats the option for you to be able to add faster RAM later if you want, OR to be able to overclock that CPU. If you have ZERO interest in replacing your memory with a faster kit at some point and will never entertain the possibility of overclocking your CPU, then the B365 is fine, as is a lighter CPU.


PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.88 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $533.83
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-10 22:49 EST-0500




No, you don't. Not if they are attached to a Microsoft account registered in your name and attached to an email account you have access to.

How to associate your windows 10 license with a Microsoft account

Reactivating Windows 10 after a hardware change

Windows build 1607 (Or newer) and activation after a hardware change


 

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