Question cpu being maxed out

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
So i have an i5 6600k and a rtx 2070. i havent upgraded my cpu just yet but in the new cod mw game, my cpu is being maxed out even when i turn all the settings to the lowest they can go. performance is great but my cpu maxing out makes it so my discord doesn't work. my mic wont pick up my voice and im not able to hear anyone in the discord. when i alt tab, i can hear my friends and they can hear me and my cpu goes back to around 50% usage but as soon as i tab back in, my cpu goes back to being maxed. i don't see why this would be a bottlenecking issue. the recommended specs is a i7 4770k and my cpu performs just about the same. would anyone know the issue behind this?
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
Lack of extra threads, which the 4770k has, but the 6600k doesn't. You just said so yourself with this:
"...my cpu is being maxed out even when i turn all the settings to the lowest they can go." That's the indication of a cpu limitation; when you lower the graphics and fps does not improve.

Also, having just 1 stick of ram instead of 2 does this as well. The cpu and memory work as a pair, after all.
 
a 6600K being at/near 100% will be quite common in today's games; paired with an excellent GPU such as an RTX2070 or above, it will be an absolute fact of life. (You can try capping frames at only 60 fps to partially free up some CPU resources..)
 

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
Lack of extra threads, which the 4770k has, but the 6600k doesn't. You just said so yourself with this:
"...my cpu is being maxed out even when i turn all the settings to the lowest they can go." That's the indication of a cpu limitation; when you lower the graphics and fps does not improve.

Also, having just 1 stick of ram instead of 2 does this as well. The cpu and memory work as a pair, after all.
sounds about right. ill upgrade my cpu sooner than later i guess. about time for an upgrade. Any opinions on what i should get?
 

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
a 6600K being at/near 100% will be quite common in today's games; paired with an excellent GPU such as an RTX2070 or above, it will be an absolute fact of life. (You can try capping frames at only 60 fps to partially free up some CPU resources..)
ill give that a shot. i didn't even think to cap my fps
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
You would need to give us a budget. While it would be simple to just recommend a used 7700k, those things can still go for top dollar even in the 2nd hand market.
It may be more worthwhile to just get a new combo - cpu/motherboard/ram.

What memory are you currently using, DDR4 or DDR3L? If it's the former, it would actually be cheaper for you to do an Intel combo over an AMD Ryzen one -
you wouldn't be able to get away with using slower DDR4 on a Ryzen build due to them having some of their performance gated behind memory speed.
 

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
You would need to give us a budget. While it would be simple to just recommend a used 7700k, those things can still go for top dollar even in the 2nd hand market.
It may be more worthwhile to just get a new combo - cpu/motherboard/ram.

What memory are you currently using, DDR4 or DDR3L? If it's the former, it would actually be cheaper for you to do an Intel combo over an AMD Ryzen one -
you wouldn't be able to get away with using slower DDR4 on a Ryzen build due to them having some of their performance gated behind memory speed.
here is my pc: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/MyNameWasRobbed/saved/#view=dZgx6h
i would like to be able to rely on my next cpu for a while. i was thinking about getting the i5 9600k but im not all too sure. should i just wait until i have enough to buy the next upgrade up to the 9700k? or would amd be better?
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
here is my pc: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/MyNameWasRobbed/saved/#view=dZgx6h
i would like to be able to rely on my next cpu for a while. i was thinking about getting the i5 9600k but im not all too sure. should i just wait until i have enough to buy the next upgrade up to the 9700k? or would amd be better?
AMD would be better.
I take back what I said, since your current memory kit is already great - carry that over and just get a new cpu and mobo:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME X570-P ATX AM4 Motherboard ($166.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $361.78
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:39 EDT-0400

Too much?
Maybe this one?
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($148.90 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $243.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:40 EDT-0400


With a 9600K instead:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($214.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 GAMING X ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($137.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $351.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:43 EDT-0400



View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ke3OnFlOUnI&t
 

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
When cpu is maxed out, you have to increase graphical quality settings (not lower them). This increases gpu load, less frames can be drawn and that decreases cpu load.
Or you can set fps cap or set vsync to adaptive.
this works. capping my fps to like 60 seems to do the trick. loading screens still max out my cpu bc loading screens hit like 500 fps but other than that it runs fine. i appreciate all the help i recieved
 

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
AMD would be better.
I take back what I said, since your current memory kit is already great - carry that over and just get a new cpu and mobo:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME X570-P ATX AM4 Motherboard ($166.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $361.78
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:39 EDT-0400

Too much?
Maybe this one?
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($148.90 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $243.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:40 EDT-0400


With a 9600K instead:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($214.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 GAMING X ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($137.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $351.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-20 04:43 EDT-0400



View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ke3OnFlOUnI&t
are you recommending that i upgrade both my cpu and motherboard? would changing my motherboard help performance in any way or what. im not too familiar with what all motherboards have to offer other than compatibility and ram speed. is it necessary to upgrade my motherboard?
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
Well, you know Ryzen is a completely different platform, so you can't avoid changing the motherboard there.

Sadly, Intel are greedy pricks and deliberately force it's customers to change mobos every other generation.
Even though your 6600k, a 7700k, 8700k, and 9600k all fit Socket LGA 1151, the pricks at Intel separated them on the bios level - no way around it:
6600k - compatible with 100 and 200 series Intel mobos
7700k - 100 series(requires bios update) and 200 series
8700k - compatible with 300 series Intel boards only
9600k - requires bios update on all 300 series, except B365 and Z390

Besides compatibility, the other thing to consider about a motherboard is features.
[This is just a generalization, there are exceptions.]
1)M-ITX: the small form factor, the barebones option, the cheapest(usually), limited variety, fits pretty much all cases
-You just want to slap in a cpu, a couple sticks of ram, 1 - 4 storage drives, a gpu, and be on your way.

2)ATX: the standard, a few extra features(bluetooth, wi-fi, more PCIE slots, etc), the middle of the road, when the small form factor offers too little, the most variety, fits most cases
-You need a little more than just the barebones. Perhaps you want to add a sound card? A wi-fi, or network adapter? A fan hub(add in card)?
Up to 6 or 8 storage drives? M.2? Multi-gpu - SLI/XF?

3)E-ATX: the Big Daddy, loaded with features, the Bank Slammer, when you want it ALL, limited variety(it already has everything!), limited case compatibility(usually restricted to the largest cases).
-You want ALL of the features, have 10+ storage drives, and throw value out the window to get it.

It's ultimately up to you to choose to upgrade the motherboard. If not, the 7700k is as far as you can go, and as I said before, those things are still not cheap, even in the 2nd hand market.
 
Reactions: brokeBuilder2019

CrosshairPvP

Reputable
Nov 22, 2015
15
0
4,510
0
Well, you know Ryzen is a completely different platform, so you can't avoid changing the motherboard there.

Sadly, Intel are greedy pricks and deliberately force it's customers to change mobos every other generation.
Even though your 6600k, a 7700k, 8700k, and 9600k all fit Socket LGA 1151, the pricks at Intel separated them on the bios level - no way around it:
6600k - compatible with 100 and 200 series Intel mobos
7700k - 100 series(requires bios update) and 200 series
8700k - compatible with 300 series Intel boards only
9600k - requires bios update on all 300 series, except B365 and Z390

Besides compatibility, the other thing to consider about a motherboard is features.
[This is just a generalization, there are exceptions.]
1)M-ITX: the small form factor, the barebones option, the cheapest(usually), limited variety, fits pretty much all cases
-You just want to slap in a cpu, a couple sticks of ram, 1 - 4 storage drives, a gpu, and be on your way.

2)ATX: the standard, a few extra features(bluetooth, wi-fi, more PCIE slots, etc), the middle of the road, when the small form factor offers too little, the most variety, fits most cases
-You need a little more than just the barebones. Perhaps you want to add a sound card? A wi-fi, or network adapter? A fan hub(add in card)?
Up to 6 or 8 storage drives? M.2? Multi-gpu - SLI/XF?

3)E-ATX: the Big Daddy, loaded with features, the Bank Slammer, when you want it ALL, limited variety(it already has everything!), limited case compatibility(usually restricted to the largest cases).
-You want ALL of the features, have 10+ storage drives, and throw value out the window to get it.

It's ultimately up to you to choose to upgrade the motherboard. If not, the 7700k is as far as you can go, and as I said before, those things are still not cheap, even in the 2nd hand market.
ive been reading around and im seeing that amd seems to get better fps per dollar. also seeing that amd has better upgradability. So if im wanting to be able to not have to upgrade for a while and get great performance on games and have a reliable set up for making music, what would you suggest? ryzen 5 3600 with a better mobo?
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
ive been reading around and im seeing that amd seems to get better fps per dollar. also seeing that amd has better upgradability. So if im wanting to be able to not have to upgrade for a while and get great performance on games and have a reliable set up for making music, what would you suggest? ryzen 5 3600 with a better mobo?
That has been the general recommendation, yes.
 
Sep 14, 2019
58
11
45
2
9600k - requires bios update on all 300 series, except B365 and Z390
Hi, I'm curious where this kind of information is available (i.e. whether or not a given CPU requires a bios update for a certain chipset like Z390). I have been looking for this kind of info for my planned build.

More specifically, I'm interested in whether or not an i9-9900k would require a bios update of an ASUS z390-based board. I've heard of many issues with my particular ASUS board, but suspect that all that is required is a bios update. But I've not been able to get any concrete data on this matter. Even the mobo manual is very barebones and doesn't mention this.

If this is off-topic on this thread, pls let me know and I'll post a separate thread.

Thanks !
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
Hi, I'm curious where this kind of information is available (i.e. whether or not a given CPU requires a bios update for a certain chipset like Z390). I have been looking for this kind of info for my planned build.

More specifically, I'm interested in whether or not an i9-9900k would require a bios update of an ASUS z390-based board. I've heard of many issues with my particular ASUS board, but suspect that all that is required is a bios update. But I've not been able to get any concrete data on this matter. Even the mobo manual is very barebones and doesn't mention this.

If this is off-topic on this thread, pls let me know and I'll post a separate thread.

Thanks !
On this site, when you try to pair a 9th gen Intel with other boards besides B365 and Z390, you will get a compatibility warning in a big red bar across the top of the page.

A 9900k would require a bios update on Z370 - but that's a terrible pairing for that cpu anyways, as none of the Z370 boards, and even some of the Z390s have the beefy VRMs required to handle this monster's power draw.
 
Sep 14, 2019
58
11
45
2
On this site, when you try to pair a 9th gen Intel with other boards besides B365 and Z390, you will get a compatibility warning in a big red bar across the top of the page.

A 9900k would require a bios update on Z370 - but that's a terrible pairing for that cpu anyways, as none of the Z370 boards, and even some of the Z390s have the beefy VRMs required to handle this monster's power draw.
Ok. I did create a parts list on that site and did not find any compatibility issues between my mobo (z390-e) and the i9-9900k, but despite that, I have read reviews that mentioned needing to do a bios update. I'm just trying to determine whether or not, out of the box, this board will play nicely with the i9-9900k or if a bios update will be required (and this may or may not be related to the poor reviews this board has received on newegg.com - https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813119151)

However, ASUS has not mentioned this anywhere (whether or not a BIOS update will be required for the i9-9900k). It's not in the mobo manual and doesn't seem to be on their site.

I'm just curious what the source of your info was, referring to the line I quoted from you. Was it the parts picker site ?

9600k - requires bios update on all 300 series, except B365 and Z390
EDIT - Never mind, I figured it out. The ASUS website does mention the info I need: https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-Z390-E-GAMING/HelpDesk_CPU/
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
There are no compatibility issues with 9th gen on B365 on Z390... but with that particular motherboard, going by the 1 and 2 star reviews on newegg, there appear to have been bios stability issues...

OR it had something to do with this:
I do remember them getting some flak for stealthily trying to sneak in a bunch of bloatware. They did it with a few of their motherboards, and a number of user's systems didn't take to it too well, I assume. Probably best to avoid that particular model.

The source of my info was from the partpicker site, and general knowledge.
When the 8th gen launched, the following chipsets were prepared for them:
Q370
B360
H310
H370
Z370

Then Ryzen 2000 happened(if I recall correctly?), Intel panicked yet again, and then rushed out 9th gen. Of course, this meant none of the previous boards listed contained the necessary microcode to ID these new chips, so the bios would need to be updated for them to do so.
At the same time, Intel - or perhaps the board manufacturers(?), launched B365 and Z390 bios compatible with 9th gen out of the box.

It's the same deal with your current 6600k and the 7000 series cpus. A 7700k can work with 100-series Intel motherboards, but requires a bios update.
200-series work with 7000 out of the box and are also backwards compatible with 6000 series.
 
Reactions: brokeBuilder2019
Sep 14, 2019
58
11
45
2
There are no compatibility issues with 9th gen on B365 on Z390... but with that particular motherboard, going by the 1 and 2 star reviews on newegg, there appear to have been bios stability issues
...
Probably best to avoid that particular model.
Yeah, thanks for the info. I had my mind set on that board, but am looking to steer clear of it now.

Sorry, OP, for hijacking your thread ! :)
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS