[SOLVED] CPU connector caught fire URGENT HELP

BroBroBro

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Jul 15, 2017
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I just bought this motherboard off of someone. Long story short I plugged everything into the motherboard and as I turned it on with a screwdriver by connecting the power sw pins (I have done this hundreds of times so knew what I was doing) the CPU Power Connecter made a noise and started smoking and I knew the motherboard was a gone.

However, all the parts were tested on two systems before and they all worked perfectly.

First question, was it the motherboard that caused this and should I contact the seller?

Second question, the PSU is a 700w and has two 4 pin CPU connecters. I presume the first one is stuffed but I used the second one on a spare motherboard and the PSU still works perfectly.

Here is a image of the connectors - https://ibb.co/b69TGxr

My question is, can I get a 4 pin CPU connector to 2 x 4 pin CPU connector and still use it or will it be to much power going through one CPU pin connector? If I can't use do that could I just get a molex to 4 pin CPU connector?

Thanks for the help, I've already lost a decent amount of money because of this so don't want to mess this up.

Note: tested all the parts on my other computer including PSU and it all still works
 
Last edited:

BroBroBro

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Jul 15, 2017
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stick with 1 thread
I just bought this motherboard off of someone. Long story short I plugged everything into the motherboard and as I turned it on with a screwdriver by connecting the power sw pins (I have done this hundreds of times so knew what I was doing) the CPU Power Connecter made a noise and started smoking and I knew the motherboard was a goner.

I originally thought it could of been because I had two screw standoffs missing which were normally near the bottom of the motherboard which could have caused a short but that can not be the case as I have tested 3 - 4 computers whilst the motherboard was lying directly on the case metal (when the case was lying flat I had the mobo's resting on the corner).

I had a screw wedged in between the motherboard and the case and stupid me thought the part that was wedged (it was a thumb screw for a case, the top part specificly) thought that it was rubber. Would that of been the cause of the smoke and burn damage?

Just need to know as I am real nervous about building another computer because I really can not afford that happening again.
 
Seems like you caused a bad short between MB and case, that usually ends in a disaster. There is some insulation on the MB but is thin and may not cover all solder points.
To avoid mistakes like that, just be careful, read manual(s) and check everything several times. All posts on backing plate should be under holes in the MB,
 

BroBroBro

Commendable
Jul 15, 2017
15
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1,510
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Seems like you caused a bad short between MB and case, that usually ends in a disaster. There is some insulation on the MB but is thin and may not cover all solder points.
To avoid mistakes like that, just be careful, read manual(s) and check everything several times. All posts on backing plate should be under holes in the MB,
Confirms what I was thinking, thank you for that. Do you know how it would of been caused. I assume through the metal screw that was stuck between the motherboard and case but I also did not have the standoffs near the bottom of the motherboard. Circled bits are the only standoffs I had left: https://ibb.co/yY5cK2W

If those standoffs are 100 percent required to not cause a short should I just throw the case out/order standoffs because I am ordering more parts?

Feel dam stupid for not knowing about this after building more then 5 computers, thank lord it happened on a cheaper board though.
 

drivinfast247

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May 29, 2018
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Thank you for your help! I assume majority of cases share the same type of standoff?
The standoff location is determined by the motherboard. Cases are sold with the standoffs in a parts bag. Most cases are marked for different motherboard sizes ie: ATX, m-ATX, m-ITX...... It's always good practice to physically check post locations against the motherboard before installation, though.
 

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