Question CPU (i9-10900k) with water cooling goes to high temperatures and low frequency first few minutes after the PC has been started, then it works normal

Apr 1, 2022
4
0
10
0
As in the title...
The problem keeps happening even after changing windows power options, bios settings and even some of the cooling settings. I'm not a pro at these stuff so I might have missed something.
Anyways, this is what happens after I turn ON the PC.
For first couple of minutes, everything works fine. Then, suddenly, I hear my fans going loud and crazy (usually when watching youtube or even not doing anything at all). Then, when I for ex. turn on the google chrome, it takes forever. I open the task manager and what do I see? My CPU frequency is low, sometimes even 0.2 GHz. The temperature of the CPU during this time jumps to 97 - 100 °C (this is max allowed). It stays in this state for up to 10 minutes.

But then, surprisingly, the fans quite down, the CPU temperature and power consumption drops, CPU frequency goes up (up to 4.9GHz) and everything starts working like a crazy UFO faster than the speed of light. Damn I like my PC, but these few minutes of it's periods of uncertainty and self-doubt can sometimes be frustrating...
Anyone knows what could be the problem? Is it becoming sentient with feelings and stuff so it just over-stresses itself, or may it be something that is actually technical and possible to fix?

Edit: I tried a lot of things from this thread and I think I found the fix (I'll need to see for some time if the solution persists, I'll get later here with additional feedback). I installed the softwares that ~cw told me to install. There I noticed a weird thing. The upper fan that let's the heat out was using CPU temperature as an input for it's RPM, but the water cooling was using something else (is this even possible or am I going crazy?). Using the Smart Fan 5 graphs and temperature readings when this occured (again, after I turned on the PC) I noticed that, while the CPU Fan is on 100% (the noise of the fan was enough), all other FANs were set to 20% - 30% as their temperature input was around 30°C. When I changed the last one (100% on 34°C), the noise stopped and the PC got to the normal working again... I'll get back later after I restart the PC several times more... But, if this is correct, the input temperature for the water cooling isn't set as the CPU temp... What it is, who knows...
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Full specs including motherboard model, CPU cooler model, case, case fan configuration and orientation, power supply, graphics card and what the average ambient temperature is in the room where this system resides?
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Yeah, I would take a close look at any AIO software. Sounds like the CPU is throttling hard, and then suddenly gets cooling. That or your pump is having issues getting started.

If you don't have an AIO, can't think of anything off the top of my head that would cause the CPU to overheat and throttle only early on. Even a heatsink with non-working fan could probably do better than 200Mhz.
 
Apr 1, 2022
4
0
10
0
Full specs including motherboard model, CPU cooler model, case, case fan configuration and orientation, power supply, graphics card and what the average ambient temperature is in the room where this system resides?
Intel Core i9 10900K up to 5.3GHz, water cooling with 2 big fans (forgot what mark exactly), 32GB DDR4, 1TB NVMe SSD, NVIDIA GeForce RTX3090 24GB, no ODD, Z490 gaming motherboard, Thermaltake Toughpower 1050W powers the machine... There is also one additional big fan to throw away the heat from the housing. Usual room temperature is between 20°C and 27°C on hot summer days.

I'm sorry guys, but I don't know what AIO software is. You think I need to install one or to check if I already have one installed? I mean, a quick google search will tell me something I guess....
 
Apr 1, 2022
4
0
10
0
Here is the picture imgur.com/a/DrhPFln

Top left is the big fan to let out the heat.
On the right side are the fans and the cooler of the water cooling that cools the cpu in the upper middle (LED squared thing on the picture)... You can see two hoses in there.

Edit: my guess is that the pump has a slow start (thanks for this hint, didn't cross my mind), I don't know what else could be. When I play some hardcore games during hot summer days, everything is fine. The heating always works, it's just those few minutes after the PC boots. Maybe I need to give it a few nice calming words and just wait it out? ...
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
The way you have it installed should be fine, the pump is not at the highest point.

Air bubbles are still a possibility. You might just need to loosen the cooling system and give it shake and some rotations.

Also could be a sign of early pump failure.

AIO software is likely what you have controlling the RGB on the cooler, this would also be a software way to control pump speed, unless you are using the motherboard's RGB software.

If at boot the software is not loaded, the CPU overheats, dragging out the initial boot process, then when the software finally loads and starts the pump spinning it cools down. Something to look into.
 

~cw

Mar 31, 2022
39
3
45
1
Here is the picture imgur.com/a/DrhPFln

Top left is the big fan to let out the heat.
On the right side are the fans and the cooler of the water cooling that cools the cpu in the upper middle (LED squared thing on the picture)... You can see two hoses in there.

Edit: my guess is that the pump has a slow start (thanks for this hint, didn't cross my mind), I don't know what else could be. When I play some hardcore games during hot summer days, everything is fine. The heating always works, it's just those few minutes after the PC boots. Maybe I need to give it a few nice calming words and just wait it out? ...
That looks like a SilverStone PF240 (https://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=866&area=en) - compatible with various motherboards inbuilt fan / AIO and RGB management, so I would go into your BIOS and check what the fan curves are. I think your board is a Gigabyte Gaming X?

Make sure the relevant cables from the SilverStone AIO are all connected to the headers on the motherboard -- I don't think the Gigabyte Z490 has a dedicated W_PUMP header, so I'd make sure it's plugged sensibly. I can't see the motherboard through the glass panel to check.

If I were installing, I would probably do as others have recommended on Reddit for the Z390 as the 490 seems similar in this regard:
  • Connect the pump 3-pin cable to the CPU_FAN header in Auto or Voltage mode and the 4-pin fan cable to SYS_FAN1 in Auto or PWM mode.
  • In the BIOS I would CPU_FAN to 100% and for SYS_FAN1 set its temperature source to be the CPU temperature sensor.
  • Make sure that CPU FAN Stop is disabled.
However if your AIO is currently plugged up differently, don't just blindly unplug it and reconnect like above, at least not without taking photos and making notes of how it was connected before so you can revert. ;)

Check your BIOS fan curves in Smart Fan 5, you may also have an ineffective, aggressive curve which may be stopping the pump at boot, until the monitored temperature source reaches a threshold, at which point it starts up and you're OK afterwards. Seems like the CPU is crazy thermal throttling to begin with though. Happy the pump block is mounted sweetly on the CPU IHS? (did you DIY or buy prebuilt?)

The pump in operation should be gently audible if you put your head near the case, but it shouldn't be making any ugly screeching/grinding/popping/buzzing noises.

Do you use the external ARGB control box to set the lighting, connected to a SATA power cable, or is it connected directly to the motherboard on a D_LED1 header?

You can also install the Gigabyte Aorus System Information Viewer which people call "SIV" - that will let you access Smart Fan 5 from inside Windows instead of having to reboot into the BIOS. You need to install "APP Center" before you install SIV. Both are available from the Gigabyte site:
This guy did a video on installing SIV:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKVwPrAlo98
and did a previous video about using SF5 in the BIOS:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSYJ-b6UF1w
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Seems sensible. I'm not too sure that a fan setting, or even a pump setting, is the problem though since it works fine at first, then doesn't, then does for the remainder of time (I assume) that the system runs for.

I'd almost be tempted to say, stop shutting it down and just put it to sleep when you're done with it. Unless it's doing the same thing after resuming from sleep as well, which we don't really know since that wasn't made completely clear but I guess we can assume it's a definite maybe.

At least until the problem is found.
 
Apr 1, 2022
4
0
10
0
Guys|girls|apaches, your help is hugely appreciated. I will try these things now.
Thank you, really. I didn't expect this many people just coming here to helping me. Thank you!

I bought the PC built like this from a good store with lots of experience. I did mess with the curves once almost a year ago, that could be the cause... It was summer, I wanted to get a bit more out of it, but I lack the knowledge so this is what I get.
Anyways, thank you. I will try both looking and listening to the pump to see what happens when I turn on the PC. I'll look for bubbles too, and check the curves. After checking that and the wiring, I'll give you feedback.
Thank you! <3
 

uWebb429

Respectable
May 22, 2020
522
152
2,440
98
@CluelessNerdless
Try running a consistent full load test like Cinebench R20 or R23.
Run HWiNFO.

The 10850K and 10900K are like twins. At the same 4900 MHz, my 10850K can run Cinebench stable at 1.19V. Some Gigabyte Z490 motherboards at default settings are setting the CPU voltage at this speed to 1.30V to 1.35V or beyond. This is totally unnecessary and only creates a lot of unnecessary heat. Setting a -75 mV negative offset voltage in the bios can help reduce excess voltage.



I am using a Corsair H115i AIO liquid cooler.
https://www.corsair.com/ca/en/Categories/Products/Liquid-Cooling/iCUE-RGB-PRO-XT-Coolers/p/CW-9060044-WW

It is a little bigger than the Silverstone cooler (280mm vs 240mm) that you are using. The H115i is easily able to cool 180W during the above Cinebench test without breaking a sweat. The temps are fantastic.

Watch power consumption and VCore voltage while Cinebench is running. Also watch to see what sort of temperatures your CPU is reaching during this test. How many watts can your cooler manage without resulting in overheating?

Your cooler might not have been installed correctly. It might not be snug to the CPU. Perhaps the software used to control it is not setup or working correctly. My motherboard handles fan speeds automatically without needing any additional control software. It is dead silent at light load and the fans increase in speed only when needed.

You will like your computer a whole lot more once you get these cooling issues sorted out.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Your assumptions are not applicable to the general population, or any particular situation. What works for YOU is simply a sample of one. Every piece of silicon is unique and will have totally different thermal and electrical tolerances and properties compared to any other piece of silicon, even with the same model. So it is NEVER good advice to tell anybody use "this" voltage, or this clock frequency, for anything. Ever. Ever ever ever ever ever.

Everything needs to be individually tweaked, if tweaking is desired. In this case, it is seemingly not even a case of that, because at stock settings the Intel specified (And by default, applied) settings should be perfectly fine so long as the minimal required cooling that is capable of handling the required TDP is in use, without having to do anything more than make sure the cooling is properly installed. It's a high TDP CPU to be sure, and unless this is a case of a bad mount, then it's likely either a misconfiguration or the AIO is simply not capable enough for the configuration. You should not, ever, need to undervolt when you have adequate cooling unless there is a problem with a less than suitable board or a lack of airflow. Or perhaps even a bad piece of silicon.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS