Question CPU idle way to high

Kryptix06

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Aug 17, 2019
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Hi, I just built my pc and I have a Ryzen 3700x and it says that it idles around 52 but it was making 15c degree jumps up which I have a hard time believing is possible, is this a mistake?
 
15C jumps aren't out of the ordinary if something is using the CPU....even briefly.

Although 52C seems on the high side.

I'd run with the case open and see if it drops significantly and if it does I would add case cooling.
I would also check that the cooler is snug and the fan seems to be functioning.
If all this seems good...you may be able to adjust the fan curve to lower the idle temp.
 
Hi, I just built my pc and I have a Ryzen 3700x and it says that it idles around 52 but it was making 15c degree jumps up which I have a hard time believing is possible, is this a mistake?
Could you post you system components?
Which app are you using to check temps?
Make sure you have downloaded the AMD drivers for your motherboard chipset.
 
Jan 9, 2020
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Very common with Ryzen CPU's. You most likely have Precision Boost Overdrive enabled, which contributes heavily to this, but it also comes down to how the chip operates normally. When something happens, at least one core will activate from being dormant, and this causes the spike. It's not necessarily the temperature of the entire CPU, just the one core. There's tons of threads out there that explain this much better than I can though.

PBO might also be why you have such high temps. When I installed my R7 2700X, PBO was enabled, and it was pushing a voltage average of 1.45, which is pretty high, and contributed to very high temps. If this is a feature you intend to use, double check your cooling, ie proper thermal paste coverage, tight enough heatsink contact, proper airflow etc.
 
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Kryptix06

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Aug 17, 2019
269
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Very common with Ryzen CPU's. You most likely have Precision Boost Overdrive enabled, which contributes heavily to this, but it also comes down to how the chip operates normally. When something happens, at least one core will activate from being dormant, and this causes the spike. It's not necessarily the temperature of the entire CPU, just the one core. There's tons of threads out there that explain this much better than I can though.

PBO might also be why you have such high temps. When I installed my R7 2700X, PBO was enabled, and it was pushing a voltage average of 1.45, which is pretty high, and contributed to very high temps. If this is a feature you intend to use, double check your cooling, ie proper thermal paste coverage, tight enough heatsink contact, proper airflow etc.
I am sure that the cooler is doing its job but the problem is that ts running at 4.2 ghz how do I turn it down to 3.6 or something
 
Jan 9, 2020
226
48
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I am sure that the cooler is doing its job but the problem is that ts running at 4.2 ghz how do I turn it down to 3.6 or something
This is done in the BIOS. You'd need to disable Precision Boost Overdrive and any other Game Boost overclock setting. Set your CPU frequency to 3600MHz / 3.6 GHz and your voltage to 1.35 (that's just a starting point, it can most likely go lower and temps will follow). Most everything else can stay on Auto mode, if you're more of an overclocking beginner.

If your motherboard driver program has any custom performance profiles set, I'd recommend disabling them, as they may override any BIOS changes. (not sure if ASUS has an equivalent to MSI's DragonCenter)

In order to test how low you can safely set your voltage, I'd recommend installing Ryzen Master. There, you can test all different combinations of settings. They don't permanently apply to the system though, so when you reboot your pc it will be back to however you set the BIOS.

In Ryzen Master, run a stress test with the default settings (this should be exactly as you set it in BIOS). You can set how long the test is in the program settings, and enable a temperature graph to monitor temps over time.

After the test, lower your voltage by one step (click the down arrow next to it, the next step down will probably be like 1.33 and a bunch of other numbers). Test again, and if it doesn't crash, lower some more. Rinse and repeat. Your CPU will crash when the voltage is too low, so when that happens, go back up a step or two, test one last time to make sure it's stable, and set whatever that voltage value is to the BIOS setting.
 

Kryptix06

Proper
Aug 17, 2019
269
9
185
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This is done in the BIOS. You'd need to disable Precision Boost Overdrive and any other Game Boost overclock setting. Set your CPU frequency to 3600MHz / 3.6 GHz and your voltage to 1.35 (that's just a starting point, it can most likely go lower and temps will follow). Most everything else can stay on Auto mode, if you're more of an overclocking beginner.

If your motherboard driver program has any custom performance profiles set, I'd recommend disabling them, as they may override any BIOS changes. (not sure if ASUS has an equivalent to MSI's DragonCenter)

In order to test how low you can safely set your voltage, I'd recommend installing Ryzen Master. There, you can test all different combinations of settings. They don't permanently apply to the system though, so when you reboot your pc it will be back to however you set the BIOS.

In Ryzen Master, run a stress test with the default settings (this should be exactly as you set it in BIOS). You can set how long the test is in the program settings, and enable a temperature graph to monitor temps over time.

After the test, lower your voltage by one step (click the down arrow next to it, the next step down will probably be like 1.33 and a bunch of other numbers). Test again, and if it doesn't crash, lower some more. Rinse and repeat. Your CPU will crash when the voltage is too low, so when that happens, go back up a step or two, test one last time to make sure it's stable, and set whatever that voltage value is to the BIOS setting.
I don’t want to over clock it
 

Kryptix06

Proper
Aug 17, 2019
269
9
185
0
This is done in the BIOS. You'd need to disable Precision Boost Overdrive and any other Game Boost overclock setting. Set your CPU frequency to 3600MHz / 3.6 GHz and your voltage to 1.35 (that's just a starting point, it can most likely go lower and temps will follow). Most everything else can stay on Auto mode, if you're more of an overclocking beginner.

If your motherboard driver program has any custom performance profiles set, I'd recommend disabling them, as they may override any BIOS changes. (not sure if ASUS has an equivalent to MSI's DragonCenter)

In order to test how low you can safely set your voltage, I'd recommend installing Ryzen Master. There, you can test all different combinations of settings. They don't permanently apply to the system though, so when you reboot your pc it will be back to however you set the BIOS.

In Ryzen Master, run a stress test with the default settings (this should be exactly as you set it in BIOS). You can set how long the test is in the program settings, and enable a temperature graph to monitor temps over time.

After the test, lower your voltage by one step (click the down arrow next to it, the next step down will probably be like 1.33 and a bunch of other numbers). Test again, and if it doesn't crash, lower some more. Rinse and repeat. Your CPU will crash when the voltage is too low, so when that happens, go back up a step or two, test one last time to make sure it's stable, and set whatever that voltage value is to the BIOS setting.
I started using ryzen master and now it says its only like 40C gets as high as 50
 
Last edited:

Kryptix06

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Aug 17, 2019
269
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Stick with Ryzen Master. Other monitoring programs will wake up the sleeping cores, making them think there is a task to be done.
It idles at 40C is that normal?

Edit: When I start up rocket league it jumps up to 50C then goes back down
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
Get used to it. Ryzen 3000 has gotten the reactions it has because people are too accustomed to Intel. That behavior is normal.
With lower loads, the cpu is FREQUENTLY activating and putting cores to sleep. Those bursts are what you're seeing.
Higher power consumption and temps VS the competition at idle, but lower power consumption and temps VS the competition at full load.

You could 'fix' this behavior by setting a static frequency, but at the cost of a performance penalty.
 

Kryptix06

Proper
Aug 17, 2019
269
9
185
0
Get used to it. Ryzen 3000 has gotten the reactions it has because people are too accustomed to Intel. That behavior is normal.
With lower loads, the cpu is FREQUENTLY activating and putting cores to sleep. Those bursts are what you're seeing.
Higher power consumption and temps VS the competition at idle, but lower power consumption and temps VS the competition at full load.

You could 'fix' this behavior by setting a static frequency, but at the cost of a performance penalty.
I didn’t get the chance to benchmark but when I play gta v or something will it go above 70C from what you know?
 

Kryptix06

Proper
Aug 17, 2019
269
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Actually try it in game and see? I couldn't tell you from just the cpu alone...
If you want a worst case scenario, run it through Cinebench R20 or Asus Realbench Stress Test.
I'm at my moms and my computer is at my dads right now. I will run it through Cinibench R20 when I get back.
 
Jan 9, 2020
226
48
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I don’t want to over clock it
In a way, it's coming out of the box already overclocked. That method sets it down to it's base clock frequency, and brings the voltage down as low as possible while still being fully functional. This will bring average temps down.

If you're maxing out at 60C, then you're perfectly fine! Even going over 70 is okay. It when you start creeping up into the 80s that you should start to worry, as over 90 is when the possibility of damage begins.

Hang on why do they have the banned tag what happened
 

Kryptix06

Proper
Aug 17, 2019
269
9
185
0
In a way, it's coming out of the box already overclocked. That method sets it down to it's base clock frequency, and brings the voltage down as low as possible while still being fully functional. This will bring average temps down.

If you're maxing out at 60C, then you're perfectly fine! Even going over 70 is okay. It when you start creeping up into the 80s that you should start to worry, as over 90 is when the possibility of damage begins.

Hang on why do they have the banned tag what happened
Idk why I got a 24hr ban but I got to do some benchmarking and saw that my temps when try my hardest I could only get them into the low 70’s for a few seconds
 

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