Question CPU idling with incredibly high temperature (100 degrees C)

stephenberrelli

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Dec 26, 2018
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Overview:
Hello everyone, I have a pc I built a little over 2 years ago. Just recently I've been getting CPU readings of up to 100 degrees C.

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Current Specs:

ASUS STRIX H270F Gaming Motherboard
i7-7700k
GTX 1070 FE
8GB of DDR4 Ballistix sport ram
EVGA 650 G3 Power supply (80+ Gold // 650 watt)
NZXT Kraken x62
Standard NZXT Kraken Case fans (Came with case)
Windows 10

NOTE: All of these parts were purchased at the same time roughly 2 years ago and are in good condition.

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Overview:

All of the case fans and fans on the radiator are running at normal speeds, when the radiator is shaken liquid can be heard, the LEDs on the pump are lit normally, all of the cables are properly placed and are completely pushed in. The fans are placed properly for optimal airflow and the only part of the PC overheating is my CPU. I have ensured that the AIO is securely fastened including the radiator on the side of the case, and the pump to the CPU with the included mount. I have applied new thermal paste yet no resolution. I have also shaken the and slowly rotated the radiator and PC itself in an attempt to remove any air bubbles or resting liquid not circulating in the AIO. I have absolutely no idea what the problem is and I just want my PC running back to normal, please if you know any information as to how I can fix this issue any response below would be absolutely appreciated.

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Hopefully useful pictures:

I apologize in advance for picture quality as I didn't want to leave the PC running for an extended period so I took the pictures on my phone rather than screenshotting and am now writing this post on a laptop.

View: https://imgur.com/a/N1ZNj2Y
 
Last edited:

stephenberrelli

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Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS.

Include PSU: make, model, wattage, age (2 years?), condition.

TMPIN3 is at max. Source sensor?
I have fixed the first 2 requests however my knowledge on this sort of stuff is marginal, what exactly did you mean by source sensor?

Thanks for the response
 

86zx

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If the pc runs fine and the cpu is still at the clock speed it is supposed to be I would say it’s a hardware monitoring issue. If the air coming off of the radiator is very very hot then I’d say it’s reading accurately. Also if you have the stock air cooler that came with the cpu I’d try that just to see if it lowers the temps if it does than the pump is probably dead or not running as fast as it should
 

stephenberrelli

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If the pc runs fine and the cpu is still at the clock speed it is supposed to be I would say it’s a hardware monitoring issue. If the air coming off of the radiator is very very hot then I’d say it’s reading accurately. Also if you have the stock air cooler that came with the cpu I’d try that just to see if it lowers the temps if it does than the pump is probably dead or not running as fast as it should
I would agree with you, HOWEVER, the pc boots up normally and displays the high temps, but when I restart the pc without giving it enough time to cool off, I get an error message reading CPU Over temperature error and sure enough in the BIOS its reading 89-100 C. Unfortunately the CPU didnt come with a cooler so :/

Thanks for the response <3
 

86zx

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I would agree with you, HOWEVER, the pc boots up normally and displays the high temps, but when I restart the pc without giving it enough time to cool off, I get an error message reading CPU Over temperature error and sure enough in the BIOS its reading 89-100 C. Unfortunately the CPU didnt come with a cooler so :/

Thanks for the response <3
When you turn the pc are you able to hear the pump? There also the possibility the pumps motor became detached from the wheel meaning you would hear noise but the fluid isn’t moving. So if you can get your hands on a cheaper cooler that would be your best bet. I find it highly unlikely the ihs became dethermalcoupled from the die but that’s a rare possibility and would be the only other explanation.
 

stephenberrelli

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When you turn the pc are you able to hear the pump? There also the possibility the pumps motor became detached from the wheel meaning you would hear noise but the fluid isn’t moving. So if you can get your hands on a cheaper cooler that would be your best bet. I find it highly unlikely the ihs became dethermalcoupled from the die but that’s a rare possibility and would be the only other explanation.
I can hear the pump when the PC is booted, I made a ticket to NZXT so hopefully they will send me a new one or fix it, if that doesnt work out a new cooler will have to be the way to go. Also I'm assuming that in order to check if the motor is indeed detached I would have to open the pump up, that sounds a little sketchy to me but thanks for the feedback.
 

86zx

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I can hear the pump when the PC is booted, I made a ticket to NZXT so hopefully they will send me a new one or fix it, if that doesnt work out a new cooler will have to be the way to go. Also I'm assuming that in order to check if the motor is indeed detached I would have to open the pump up, that sounds a little sketchy to me but thanks for the feedback.
Ya that would be the only way to check sadly, hope nzxt treats you kindly.
 
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
stephenberrelli,

You have a flow problem due to a blockage, which is typical for a unit over two years old. Many AIO's fail well within that time frame. We see this scenario on our Forums every day. Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are several problems common to AIO's. Here's some information you should know about AIO's, but pay particular attention to the double red bullets:

• All AIO's will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the stator electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

• Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

• AIO's are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Even AIO's that have an effective ratio of biocide additive, gradually accumulate bio-growth over time and will eventually clog the water block and radiator, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase by several degrees over periods of several months to a few years.

• Also unlike custom loops, AIO's use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIO's may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

• • For no apparent reason ... OR ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a NEW OR OLD unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and constrict or completely stop coolant flow. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while no actual flow is present. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

• Without an actual in-line sensor, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is at least two years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are impeding coolant flow as they circulate throughout the unit. Your decision to submit an RMA request for a warranty replacement cooler was a good call.

CT :sol:
 

86zx

Upstanding
Nov 1, 2019
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stephenberrelli,

You have a flow problem due to a blockage, which is typical for a unit over two years old. Many AIO's fail well within that time frame. We see this scenario on our Forums every day. Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are several problems common to AIO's. Here's some information you should know about AIO's, but pay particular attention to the double red bullets:

• All AIO's will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the stator electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

• Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

• AIO's are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Bio-contaminants gradually accumulate over time and will eventually clog the water block and radiator, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase by several degrees over periods of several months to a few years.

• Also unlike custom loops, AIO's use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIO's may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

• • For no apparent reason ... OR ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a NEW OR OLD unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and constrict or completely stop coolant flow. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while no actual flow is present. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

• Without an actual in-line sensor, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is at least two years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are impeding coolant flow as they circulate throughout the unit. Your decision to submit an RMA request for a warranty replacement cooler was a good call.

CT :sol:
That may be true but I do think that it is more likely to be a defect I’m not sure about those specific aio’s but I’ve had a few Corsair water coolers one has been in service for 4 years with no issues and another one is a h55 7 years old handling a a10 5800k at 5ghz still works 100% no excessive pump noise or anything.
 
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
You are indeed very fortunate. However, there are always exceptions. Also, individual usage varies widely which can affect longevity, such as a few hours for a few days per week, versus 24/7.

As I previously stated, we see numerous AIO failure scenarios played out every day among all brands of coolers, as well as Corsair. Since Asetek is the manufacturer for many brands of AIO's in the marketplace, the pumps are typically common among many popular AIO models. Those of us who have been here on a daily basis for many years and specialize in analyzing temperature problems have a fairly wide knowledge base of this type of hardware failure, and are well aware of the specifics involved.

You might want to check it out for yourself:

Who manufactures pumps for all in one liquid coolers for computers?

OEMs & Brands: Who Actually Makes Your Liquid Coolers?

If you like, you are welcome to debate AIO longevity issues with a fellow Moderator, whom is a Contributing Writer, Reviewer and our resident liquid cooling expert, rubix_1011. In addition to many Tom's Hardware articles, he has also written several Stickies relating to liquid cooling that you may find interesting, which are located at the top of the Overclocking Forum.

CT :sol:
 

86zx

Upstanding
Nov 1, 2019
336
67
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You are indeed very fortunate. However, there are always exceptions. Also, individual usage varies widely which can affect longevity, such as a few hours for a few days per week, versus 24/7.

As I previously stated, we see numerous AIO failure scenarios played out every day among all brands of coolers, as well as Corsair. Since Asetek is the manufacturer for many brands of AIO's in the marketplace, the pumps are typically common among many popular AIO models. Those of us who have been here on a daily basis for many years and specialize in analyzing temperature problems have a fairly wide knowledge base of this type of hardware failure, and are well aware of the specifics involved.

You might want to check it out for yourself:

Who manufactures pumps for all in one liquid coolers for computers?

OEMs & Brands: Who Actually Makes Your Liquid Coolers?

If you like, you are welcome to debate AIO longevity issues with a fellow Moderator, whom is a Contributing Writer, Reviewer and our resident liquid cooling expert, rubix_1011. In addition to many Tom's Hardware articles, he has also written several Stickies relating to liquid cooling that you may find interesting, which are located at the top of the Overclocking Forum.

CT :sol:
The h55 has been used minimum 4hrs a day nearly every day since it’s been put in service and I do have a asetek cooler as well ( identical to the h55) from same time period that’s been fairly heavily used same situation works just fine. Also have to put into the equation every 10 on here that have an issue 10000 could be having a great experience. The majority of this forum is those who are having issues with their products your not as likely to hear a good experience.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
... Also have to put into the equation every 10 on here that have an issue 10000 could be having a great experience. The majority of this forum is those who are having issues with their products your not as likely to hear a good experience.
You made a very good point.
... I do think that it is more likely to be a defect ...
Also a good point.

While some manufacturing defects or deficiencies require a considerable amount of time to be revealed, with respect to the cooling issue stephenberrelli is experiencing, I think we nevertheless agree that it's clearly an AIO problem, and that he made a good call in requesting an RMA replacement.

For the benefit of other Forum Members and our visiting readers who are AIO users, I'd like to reiterate that all AIO's will eventually fail ... it's not a question of if ... it's a question of when. So to eliminate downtime, it's advisable to keep an air cooler on hand as a backup until you can replace your AIO.

CT :sol:
 
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stephenberrelli

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Dec 26, 2018
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Hello everyone and thank you for all of this useful information, for some reason today when I had a friend come over to take a look at it there was no issue at all. Normal temperatures were posted at idling and under stress testing. I have no idea what had happened as I had done absolutely nothing to the PC, I can only assume that it was his mere presence that scared the AIO back into function.

I still need to find the receipt for the cooler in order to request an RMA and will definitely continue to due so just in case this issue arises again.

Thanks again.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
You can be certain that the problem will recur. Sometimes simply by stopping and starting, the initial surge of water pressure will dislodge a blockage. However, once it's free to again circulate, it's only a matter of time before it finds its way into the same constricted area where it originally lodged and created the blockage.

Blockages are typically caused by sediments created through galvanic corrosion (dissimilar metals - copper waterblock / aluminum radiator) and / or the accumulation of biogrowth. This YouTube explains the problem:

Something Growing in Liquid Coolers | Enermax Liqtech I Failure Analysis

Although these coolers are not NZXT, the principles and problems are common among AIO's.

CT :sol:
 

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