Jun 7, 2023
4
1
15
Howdy,

tldr: My CPU is overheating a lot. Do I need a better fan, or is something else going on?

I'm a 3d game artist who was long overdue for a PC upgrade. I finally got a new build up and running, but things haven't been great so far. It seems that the CPU is really struggling with tasks that my old PC could handle no problem.

First off, here's the list of components.
I don't exactly know which data is relevant, so I've linked a pair of screenshots from Ryzen Master showing all the details of what's going on with the CPU. Maybe it's overkill, but I want to make things easier for you kind folks.
View: https://imgur.com/a/MrpOfBU

The top screenshot is showing what happens when I render a single frame of a very simple scene in Blender. I'm worried something is wrong here, but I don't understand most of those numbers so I can't really tell. This is a very simple and quick operation which I ordinarily wouldn't even think twice about. I'm really no expert, but I just know in my gut this shouldn't be making the CPU go up past 70C, especially considering my dinosaur of an old PC could handle rendering fluid simulations without breaking a sweat, even if it was very slow. The lower screenshot is showing how the CPU is running with just Chrome open while I write this post.

I'm hoping you'll tell me my cooling solution is simply not good enough, but I'm worried something else is happening here. I'll happily buy a liquid cooler if it'll help, but I don't want to waste any money if that's not actually going to help. I haven't installed much of the software I need on this new PC yet because I'm afraid it won't be up to the task. I wanted a PC which could handle things like Zbrush and Unreal Engine, but just trying to start the Unreal Editor was causing the PC to shut itself down. Is this a hardware incompatibility? Is this some problem with Windows 11? Is this normal behaviour? Am I imagining problems where there are none? I really have no idea. It's just all very disheartening.

I've been able to run Halo CE remastered, which seemed to work fine, and I've been able to run Minecraft, though it does make the fans roar. I've also tried the cpux.net stress test, but it really couldn't handle that. It overheats every time. I've been reluctant to try the stress test again because I barely have time to consider the numbers before the PC shuts down.

I chose my components based on recommended lists from Logical Increments and pcpartpicker.com. Everything seemed to be nice and compatible. I've double checked the TDP rating of the Noctua fan--or Noctua's version of TDP-- and it seems to be fully compatible. Noctua claims this fan is appropriate for overclocking this CPU. I did buy a second fan which I attached to the free side of the heatsink, and that seemed to help a little bit, but I fear that's just treating the symptoms and not the illness.

I should state that I've made no attempt to overclock or change any default settings for any of the hardware. I don't know how to do that sort of thing so I'm not gonna mess with it.

Thank you so much for your time. Any feedback at all is deeply appreciated. I'll do my best to respond to any questions in a timely manner.
 
Last edited:

IDProG

Distinguished
Howdy,

tldr: My CPU is overheating a lot. Do I need a better fan, or is something else going on?

I'm a 3d game artist who was long overdue for a PC upgrade. I finally got a new build up and running, but things haven't been great so far. It seems that the CPU is really struggling with tasks that my old PC could handle no problem.

First off, here's the list of components.
I don't exactly know which data is relevant, so I've linked a pair of screenshots from Ryzen Master showing all the details of what's going on with the CPU. Maybe it's overkill, but I want to make things easier for you kind folks.
View: https://imgur.com/a/MrpOfBU

The top screenshot is showing what happens when I render a single frame of a very simple scene in Blender. I'm worried something is wrong here, but I don't understand most of those numbers so I can't really tell. This is a very simple and quick operation which I ordinarily wouldn't even think twice about. I'm really no expert, but I just know in my gut this shouldn't be making the CPU go up past 70C, especially considering my dinosaur of an old PC could handle rendering fluid simulations without breaking a sweat, even if it was very slow. The lower screenshot is showing how the CPU is running with just Chrome open while I write this post.

I'm hoping you'll tell me my cooling solution is simply not good enough, but I'm worried something else is happening here. I'll happily buy a liquid cooler if it'll help, but I don't want to waste any money if that's not actually going to help. I haven't installed much of the software I need on this new PC yet because I'm afraid it won't be up to the task. I wanted a PC which could handle things like Zbrush and Unreal Engine, but just trying to start the Unreal Editor was causing the PC to shut itself down. Is this a hardware incompatibility? Is this some problem with Windows 11? Is this normal behaviour? Am I imagining problems where there are none? I really have no idea. It's just all very disheartening.

I've been able to run Halo CE remastered, which seemed to work fine, and I've been able to run Minecraft, though it does make the fans roar. I've also tried the cpux.net stress test, but it really couldn't handle that. It overheats every time. I've been reluctant to try the stress test again because I barely have time to consider the numbers before the PC shuts down.

I chose my components based on recommended lists from Logical Increments and pcpartpicker.com. Everything seemed to be nice and compatible. I've double checked the TDP rating of the Noctua fan--or Noctua's version of TDP-- and it seems to be fully compatible. Noctua claims this fan is appropriate for overclocking this CPU. I did buy a second fan which I attached to the free side of the heatsink, and that seemed to help a little bit, but I fear that's just treating the symptoms and not the illness.

I should state that I've made no attempt to overclock or change any default settings for any of the hardware. I don't know how to do that sort of thing so I'm not gonna mess with it.

Thank you so much for your time. Any feedback at all is deeply appreciated. I'll do my best to respond to any questions in a timely manner.
I am also an owner of the 7600X.

I use a more powerful air cooler than you, the Thermalright Peerless Assassin.

Yes, it indeed gets VERY hot. At stock, it gets to 5.4GHz for, like, 10 seconds, then throttles to 4.9GHz to reduce the temp to 95°C.

Try undervolting the CPU. I can get to 4.7GHz @ 1V. The CPU gets decently cool. Full stress test only gets it to 77°C.
 
Jun 7, 2023
4
1
15
I am also an owner of the 7600X.

I use a more powerful air cooler than you, the Thermalright Peerless Assassin.

Yes, it indeed gets VERY hot. At stock, it gets to 5.4GHz for, like, 10 seconds, then throttles to 4.9GHz to reduce the temp to 95°C.

Try undervolting the CPU. I can get to 4.7GHz @ 1V. The CPU gets decently cool. Full stress test only gets it to 77°C.
I'll give that a try, thank you.
 

Anon#1234

Proper
May 30, 2023
108
29
120
I am also an owner of the 7600X.

I use a more powerful air cooler than you, the Thermalright Peerless Assassin.

Yes, it indeed gets VERY hot. At stock, it gets to 5.4GHz for, like, 10 seconds, then throttles to 4.9GHz to reduce the temp to 95°C.

Try undervolting the CPU. I can get to 4.7GHz @ 1V. The CPU gets decently cool. Full stress test only gets it to 77°C.
I got the peerless assassin for like 30$, amazing cooler for the price.
 
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The Noctua U12S is a pretty good HSF (heatsink fan) but there are some things you should know about Ryzen 7XXX CPUs. They all try to boost as high and for as long as possible until reaching 95C. They will maintain the highest possible clocks while at this temperature while you are running intensive programs for the best performance. You said you are getting shutdowns from the temperature which is odd because what is supposed to happen is the CPU clocks itself down to avoid that. This can happen however if you mounted the HSF badly, did not apply thermal paste, left a protective plastic film on the HSF, or did not apply even pressure from the HSF to the CPU IHS (integrated heat spreader) via screwing down the HSF. When you screw down a HSF to the IHS you want to do 1 full rotation of the screws and corner to corner until they are hand tight. Remember not to over tighten, as this can damage components. You may want to make sure that the second fan that you installed is not blowing air opposed to the first fan as well. I would recommend taking a look at the installation of the HSF and go through the above advice.

These three coolers are the best ones for the money and better that what you have for thermals, not noise, in order of great to best from Thermalright:
 
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Jun 7, 2023
4
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15
The Noctua U12S is a pretty good HSF (heatsink fan) but there are some things you should know about Ryzen 7XXX CPUs. They all try to boost as high and for as long as possible until reaching 95C. They will maintain the highest possible clocks while at this temperature while you are running intensive programs for the best performance. You said you are getting shutdowns from the temperature which is odd because what is supposed to happen is the CPU clocks itself down to avoid that. This can happen however if you mounted the HSF badly, did not apply thermal paste, left a protective plastic film on the HSF, or did not apply even pressure from the HSF to the CPU IHS (integrated heat spreader) via screwing down the HSF. When you screw down a HSF to the IHS you want to do 1 full rotation of the screws and corner to corner until they are hand tight. Remember not to over tighten, as this can damage components. You may want to make sure that the second fan that you installed is not blowing air opposed to the first fan as well. I would recommend taking a look at the installation of the HSF and go through the above advice.

These three coolers are the best ones for the money and better that what you have for thermals, not noise, in order of great to best from Thermalright:
That is good to know. I'll take another look at it. I'm quite sure I did all those steps, but I might've messed up the screw tightness. Thanks very much for the info.
 
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Howdy,

tldr: My CPU is overheating a lot. Do I need a better fan, or is something else going on?

I'm a 3d game artist who was long overdue for a PC upgrade. I finally got a new build up and running, but things haven't been great so far. It seems that the CPU is really struggling with tasks that my old PC could handle no problem.

First off, here's the list of components.
I don't exactly know which data is relevant, so I've linked a pair of screenshots from Ryzen Master showing all the details of what's going on with the CPU. Maybe it's overkill, but I want to make things easier for you kind folks.
View: https://imgur.com/a/MrpOfBU

The top screenshot is showing what happens when I render a single frame of a very simple scene in Blender. I'm worried something is wrong here, but I don't understand most of those numbers so I can't really tell. This is a very simple and quick operation which I ordinarily wouldn't even think twice about. I'm really no expert, but I just know in my gut this shouldn't be making the CPU go up past 70C, especially considering my dinosaur of an old PC could handle rendering fluid simulations without breaking a sweat, even if it was very slow. The lower screenshot is showing how the CPU is running with just Chrome open while I write this post.

I'm hoping you'll tell me my cooling solution is simply not good enough, but I'm worried something else is happening here. I'll happily buy a liquid cooler if it'll help, but I don't want to waste any money if that's not actually going to help. I haven't installed much of the software I need on this new PC yet because I'm afraid it won't be up to the task. I wanted a PC which could handle things like Zbrush and Unreal Engine, but just trying to start the Unreal Editor was causing the PC to shut itself down. Is this a hardware incompatibility? Is this some problem with Windows 11? Is this normal behaviour? Am I imagining problems where there are none? I really have no idea. It's just all very disheartening.

I've been able to run Halo CE remastered, which seemed to work fine, and I've been able to run Minecraft, though it does make the fans roar. I've also tried the cpux.net stress test, but it really couldn't handle that. It overheats every time. I've been reluctant to try the stress test again because I barely have time to consider the numbers before the PC shuts down.

I chose my components based on recommended lists from Logical Increments and pcpartpicker.com. Everything seemed to be nice and compatible. I've double checked the TDP rating of the Noctua fan--or Noctua's version of TDP-- and it seems to be fully compatible. Noctua claims this fan is appropriate for overclocking this CPU. I did buy a second fan which I attached to the free side of the heatsink, and that seemed to help a little bit, but I fear that's just treating the symptoms and not the illness.

I should state that I've made no attempt to overclock or change any default settings for any of the hardware. I don't know how to do that sort of thing so I'm not gonna mess with it.

Thank you so much for your time. Any feedback at all is deeply appreciated. I'll do my best to respond to any questions in a timely manner.

Yea its just the difference in power draw of the cpu. Its struggling because its just getting hot.. better cooler or a underclock should help.

In my opinion though, whats the point of having a new nice cpu if your just gonna nerf it back to your old cpu anyways? Use the undervolt/underclock as a short term solution and definitely look into better cooling so you can get the full performance of your cpu.
 
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
That is good to know. I'll take another look at it. I'm quite sure I did all those steps, but I might've messed up the screw tightness. Thanks very much for the info.

I think that is the source of your issues. Noctua coolers are amazing and I don't have any thermal issues with my Ryzen.
 
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
The U12s is a far cry from the NH-D15.

Well yeah... ;) Single 120mm fan... $54.95 but it's still 5 star rated over at PCPP along with the non-redux version which has many more 5 star reviews for $90.

Terrible cooler? Definitely not... but all I seem to hear about lately is the Peerless Assassin for $30. I get trying to save money and all but I'm not the type to throw a $30 cooler on a $400/$500/$600/$700 CPU. That would be like buying a Porsche and putting $50 tires on it.

OP said he bought a 2nd fan.

I did buy a second fan which I attached to the free side of the heatsink, and that seemed to help a little bit, but I fear that's just treating the symptoms and not the illness.

I'm hoping you'll tell me my cooling solution is simply not good enough, but I'm worried something else is happening here. I'll happily buy a liquid cooler if it'll help, but I don't want to waste any money if that's not actually going to help.

That cooler "should" be adequate especially if you have 2 fans on it but as I said in my first post check your installation. At any rate I can tell you that I've have spent more on the cooler. I spent $120 on the NH-D15 and my 7950x3D hasn't sniffed 90C yet under 30 min all core burn tests with everyday use temps in the 60-70C range. Less power draw I know... but still no thermal issues to speak of.

At any rate... you shouldn't need an AIO.
 

Misgar

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Mar 2, 2023
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The 7600X power rating is a nominal 105W without overclocking, versus the 7950X's 170W. As such the NH-U12S should cope, provided it is correctly installed. Are your case fans extracting the heat from the CPU/GPU?

I use an NH-D15 on my 7950X and CPUID HWMonitor reports 184W running Handbrake video conversion. Other video software (Topaz Video AI, Adobe Premiere Pro, DaVinci Resolve, etc) leverage the GPU more than the CPU.

I should point out I do not have PBO or EXPO enabled in the BIOS. If you have PBO 2 enabled, the BIOS will push the CPU as hard as possible at 95C. If you want lower temperatures and have not mastered under-volting, turn off PBO.

A triple fan 360mm water system will eke out a few more MHz on the latest CPUs (i9-13900K, 7950X), but a quality air cooler is adequate in many situations.

If your system is shutting down on overheat, remove the cooler, check the coverage of TIM (heatsink compound) is thin and even. Remove all traces of TIM, reapply TIM (not too much), tighten heatsink screws (alternate corners) then retest.

Also check you're not inadvertently applying PBO overclock.
 
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What was your old processor?

The Noctua NH-U12s redux is a budget version of the NH-U12s.
The supplied fan is not the same as the more expensive NH-U12s.
It comes with paste applied. That is good for just a single mount.If you need to remount you will need to buy paste. Do not try to reuse paste.
Still, performance should be similar.

For better cooling, look at NH-D15 or NH-D15s.

If you need more than that, you are looking at a 360 or larger aio and that will not fit in your case.

Your case looks to be a good one for air cooling. Are the two front 140mm intake fans running?
 
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