CPU keeps downclocking after system shutdown

Kube

Honorable
Jul 14, 2013
50
0
10,660
12
Hello all, I've been having a problem with my overclock. Every time i shut down the PC the clock speed of my processor drops to 4.1Ghz. It's currently set to 4.4Ghz in the bios and is stable at that point but every time i shut down, the clock speed decreases until i load the bios and It goes up again without me changing anything. This change only happens when i completely shut down, not just restart.

Any help on why or how to fix this would be appreciated as its frustrating.

thanks.

System Specs:
CPU: I5 6600K
Mobo: Gigabyte - GA-Z170X-Gaming 5
Graphics Card: Asus Strix 1080 Ti
Overclock: 4.4Ghz at 1.315v
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, depending on the bios version I guess, that board should have auto, standard, high and extreme. Use the + and - keys to change values if entering the value by name, with capitalization (Required for some settings) on the first letter of the word. I used standard for my 4.5OC and it was acceptable. I did however change to a Hero VIII because of that setting and the fact that DRAM voltage was only adjustable by .020v steps rather than the standard .005v steps like most manufacturers have. Like Gigabyte USED to have.

What are you using to monitor? My recommendation would be HWinfo. Run "Sensors only" and only Sensors only. It will be an option when opening the program. Put a check next to that setting alone.

Core Temp is also very good for core temps and voltage, but it lacks the expansiveness of HWinfo.

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. Always select the "Sensors only" option when running HWinfo.

In cases where it is relevant and you are seeking help, then in order to help you, it's often necessary to SEE what's going on, in the event one of us can pick something out that seems out of place, or other indicators that just can't be communicated via a text only post. In these cases, posting an image of the HWinfo sensors or something else can be extremely helpful. That may not be the case in YOUR thread, but if it is then the information at the following link will show you how to do that:

*How to post images in Tom's hardware forums



Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.

*Download HWinfo


For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:

*Download Core Temp

Make sure you have the latest bios version installed.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First, I'd try installing a new CMOS battery. The current battery is likely AT LEAST 3 years old, and probably more than that as they've usually been sitting in a stock bin for some time before they are installed in a given board. CMOS battery stock at motherboard manufacturers could already be several years old before they're ever installed in a board, so potentially that could already be as much as five to seven years old. Usually this is not the case, but I have seen it happen a few times.

It would definitely account for the loss of settings. It could also be that you have a configuration problem and do not have fast boot and DRAM fast boot enabled. I would make sure both of those are enabled. Otherwise, if fast boot is not enabled it can try to retrain the system every time. It could also be that your overclock is not stable, and the system is encountering a problem from a cold boot and is resetting the configuration but usually you would see this happen even during a restart if it was the problem.

I have that exact board, as well as a Hero VIII, with a 6700k, and that actually seems like a rather low voltage for that frequency unless you have a very high LLC setting. Every chip is different though so it may be stable with 1.315v. Might want to verify that though by running Realbench for 8 hours. That's pretty much the best current stability test you can run when trying to validate CPU overclock settings.

 

Kube

Honorable
Jul 14, 2013
50
0
10,660
12


Thanks for the quick response.

I'll check the battery first. The overclock is new and i had to reset the CMOS by taking it out due to a bad setting.

I've been using Prime95 and Intel CPU burn to stress test, but I've been looking for a better program. I'll give Realbench a shot.

This is the first time i've overclocked with this bios and its LLC setting was a bit confusing as it only has high and standard and no real explanation to which setting did what. I've left it on auto for the overclock but monitored my vcore in HWiNFO64. It's pretty solid as far as fluctuations having a delta of 0.06v. The one thing that has been confusing is that i will get random spikes in vcore that seem to be in error as randomly it will give a reading as high as 2.6v. It seems to be a bug in the monitoring software as even while stressing the system and normal use the voltage remains steady.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, depending on the bios version I guess, that board should have auto, standard, high and extreme. Use the + and - keys to change values if entering the value by name, with capitalization (Required for some settings) on the first letter of the word. I used standard for my 4.5OC and it was acceptable. I did however change to a Hero VIII because of that setting and the fact that DRAM voltage was only adjustable by .020v steps rather than the standard .005v steps like most manufacturers have. Like Gigabyte USED to have.

What are you using to monitor? My recommendation would be HWinfo. Run "Sensors only" and only Sensors only. It will be an option when opening the program. Put a check next to that setting alone.

Core Temp is also very good for core temps and voltage, but it lacks the expansiveness of HWinfo.

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. Always select the "Sensors only" option when running HWinfo.

In cases where it is relevant and you are seeking help, then in order to help you, it's often necessary to SEE what's going on, in the event one of us can pick something out that seems out of place, or other indicators that just can't be communicated via a text only post. In these cases, posting an image of the HWinfo sensors or something else can be extremely helpful. That may not be the case in YOUR thread, but if it is then the information at the following link will show you how to do that:

*How to post images in Tom's hardware forums



Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.

*Download HWinfo


For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:

*Download Core Temp

Make sure you have the latest bios version installed.
 

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