Question CPU not detected

Aug 23, 2019
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I'm having a huge issue with my computer. My Specs are:

Motherboard: MSI AMD MPG X570 GAMING EDGE WIFI
CPU: Ryzen 5 2600X
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16GB (1x16GB) DDR4 3200Mhz
PSU: Cooler Master MWE Gold 650W 80 Plus Gold
Video card: MSI NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 GAMING Z 6GB
Boot Drive: Samsung 970 EVO PLUS 250GB M.2 NVMe

The issue I'm having is to do with my CPU or Motherboard and I'm not quite sure which. After building my pc I had an issue with my DRAM not being detected. I rebuilt the pc outside of the case and went through troubleshooting it (cleared CMOS, updating the bios and testing other RAM in the system in different DIMM slots and confirming the RAM worked in another system), and it still wasn't detected. I took out the Boot Drive and rebuilt my PC again and now the EZ debug light shows the CPU isn't detected, and the issue with the DRAM is gone.

What else can I possibly do to troubleshoot while I wait to RMA my parts and which one do you think is broken, CPU or Motherboard?
 

CRITICALThinker

Honorable
Feb 2, 2014
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With AMD cpu's, the possibility is a bent pin on the CPU. Look for that since you seem to have already taken the first step of reseating the processor (unless you haven't, try that first). Motherboards are generally the first culprit when troubleshooting, but the possibility of a CPU issue isn't impossible.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First of all, did you plug the EPS 12v 8 pin CPU power connector into the motherboard? And, are you sure you used the correct one, and not one of the 8 pin connectors for the graphics card? Have to ask that, because we've seen it enough times here for it to be a real possibility. Not that I think that's what you've done, but it's always good to not overlook anything in these situations.

A bent pin IS the most probable cause, but it certainly isn't the only possibility. If all connections are made, and made correctly, then checking the CPU for bent pins would probably be the very next step.

Also, so long as you're troubleshooting, you don't need to connect ANY drives or other hardware in order to get the system to POST and get into the BIOS. You can worry about other hardware like drives, RGB controllers, etc., later. All you need is the CPU, motherboard, memory, graphics card and power supply, for now. Disconnect everything else. You don't even need a case, as you know, you can jump the pwr pins on the motherboard to trigger the system to start up.

If the CPU is ok, no bent pins, and the memory is fully seated in the CORRECT slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU if you are using two modules, then it's likely you have a faulty motherboard.

It's probably also worth double checking to see that the 24 pin ATX connector is FULLY seated, at both ends. I've seen some weird issues where a couple of builders thought they were fully seated, but one end wasn't completely down, and ghost problems ensued.

Are you using the stock cooler or an aftermarket CPU cooler? This could be important, because I've also seen a NUMBER of systems where somebody has cranked down the CPU cooler too tight, and experienced either or CPU and memory problems.

Since you have the motherboard out of the case, I'm going to assume this isn't an issue with a loose screw shorting something out on the back of the motherboard against the case, but you might want to check to see that none of the standoffs were in the wrong place in the motherboard tray of the case, and didn't short the board while it was installed.
 
Aug 23, 2019
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First of all, did you plug the EPS 12v 8 pin CPU power connector into the motherboard? And, are you sure you used the correct one, and not one of the 8 pin connectors for the graphics card? Have to ask that, because we've seen it enough times here for it to be a real possibility. Not that I think that's what you've done, but it's always good to not overlook anything in these situations.

A bent pin IS the most probable cause, but it certainly isn't the only possibility. If all connections are made, and made correctly, then checking the CPU for bent pins would probably be the very next step.

Also, so long as you're troubleshooting, you don't need to connect ANY drives or other hardware in order to get the system to POST and get into the BIOS. You can worry about other hardware like drives, RGB controllers, etc., later. All you need is the CPU, motherboard, memory, graphics card and power supply, for now. Disconnect everything else. You don't even need a case, as you know, you can jump the pwr pins on the motherboard to trigger the system to start up.

If the CPU is ok, no bent pins, and the memory is fully seated in the CORRECT slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU if you are using two modules, then it's likely you have a faulty motherboard.

It's probably also worth double checking to see that the 24 pin ATX connector is FULLY seated, at both ends. I've seen some weird issues where a couple of builders thought they were fully seated, but one end wasn't completely down, and ghost problems ensued.

Are you using the stock cooler or an aftermarket CPU cooler? This could be important, because I've also seen a NUMBER of systems where somebody has cranked down the CPU cooler too tight, and experienced either or CPU and memory problems.

Since you have the motherboard out of the case, I'm going to assume this isn't an issue with a loose screw shorting something out on the back of the motherboard against the case, but you might want to check to see that none of the standoffs were in the wrong place in the motherboard tray of the case, and didn't short the board while it was installed.
I plugged in the CPU cable correctly, the CPU cable splits halfway through to form 2x2 on the motherboard side, and the tab clips onto the right side.

I've checked the CPU a few times to double-check that they are all straight, and they seem so to me. To what degree does a CPU pin count as bent?

I don't have any RGB plugged in, the only other thing I have plugged in is the case to turn it on and the SSD. I'm not quite sure where the pins are to start the pc.

I'll grab a pick of the 24 pin ATX connector to show what it looks like. I cant plug it in fully by about 1.5mm's, could this be the issue?

I'm using an aftermarket CPU cooler. At first it was a bit tight when in the case, but if loosened it a lot outside of it.

Lastly, there was also a standoff I didn't screw in when originally screwing in my motherboard.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I plugged in the CPU cable correctly, the CPU cable splits halfway through to form 2x2 on the motherboard side, and the tab clips onto the right side.
Not sure what this means. 2x2? The EPS connector should plug in at the very top of the board in between the VRM heatsink and the rear I/O shield cover. There is an 8 pin and a 4 pin EPS socket located there. You NEED to at least have the 8 pin EPS connector connected. If you have a power supply with 2 EPS 8 pin connectors (Again, do not confuse these with the 8 pin PCI, PEG or VGA (Which are all the same thing but labeled differently on some power supplies) connectors. They are keyed differently, meaning the shape of the plastic around the actual pins. Think square peg in round hole, or half square half round peg in square hole type thing. ) it would be advisable to go ahead and split the connector in half, it should just "snap" right in two easily, and use the full 8 pin and the 4 pin.

If your PSU only has one EPS connector, which is most PSUs, then just use the single 4+4 (8 pin) EPS connector in that 8 pin socket to the left of the 4 pin socket at the top edge of the motherboard.



I've checked the CPU a few times to double-check that they are all straight, and they seem so to me. To what degree does a CPU pin count as bent?
Bent is bent. If a pin is not 100% straight, at a complete 90° angle to the flat surface of the CPU itself, then it is bent. Any deviation from completely straight could be a problem. If nothing "looks" bent, and you may need to use a magnifying glass or high powered reading glasses to get a good look, then it's probably not. Make absolutely sure you have aligned the CPU correctly in the socket with the notches or alignment marks correctly lined up with the matching ones on the CPU socket.

I don't have any RGB plugged in, the only other thing I have plugged in is the case to turn it on and the SSD. I'm not quite sure where the pins are to start the pc.
The two pins that the power leads from the front of the case are connected to, are the same pins you would use to jump start the motherboard without it being connected to the case switch. pwr + and pwr -. If you disconnect from the case, you can use a small flat tipped screwdriver to briefly touch those two pins together, shorting them, which should trigger the PSU to turn on and power on the system. Be careful not to touch OTHER pins with the screwdriver when doing this, if you do this. You can simply use the case if the cables are long enough to not make it a PITA.

I'll grab a pick of the 24 pin ATX connector to show what it looks like. I cant plug it in fully by about 1.5mm's, could this be the issue?
Remove the ATX connector and make sure none of the pins on the connector are bent or squashed. Check the socket as well. If you can't seat it fully to where the lock tabs click into place on the retaining tabs, then it's not seated.


Lastly, there was also a standoff I didn't screw in when originally screwing in my motherboard.
Was this standoff installed into the motherboard of the tray, but not fastened to the motherboard, because it was in a location under the board that did not line up with any of the standoff holes in the motherboard, or did you not install it in the motherboard tray on the case and so there was just one standoff that wasn't installed at all? If there were ANY standoffs screwed into the case that did not line up with matching holes in the motherboard, then that could have shorted something out on the board. A missing standoff is undesirable, but won't cause problems or short anything out. It will simply allow the board to flex and COULD cause damage to the motherboard later on. Not a big deal, but definitely something you don't want to leave that way permanently.
 

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