CPU overheating and CPU fan @ around 4200 RPM

Jason761

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I used the original mobo (IPIBL-lb) that came with HP and the fan was pretty quiet and the temp was around 30-40oC. Now since I changed the fan and mobo to P5KPL-CM the fan was very loud. The temperature was around 40-50oC. Is this normal for a CPU?
 

Zinosys

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Anything >70˚C is fine, but the lower, the better.

Did you use the stock cooler or an aftermarket cooler?
Is the heatsink firmly mounted to the CPU (but not to the point that your CPU is being squashed!)?
Did you apply a small amount of thermal paste/TIM between the heatsink and CPU? Or was the TIM pre-applied?

Cheers.
 

Jason761

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Yes I am using the stock cooler (coolermaster)
I am not sure if it is firmly mounted but I can tell you the psu wires is overloading the case.
I did not apply it I gave it to some technician to replace the mobo.
 

Zinosys

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About a minute or two into the test should be fine. You don't want to run the risk of damaging your CPU, but at the same time you want an accurate measurement.

Five minutes in should be good. :)
 
What alot of people forget about is the ambient temperature in your room will affect the temps. Just as little as a 5degrees difference in room temperature can throw your temps up 10 degrees. So when you are looking at your temps from day to day its a good idea to log the room temperature too. This is so often overlooked especially if you are going from one season to another.
 

Zinosys

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Alright, this might be a better, and more clear way of doing it. (to me at least. It's my stupid way, but I understand it. :p)

Get a copy of Prime95 and HWMonitor.

prime:
http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft/
hwmonitor:
http://www.cpuid.com/hwmonitor.php

Write down the temp at idle, then start prime95 on all threads/cores, then take the temp every minute for five minutes.

Besides, I trust HWmonitor more than any other application (other than Everest) for sensors. But if you happen to have a fluke 116 lying around, then you can slap on your type-K thermocouple and get to work.

:p Cheers.
 

Jason761

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I do use HWmonitor i changed from asus utlities to this one.
Btw this one is open case. When its close it might go up 10 or 5.
Core 1 44°C
Core 2 45°C
Core 3 43°C
Core 4 42°C
Using Prime95
1 minute
Core 1 61°C
Core 2 61°C
Core 3 61°C
Core 4 59°C
2 minute
Core 1 65°C
Core 2 63°C
Core 3 62°C
Core 4 60°C
3 minute
Core 1 67°C
Core 2 66°C
Core 3 66°C
Core 4 62°C
4 minute
Core 1 70°C
Core 2 70°C
Core 3 69°C
Core 4 68°C
5 minute
Core 1 72°C
Core 2 71°C
Core 3 70°C
Core 4 69°C
 

Zinosys

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Wow, nice!

Okay. So, those temps should be fine, but they could be a bit lower. If you're brave enough to reseat the heatsink, then you can go ahead and try that. Make sure there is a thin layer of thermal compound between the heatsink and the processor.

My threshold for Prime (because it is more than the average 100% load), is 76-78˚C.
Normal Load (encoding, Virtualization), my threshold is 72-74˚C.

Idle, those could be a bit lower. Open and 45˚C might be a problem, but it's well within the tolerance zone.

So, really nice job on recording the temps, that helps a lot! The bottom line is: if you want to, go ahead and try to reseat your heatsink. Make sure there is thermal compound between the HSF and processor. The best is to use an aftermarket compound like Arctic Silver 5, Arctic Cooling MX-3, and (my favorite) Shin-Etsu X23-7783D. :D

If you don't want to bother reseating the heatsink, then you should be fine anyhow.

Cheers, and good luck!
 

Jason761

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Oh yeah and btw i should show you a picture inside me pc. ITs a bit messy.
Jason761
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Zinosys

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Wow, I'm at a loss for words. O.O

Yes, doing a bit of cable management (in this case), no pun intended :D, will probably decrease your temps more than 10 degrees. :D

It's surprising what a good cable management job can do. I remember when I had two ide cables, four PCI cards, and three scsi chains in my P4 system xD. I did some cable management, and my temps went down by more than 15C.

Cheers.
 

Zinosys

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Eh, uhmm... Is it possible that you can route the cables through an empty expansion bay, let the slack stay there, and them run them out? That's one of the things I did. Other than that, I don't know. I'm used to regular ATX, not micro ATX, and smaller things are more challenging.

You can try to run the USB header cables under the mobo tray, then bring them back up. You can also try to put a few PSU wires under the PCI slots, (but don't obstruct the airflow of your GPU cooler!)

Is that PSU modular? Doubt it, but if so, you can detach some unused cables.

The main thing you should try is experiment. That's what really solved my problem. Try routing cables here and there, and bundling them together when the run in parallel.

Well, sorry for the lame answer :p, but cheers.
 

Jason761

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I am using a HP computer case. Thats all the HP stuff that i have everything else ive upgradeed. And how do i check if its a PSU modular. I need to know how i could do all this stuff.
And btw i have this psu http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/product.php?product_id=2895
 

Zinosys

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Uhmm, see if you can undo the strap around the power cables, and route them from drive to drive, bundling them where possible. The excess cable will go in an empty drive bay or under your graphics card. If your case has cable management holes (which I doubt because it's a brand-name case) you can route the wires through them.