Question CPU overheating

Daytona Beach

Prominent
Aug 3, 2017
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So I bought a XFX R9 280 today to replace my GTX 1050, a lot bigger in size without a doubt. But when I installed it and the drivers, my CPU now overheats. I've reapplied thermal paste twice now, made sure the fan was level on the CPU, and took the side panel off to see if there was a temp change. (Which there was not)
I seen it may be due to bad airflow, but my entire computer is cold. The GPU itself is cold even though it shows at 60c, the heatsink for the CPU is cold, the case is cold, etc.
I don't understand why the CPU idles at 72/80c and under pressure runs at 77/80c. Very rarely did I see it hit 90c but my PC didn't stutter nor shut off.
This only happened after I installed my new GPU but only after about an hour of nothing, I installed it and left the PC idle for awhile and it stayed around 50ish, now it idles at 72/80 and I'm not sure why.

I have the stock cooler for a Ryzen 5 2600, and with the GTX 1050 it stayed around 30c even under pressure.
 

Daytona Beach

Prominent
Aug 3, 2017
19
1
525
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The 280 isnt to far behind on a lot surprisingly, it out performs my 1050, fps and texture wise, at least for me. The 1050 has been causing lag. The temps were spiking to 100c randomly so I switched it out. And I used speccy and cpuz.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, use Ryzen master. Speccy sucks. CPU-Z sucks, except for basic system information and some memory specs. You would be a lot better off, for any system, to use HWinfo (NOT HWmonitor), Core Temp or in the case of Ryzen platforms, Ryzen master. Speccy was antiquated before Ryzen was even a thing, and is rarely updated. It's doubtful the information you're seeing in Speccy is even remotely accurate. It's possible, but doubtful. It's also highly unlikely Speccy accounts for the 20°C offset on the X Skus, although yours isn't.

There is no logical reason I can think of why changing out the graphics card would cause a change in CPU temperature unless the cooler mount was physically altered somehow such as one of the retainers getting jarred loose or broken, or a seriously off kilter driver problem.

I'd recommend you look at all of the following:

Here are the first steps to take when trying to solve these kinds of hardware problems. If you have already tried these steps, all of them, exactly as outlined, we can move along to more advanced solutions.

If there are any you have NOT done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.


First, make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.

Second, go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.

IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.

The last thing we want to look at, for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.

If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

Here are the full instructions on running the Display driver uninstaller and CLEAN installing new drivers.

Graphics card CLEAN install tutorial using the DDU
 

Daytona Beach

Prominent
Aug 3, 2017
19
1
525
1
Yes, use Ryzen master. Speccy sucks. CPU-Z sucks, except for basic system information and some memory specs. You would be a lot better off, for any system, to use HWinfo (NOT HWmonitor), Core Temp or in the case of Ryzen platforms, Ryzen master. Speccy was antiquated before Ryzen was even a thing, and is rarely updated. It's doubtful the information you're seeing in Speccy is even remotely accurate. It's possible, but doubtful. It's also highly unlikely Speccy accounts for the 20°C offset on the X Skus, although yours isn't.

There is no logical reason I can think of why changing out the graphics card would cause a change in CPU temperature unless the cooler mount was physically altered somehow such as one of the retainers getting jarred loose or broken, or a seriously off kilter driver problem.

I'd recommend you look at all of the following:

Here are the first steps to take when trying to solve these kinds of hardware problems. If you have already tried these steps, all of them, exactly as outlined, we can move along to more advanced solutions.

If there are any you have NOT done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.


First, make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.

Second, go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.

IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.

The last thing we want to look at, for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.

If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

Here are the full instructions on running the Display driver uninstaller and CLEAN installing new drivers.

Graphics card CLEAN install tutorial using the DDU
All mentioned above is done 100%, the bios is the most recent (no updates), all my drivers for everything are most recent. I did a clean install of my graphics card as I went from Nvidia to AMD and thought it might screw my computer if I had Nvidia drivers and AMD drivers installed. I did find a tutorial for a clean install and followed it through. I will download a different spec reader or whatever and see if there is a difference as you said Speccy isn't trust worthy. Probably should have known cause it didn't read my motherboard right or know my RAM.
 

Daytona Beach

Prominent
Aug 3, 2017
19
1
525
1
I checked my temp on Ryzen Master and it said 16.17 degrees, I believe I looked at the right spot. So my cpu is running at 61f which isnt a problem. So I do think Speccy was reading wrong information.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Something still isn't right, because those temp readings aren't accurate either. Normal temperatures for practically all consumer processors should range somewhere between 25°C and 80°C IF there are no thermal issues and depending on what the ambient temperature of the room is where the computer is running. Unless you run a refrigerated cooler of some kind, you can never be below the ambient temperature of the room and even being AT the ambient temperature is practically impossible. Even at idle with the best closed loop liquid cooler you will still be somewhat above ambient because it's practically impossible to have a 100% efficient cooling solution.

Download both Core Temp and HWinfo, and post some screenshots with the system at idle approximately five minutes after a shut down and clean boot to the desktop. Don't start or run any applications other than the normal Windows processes and whatever normally runs in the background such as any Malware utilities or other normally running processes. Take screenshots of Ryzen master main screen, then close it and take them for Core Temp, then close that and take them for HWinfo (Choose the "Sensors only" option when you start HWinfo).

Its really starting to sound like perhaps you have a hardware issue of some kind, but it could also be a Windows issue. I'd go into the BIOS and see what the CPU temperature is reading while in the BIOS as well.
 

Daytona Beach

Prominent
Aug 3, 2017
19
1
525
1
Something still isn't right, because those temp readings aren't accurate either. Normal temperatures for practically all consumer processors should range somewhere between 25°C and 80°C IF there are no thermal issues and depending on what the ambient temperature of the room is where the computer is running. Unless you run a refrigerated cooler of some kind, you can never be below the ambient temperature of the room and even being AT the ambient temperature is practically impossible. Even at idle with the best closed loop liquid cooler you will still be somewhat above ambient because it's practically impossible to have a 100% efficient cooling solution.

Download both Core Temp and HWinfo, and post some screenshots with the system at idle approximately five minutes after a shut down and clean boot to the desktop. Don't start or run any applications other than the normal Windows processes and whatever normally runs in the background such as any Malware utilities or other normally running processes. Take screenshots of Ryzen master main screen, then close it and take them for Core Temp, then close that and take them for HWinfo (Choose the "Sensors only" option when you start HWinfo).

Its really starting to sound like perhaps you have a hardware issue of some kind, but it could also be a Windows issue. I'd go into the BIOS and see what the CPU temperature is reading while in the BIOS as well.
View: https://imgur.com/a/uMuT2mP


There is the screenshot, that's after a reboot with nothing starting up. It seems to be running better.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Most ppl use °C when referring to pc's and temps, when p start putting °F into the mix things can get confusing.

So, if the ambient temp is @ 22-23°C, then cpu temps at idle are perfect, normally they run @ 6-10°C higher than ambient.

Vcore 1.256 asked/delivered is ok, core voltage used 1.244 is also very good. Unless you have some erratic Vdroop, should be stable as a rock.

All in all, those numbers look very good.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Agreed, that looks fine. It's definitely NOT the same as 16.17°C though, being almost double that. At 16°C reading, something isn't right. At 25-35°C at idle, that is exactly what you should see for most systems. The next step would be to test the maximum thermal readings under a full load while running Prime95 version 26.6 (Small FFT torture test option) to see that you are not exceeding 80°C.
 

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