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CPU Speed Drops

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is right, and wrong. There IS a direct relationship between the CPU clock frequency and the % you have the processor state set to. It is NOT a setting of 50% power, or 100% power, it is a setting of CPU STATE. If you have a 4Ghz processor with a minimum 50% processor state setting, it will not EVER drop below 2000mhz even at idle. And the system WILL supply/adjust the voltage to be appropriate for the current processor STATE, so it actually has an affect in both regards, but only at idle or low demand.

If both are set to 100%, such as with the Performance power plan. It will not ever drop below it's maximum frequency setting and therefore WILL to some degree supply once again an appropriate amount of power to ensure the system does not become unstable. That will create an environment that continuously reflects conditions of higher heat and power consumption compared to a CPU that is dropping both frequency and core voltage to, say, 800mhz, while idling or in a low demand condition.

All of this of course is assuming default power and clock state settings such as Cool N Quiet, Intel speedstep or Intel speedshift. If those are disabled, I'm not sure the power profile settings will make a huge difference anyhow. I think it depends on whether the bios is configured for system or hardware power management.

On the other hand, I think it is a good thing that a reduction occurs when full frequency and voltage are not necessary, as it allows cores to have a "rest" period, in order to de-stress and cool. The speed at which a core goes from idle to full frequency happens so quickly you could never "feel" it anyhow and if the system is under load conditions, it should never drop down to lower frequencies AT ALL unless as you said, something else is wrong.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Check your CPU, graphics card and motherboard thermal sensor readings using HWinfo. Sounds like thermal throttling.

Are you overclocking?

Do you have sufficient cooling installed?

Have you installed, or re-installed, the CPU cooler recently?

Are all fans including the one on the CPU cooling even functioning?

What is the model number of your power supply?

Full system specs?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Even laptops can overheat. Actually, ESPECIALLY laptops can overheat, when gaming. Check your thermals while gaming at at idle, using HWinfo or CoreTemp.

Check both CPU and GPU card thermal readings. HWinfo might even specifically show fields indicating whether thermal throttling is occurring or not.
 
Which game are you playing? Does it happen with all games?


Is this a new or old problem. Some come in here months after an issue and others immediately.

Does this happen during your entire gaming session?

Does the drop in CPU speed translate to lag or freezes in the game?

Imagine you're in a car and you start in a small bustling city and you then get on the high/freeway. Will you be going as fast on city streets as you would on the highway? Your PC has been instructed to be efficient so it too will throttle when loads are lessened.

Is 60c for cpu and 58c gpu alright?
Perfect. I'd expect more heat from your GPU. After some Googling I see that's an integrated GPU(GPU is inside of CPU) so that temp. is what I would expect.

Where are you getting these values from? MSI AB?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator


Are those temps being read before or after you see the CPU speed drop?

If it is after, then you are probably too hot on the CPU.

If it is before throttling occurs, then it's probably not a heat issue, at least not with the CPU. Perhaps with something else on the motherboard though.

I'm guessing if it is not a heat issue, it is a driver problem. I'd check to see that you have the latest chipset drivers installed from your laptop's manufacturer product page. Also, it may be a good idea to check and see if there are any bios updates available for your laptop model. If there are, I'd probably update.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Pffft. Nope. Do not trust NZXT CAM monitoring settings. CAM is about as unreliable as anything out there. Just google NZXT CAM and find any of the hundreds of Reddit threads on it, or even visit the CAM forum and check out the miles of complaints. Half the time it doesn't run their own hardware properly and I'd be very skeptical about any readings in there despite the fact that it uses the CPU-Z backbone to obtain readings.

As I said, CoreTemp or HWinfo are primarily what you want to use for Intel sensors. CoreTemp with Distance to TJmax enabled or AMD Overdrive for AMD thermal margins.

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are not always terribly accurate, invariably, and in some cases. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. Always select the "Sensors only" option when running HWinfo.

In cases where it is relevant and you are seeking help, then in order to help you, it's often necessary to SEE what's going on, in the event one of us can pick something out that seems out of place, or other indicators that just can't be communicated via a text only post. In these cases, posting an image of the HWinfo sensors or something else can be extremely helpful. That may not be the case in YOUR thread, but if it is then the information at the following link will show you how to do that:

*How to post images in Tom's hardware forums



Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.

*Download HWinfo


For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:

*Download Core Temp
 

alexander0hamilton

Prominent
Aug 12, 2018
61
0
540
1
K I’ll download HWinfo and take screen shots on start up and during benchmarking. Hey, I’ve been looking at other posts and I disabled Intel Speedstep technology in the bios of my laptop and it resolved some of the issue but still drops from 3.4ghz to 2.2ghz and the base clock is 2.8ghz. Is this an issue?
 

alexander0hamilton

Prominent
Aug 12, 2018
61
0
540
1


 
Nope, another non-issue. Someone can go to Windows' power options and then to advanced power option. Within that list they can change the Processor Power Management values. There is a min and max processor state. Set both of those to 100% if you want your CPU at 100% load at all times.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Again, I don't recommend this. Especially on a laptop where we see heat on these units kill them every day because people try to treat them as though they are desktops with multiple fans and big coolers. They are not. They have minimal cooling, even on models "intended" for gaming.

But aquielisunari is right, in the advanced power options of control panel/settings you can select the performance profile OR you can go into the advanced settings of your power plan if it is on balanced or power saving, and simply change the minimum processor state setting to 100%, 75% etc. This SHOULD help keep the CPU frequency at it's maximum, so long as Intel speed step, Intel speed shift or AMD Cool N Quiet are not enabled. If they are, it may on some systems override that setting depending on other power management settings in the bios.

I personally would never do this on a laptop, but hey, it's your wallet.
 
In the interest of full transparency or just to be clear, the CPU's load percentage is not a reflection of "power". When the percentage drops there is not necessarily a drop in performance but instead a drop in unnecessary power is applied. Again I think of that stick shift car or truck. You and everybody else is in a convertible and y'all are traveling at 30mph/48kph. Everybody else's tachometer is hovering around 2200 RPM. But that guy over there has his accelerator/gas pedal pressed to the floorboard while he is in 3rd gear so his tachometer sits at 7500 RPM. He wants to be sure he is giving the car all the power it needs. It is not necessary nor is the extra power being applied helping anything. It's only creating more heat and wear and tear. The extra power your PC has when it's at 100% load is also being wasted if the user set it there. There are times where it'll go to 100% on it's own but only when it's necessary.
 

alexander0hamilton

Prominent
Aug 12, 2018
61
0
540
1


 


I don't see a reason to adjust it. If there is a significant FPS increase after you change the minimum power state to 100% then that would mean there is a problem elsewhere such as power settings. If the power options are at their default settings I would think it's set to power saver. I would instead set that to high performance(show more power options) or balanced if it's not already there.

A CPU load percentage reduction is normal but what I don't see is a problem caused by that change that needs a solution.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is right, and wrong. There IS a direct relationship between the CPU clock frequency and the % you have the processor state set to. It is NOT a setting of 50% power, or 100% power, it is a setting of CPU STATE. If you have a 4Ghz processor with a minimum 50% processor state setting, it will not EVER drop below 2000mhz even at idle. And the system WILL supply/adjust the voltage to be appropriate for the current processor STATE, so it actually has an affect in both regards, but only at idle or low demand.

If both are set to 100%, such as with the Performance power plan. It will not ever drop below it's maximum frequency setting and therefore WILL to some degree supply once again an appropriate amount of power to ensure the system does not become unstable. That will create an environment that continuously reflects conditions of higher heat and power consumption compared to a CPU that is dropping both frequency and core voltage to, say, 800mhz, while idling or in a low demand condition.

All of this of course is assuming default power and clock state settings such as Cool N Quiet, Intel speedstep or Intel speedshift. If those are disabled, I'm not sure the power profile settings will make a huge difference anyhow. I think it depends on whether the bios is configured for system or hardware power management.

On the other hand, I think it is a good thing that a reduction occurs when full frequency and voltage are not necessary, as it allows cores to have a "rest" period, in order to de-stress and cool. The speed at which a core goes from idle to full frequency happens so quickly you could never "feel" it anyhow and if the system is under load conditions, it should never drop down to lower frequencies AT ALL unless as you said, something else is wrong.
 

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