[SOLVED] CPU suddenly starts overheating after 7 years

Jul 18, 2021
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Basically, my PC is rather old (around 8 years) and has been running fine for about 7. Recently, my PSU fried and melted the outlet, so I replaced it. Since then, my CPU easily reaches 95 degrees and my PC dies probably due to the heat. I've tried everything from adding more ventilation in the case to undervolting the CPU, but nothing has helped.
I've done my testing using Prime95, undervolted using ThrottleStop and used HWinfo64 to monitor my CPU temps. basically, using the lightest test on Prime95, my CPU only holds on for about 30 seconds before reaching 95 degrees. (the fan doesn't seem to spin up any more than it already is runnning). I've also tried maxing my fan speed in the BIOS and disabling smart fan control, and setting it to max.
Idk why my CPU only has this issue now, the PC has been running for years just fine, and now the CPU overheats when running basic games like TF2, apex or CS:GO.
Here are the temperature logs btw:
View: https://imgur.com/a/Cllf9b0

(I have no idea why the CPU isn't thermal throttling)

if anyone has any other suggestions on what to try I'd love to hear them.
(btw I don't have any spare parts to work with so...)

Specs:
I7-4770
16gb DDR3 @ 1600mhz
GTX 970
1TB seagate barracuda @ 7200rpm
 
The scenario you have painted tells me your PSU has caused serious damage. To save a whole heap of frustration then breadboard the system starting in minimalist state. If you feel you don't want to do that then update your system after all you had a good run after 8 years.
 
Reactions: Krotow
Basically, my PC is rather old (around 8 years) and has been running fine for about 7. Recently, my PSU fried and melted the outlet, so I replaced it. Since then, my CPU easily reaches 95 degrees and my PC dies probably due to the heat. I've tried everything from adding more ventilation in the case to undervolting the CPU, but nothing has helped.
I've done my testing using Prime95, undervolted using ThrottleStop and used HWinfo64 to monitor my CPU temps. basically, using the lightest test on Prime95, my CPU only holds on for about 30 seconds before reaching 95 degrees. (the fan doesn't seem to spin up any more than it already is runnning). I've also tried maxing my fan speed in the BIOS and disabling smart fan control, and setting it to max.
Idk why my CPU only has this issue now, the PC has been running for years just fine, and now the CPU overheats when running basic games like TF2, apex or CS:GO.
Here are the temperature logs btw:
View: https://imgur.com/a/Cllf9b0

(I have no idea why the CPU isn't thermal throttling)

if anyone has any other suggestions on what to try I'd love to hear them.
(btw I don't have any spare parts to work with so...)

Specs:
I7-4770
16gb DDR3 @ 1600mhz
GTX 970
1TB seagate barracuda @ 7200rpm
Time to replace TIM paste under CPU cooler.
 

GuardianFromSteam

Honorable
Aug 11, 2015
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  1. What type of cooler do you have?
  2. have you removed the protective film on cold plate (if there was one)
  3. have you applied the thermal paste when remounting the cooler ?
  4. what are the CPU voltage and frequency ?
Please post pictures of inside the case
 
"Suddenly" "after the PSU blew up" "after 7 years"
...
What about this is sudden?
Did you look into the general settings in bios after this issue? Maybe it defaulted back to some sort of overclock, you should make sure that speed step and so on are still enabled.
 
Jul 18, 2021
9
0
10
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  1. What type of cooler do you have?
  2. have you removed the protective film on cold plate (if there was one)
  3. have you applied the thermal paste when remounting the cooler ?
  4. what are the CPU voltage and frequency ?
Please post pictures of inside the case
  1. stock cooler
  2. yes? its been 8 years
  3. yes, professionals have re-applied thermal paste for me
  4. 3.4ghz max (I disabled turbo during the undervolting process, and I've managed a -40mV offset. Not sure what the normal voltage is, probably around 1.3-1.4V
"Suddenly" "after the PSU blew up" "after 7 years"
...
What about this is sudden?
Did you look into the general settings in bios after this issue? Maybe it defaulted back to some sort of overclock, you should make sure that speed step and so on are still enabled.
nope, nothing in the BIOS got changed. I've also tried resetting CMOS but nothing helped.
basically the story is that one day my PC stopped working, and when I unplugged it, the Power socket was melted and black. I immediately pulled out the PSU and replaced it, and I presume it was fried. Never risked testing it though.
 
Basically, my PC is rather old (around 8 years) and has been running fine for about 7. Recently, my PSU fried and melted the outlet, so I replaced it. Since then, my CPU easily reaches 95 degrees and my PC dies probably due to the heat. I've tried everything from adding more ventilation in the case to undervolting the CPU, but nothing has helped.
I've done my testing using Prime95, undervolted using ThrottleStop and used HWinfo64 to monitor my CPU temps. basically, using the lightest test on Prime95, my CPU only holds on for about 30 seconds before reaching 95 degrees. (the fan doesn't seem to spin up any more than it already is runnning). I've also tried maxing my fan speed in the BIOS and disabling smart fan control, and setting it to max.
Idk why my CPU only has this issue now, the PC has been running for years just fine, and now the CPU overheats when running basic games like TF2, apex or CS:GO.
Here are the temperature logs btw:
View: https://imgur.com/a/Cllf9b0

(I have no idea why the CPU isn't thermal throttling)

if anyone has any other suggestions on what to try I'd love to hear them.
(btw I don't have any spare parts to work with so...)

Specs:
I7-4770
16gb DDR3 @ 1600mhz
GTX 970
1TB seagate barracuda @ 7200rpm
TJMAX is 100C before throttling, so I would try to run it below 80C for longevity.
When was the last time you cleaned the inside of your PC?
Pockets of dust can build up especially in the fins of your cooler and suddenly you have an overheating situation. Dismount your HSF and blow out the crap that would have built up over 8 years of use.

Also you mentioned the PSU fried and a failed unit can also bring down hardware components if connected to the MB.

Do not use prime95 for testing without knowing what you are doing.
Some algorithms are too harsh when stress testing and should not be left unmonitored. When workers stop it does not tell you the cause. Use a less aggressive stress tester like AIDA64 for a more comprehensive and safe test.
 
Jul 18, 2021
9
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10
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TJMAX is 100C before throttling, so I would try to run it below 80C for longevity.
When was the last time you cleaned the inside of your PC?
Pockets of dust can build up especially in the fins of your cooler and suddenly you have an overheating situation. Dismount your HSF and blow out the crap that would have built up over 8 years of use.

Also you mentioned the PSU fried and a failed unit can also bring down hardware components if connected to the MB.

Do not use prime95 for testing without knowing what you are doing.
Some algorithms are too harsh when stress testing and should not be left unmonitored. When workers stop it does not tell you the cause. Use a less aggressive stress tester like AIDA64 for a more comprehensive and safe test.
I ran prime95 on the "smallest FTT test", and monitored my CPU temps throughout the test. after around 30 seconds when the temperature reached 90 degrees, I'd shut off the test and my CPU temp would drop down to 60 degrees over the next 5 seconds. I never willingly let my PC run that hot, and I never let my PC do a stresstest without me monitoring it.

yes, the PC has been cleaned, and there is no dust buildup.

and yeah, I am suspecting that my motherboard got dragged down by the fried PSU, and is not able to control the voltage sent to the CPU, although it's kinda weird why every tool I have says the voltage is in a good limit
 
Jul 18, 2021
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A failing PSU as I said can effect any hardware component. so all will have to be tested.
Best thing now is to Breadboard the system outside your case.
honestly, if there is nothing else I can do, I might as well cut my losses and get a new pc. I already have signs that my HDD is dying (disk scan running on every boot, slow loading times, apps suddenly freezing for no reason and other stuff) and I'm having some issues with my RAM too. already spent over 150 bucks on repairs, and honestly, for these specs and this PC age, I'm not sure if it's worth fixing at this point.
 
The scenario you have painted tells me your PSU has caused serious damage. To save a whole heap of frustration then breadboard the system starting in minimalist state. If you feel you don't want to do that then update your system after all you had a good run after 8 years.
 
Reactions: Krotow
Jul 18, 2021
9
0
10
0
The scenario you have painted tells me your PSU has caused serious damage. To save a whole heap of frustration then breadboard the system starting in minimalist state. If you feel you don't want to do that then update your system after all you had a good run after 8 years.
The thing is, my PC is essentially running in a minimalist state save the GPU and a stick of ram. Already tried it, and the system is just as unstable as it is when it's running normally. Guess I'll be replacing the PC, F. had a good run.
Thanks for the help mates!
 

GuardianFromSteam

Honorable
Aug 11, 2015
62
1
10,535
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Some things you can try,
Click on Control Panel, Power Options, then to the right of the selected plan, click on Change plan setting. Next, click on Change advanced power settings, then drag the scroll bar down. Click on + next to Processor power management, then click on + next to Maximum processor state. This Setting can be changed, similar to Minimum power state as shown below. Set it to 75% and click Apply. If possible

You can also try getting another cpu cooler, maybe like a hyper 212 evo if you want to take all steps before replacing the whole pc. Good thing is that you can most likely keep all the data and transfer it to the new computer
 
Jul 18, 2021
9
0
10
0
Some things you can try,
Click on Control Panel, Power Options, then to the right of the selected plan, click on Change plan setting. Next, click on Change advanced power settings, then drag the scroll bar down. Click on + next to Processor power management, then click on + next to Maximum processor state. This Setting can be changed, similar to Minimum power state as shown below. Set it to 75% and click Apply. If possible

You can also try getting another cpu cooler, maybe like a hyper 212 evo if you want to take all steps before replacing the whole pc. Good thing is that you can most likely keep all the data and transfer it to the new computer
already tried the control panel method. no change.
getting another cooler is out of the question for me, as i've already invested quite a bit in trying to fix the PC and honestly, any more then I might as well throw thgis one out and get a new desktop instead of investing a lot more and have it running for possibly another year.
 
  1. stock cooler
  2. yes, professionals have re-applied thermal paste for me
You're using Intel stock cooler on i7 and surprised, why it is overheating?
Stock cooler is fine for low power i3 and pentium cpus. On i5 it gets rather loud. On i7 - cpu eventually overheats.
This is to be expected.

Also Intel stock cooler after removal (if you changed thermal paste) has to be reinstalled properly. Push pins have to be in certain orientation.
If this is not done, then cooler makes bad contact with cpu and cpu overheats.

Show us a photo, how cpu cooler looks in your system. We'll tell you, if it's installed properly.

BTW - what PSU was before (that died) and what PSU are you using now?

 
Jul 18, 2021
9
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You're using Intel stock cooler on i7 and surprised, why it is overheating?
Stock cooler is fine for low power i3 and pentium cpus. On i5 it gets rather loud. On i7 - cpu eventually overheats.
This is to be expected.

Also Intel stock cooler after removal (if you changed thermal paste) has to be reinstalled properly. Push pins have to be in certain orientation.
If this is not done, then cooler makes bad contact with cpu and cpu overheats.

Show us a photo, how cpu cooler looks in your system. We'll tell you, if it's installed properly.

BTW - what PSU was before (that died) and what PSU are you using now?

the thing is that I've been using my PC for 7 years and never once did it overheat using the stock cooler. I know it's considered insufficient, but it doesn't explain why it's never overheated, and suddenly even medium-light tasks cause the PC to overheat.

I've already tried re-installing the cooler, and thermal paste has been re-applied as well.

PSU I used before was an EVGA 450W BT, now I have a CoolerMaster MWE 450W.
 

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