[SOLVED] CPU temp softwares reporting completely different temperatures, who do i believe???

Fect123

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Feb 17, 2021
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Reference image: View: https://i.imgur.com/hfaFXM6.jpeg


installed a new CPU cooler last week. normally, i'd just use SpeedFan to monitor my cpu temperatures. however, my ASUS software shows two slightly different temperatures. i'm aware of what the 'CPU Package' is, but not sure if i should worry about it. is it basically like GPU hot spot temperatures?

main question though is, why are all 3 of these reporting completely different temperatures?? i feel like my thermal paste might need replacing or something. using an i7-10700 btw
 

DimkaTsv

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Nov 7, 2021
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which one is the temperature that i should/shouldnt pay attention to? sorry for noob questions
Ok, now it just clear that Intel gives you unnecessary info as sensor data.
You have value Tj max that means Throttling temp limit. For Intel it equals max recommended temperature - 100 degrees for most CPU (Ryzen have 95 for example, but this value isn't openly shown)
Or in other way all these 65+ degrees on "Core X distance to Tj max" is one big scum
These values meaning is Δt between your current temp in specific place and Tj max (throttling limit). Or in simple words - how much degrees lie in between current temp and throttling limit. Basically useless values.
Also 55 degrees cores is nothing scary at all
 

DimkaTsv

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Nov 7, 2021
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Try HWInfo, you can see all temp sensors available, as comparing values from 2 different monitoring apps is not very representative.
It also could be that Intel have kinda trash-y temperature sensor in cores (off away from actual hotspots), and better placement for package temp sensor...
Because for Ryzen at least I/O doesn't heat up at all compared to cores. So i doubt it have big factor in package temp there
 
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Fect123

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Feb 17, 2021
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545
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Try HWInfo, you can see all temp sensors available, as comparing values from 2 different monitoring apps is not very representative.
It also could be that Intel have kinda trash-y temperature sensor in cores (off away from actual hotspots), and better placement for package temp sensor...
Because for Ryzen at least I/O doesn't heat up at all compared to cores. So i doubt it have big factor in package temp there
View: https://i.imgur.com/DeChbg0.png
which one is the temperature that i should/shouldnt pay attention to? sorry for noob questions
 

JinxTheWorld

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Jan 10, 2021
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As far as i can see, temps are fine. CPU's today can hit up to 80c without much or any throttling. Ryzen for example are made to handle up to 95c (though don't let it get that high lol).

As far as the temps go just go with the one that reads the closest to what the BIOS says in idle. The overall core temp. The individual cores are gonna jump around and do an occasional high temp spike from what i have seen. For me i use OpenHardwareMonitor. It read the temps in my PC quite well and it is highly customizable for what temps are shown.


Been using it for awhile and haven't had any issues.

Here's how mine looks:
View: https://i.imgur.com/mZprrq1.jpg
 

DimkaTsv

Proper
Nov 7, 2021
156
23
115
15
which one is the temperature that i should/shouldnt pay attention to? sorry for noob questions
Ok, now it just clear that Intel gives you unnecessary info as sensor data.
You have value Tj max that means Throttling temp limit. For Intel it equals max recommended temperature - 100 degrees for most CPU (Ryzen have 95 for example, but this value isn't openly shown)
Or in other way all these 65+ degrees on "Core X distance to Tj max" is one big scum
These values meaning is Δt between your current temp in specific place and Tj max (throttling limit). Or in simple words - how much degrees lie in between current temp and throttling limit. Basically useless values.
Also 55 degrees cores is nothing scary at all
 

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