Question CPU temperature suddenly increased to 60-70 degrees after installing case fan ?

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
First, get rid of HWmonitor. Download either core temp or HWinfo.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". IF you get a message about system stability you can simply ignore it and continue on WITH the option to monitor the sensor OR you can disable the monitoring for THAT sensor and continue on based on the option it gives you at the time. If you choose to continue on, WITH monitoring of that sensor, which is what I normally do, and there IS instability, that's fine. It's not going to hurt anything. Simply restart the HWinfo program (Or reboot if necessary and THEN restart the HWinfo program) and THEN choose to disable that sensor, and continue on with sensors only monitoring.

The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 (With AVX and AVX2 disabled) or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo




For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp








Also, posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:

How to post images on Tom's hardware forums
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, the bottom line is, 76°C with the stock cooler isn't bad. It's within tolerance. It's possible that the new fan is "stealing" a little bit of the cool airflow. It would help to know the FULL hardware configuration including ALL installed fans, EXACTLY what directly each fan is blowing (in or out) for each fan location. Case model and the rest of the hardware would, well, be helpful too.
 

WrongRookie

Prominent
Oct 23, 2020
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@Darkbreeze Ok so this is the case that I have

Corsair Carbide Series CC-9011050-WW Mid-Tower Steel Gaming Case with Red LED (Black)

https://www.amazon.in/Corsair-Carbide-Spec-01-RGB-Gaming/dp/B00I6BJATW/ref=sr_1_2?crid=2184R7Z3NI4PO&keywords=corsair+case&qid=1647577052&sprefix=corsair+case,aps,231&sr=8-2&th=1

There is only one fan installed at the front and it has red led. Now the fan that I just installed is at the back as you've seen from the image so that makes it only two fans the case has if you exclude the cooler fan

This is the specs of the PC

OS: Windows 10 pro 64-bit

CPU: Intel Core i7 7700@ 3.60GHz
Kaby Lake 14nm Technology

Ram 16.0 GB Dual-Channel @ 1063MHz
CT8G4DFS8213.M8FB

Motherboard: Supermicro C7H270-CG-ML

Graphics

ViewSonic XG2401(1920X1080@144Hz)
4095MB NVIDIA Geforce GTX 1050 Ti(ZOTAC INTERNATIONAL)

Storage

1863GB SEAGATE ST2000Dm006-2DM164(SATA)
1863GB TOSHIBA External USB 3.0 USB Device(USB(SATA))

Optical Drives

Asus DRW-24D5MT

AUDIO
Realtek High Definition Audio

So with this in mind, what do I have to do now? Install one more fan? If so which one? The front one with 140mm? Or another 120mm and that should be placed on top?

I would also like to ask that without this new fan, the temp was at 40-50 degrees. Now even with this new fan, the temp is the same but slightly increased. I thought that having more fans helps to cool the CPU and the PC in general...does it really?

The reason I ask is that I do video editing and sometimes when I export videos, I notice the front fan atleast makes a mild noise and I understand that CPU has to stress on that but it does leave me concerned. Do I need to change the RPM of the new system fan?

EDIT: The case has one 120mm fan inside it from the looks of it. So can anyone tell me now if its worth getting two 140mm fans in the front? If so, which fans would be ideal for that? AF, SP or ML?
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so you're getting up to around 94°C peak and that is way too hot under any conditions. The absolute maximum you want to see, even running a very torturous stress test like Prime95 is no more than 85°C and really you want to see temps remain below 80°C so there's definitely something going on.

I would recommend that you check very closely to see if one of the push pins that holds the CPU cooler down has popped loose or something and if not I'd agree with the idea that perhaps removing the heatsink, cleaning off any existing thermal interface material using isopropyl alcohol and applying fresh paste would be a good idea. If you don't have paste you will need to get some. Arctic MX-4 is fairly inexpensive and pretty readily available both online and at most PC hardware retailers, but there are plenty of others that are good too like Noctua NT-H1 or H2, Thermal grizzly Kryonaut, etc.

There are also tons and tons of guides on doing this so I won't waste time or space by posting another version of it here, but if the CPU cooler fan is operating the way it should then the only thing it can really be is one of those two things.

Getting a better cooler might not be the worst idea ever either.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
No. It doesn't matter what you are doing, including running a stress test like Prime95 or intense video editing, if the CPU is ever achieving those kinds of temperatures then something is wrong. It should never get that hot.

Can you continue to run it like that as long as you don't run any intensive tasks? Maybe, but you can just as well say that you can drive your car around permanently on a temporary tire too. Doesn't make it a good idea and it's something that could eventually have a disastrous result. I would not recommend it. It shouldn't be all that hard to take care of the problem so there is little reason not to do so.
 

WrongRookie

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No. It doesn't matter what you are doing, including running a stress test like Prime95 or intense video editing, if the CPU is ever achieving those kinds of temperatures then something is wrong. It should never get that hot.

Can you continue to run it like that as long as you don't run any intensive tasks? Maybe, but you can just as well say that you can drive your car around permanently on a temporary tire too. Doesn't make it a good idea and it's something that could eventually have a disastrous result. I would not recommend it. It shouldn't be all that hard to take care of the problem so there is little reason not to do so.
With all due respect sir I looked up the cpu and apparently it can handle upto 100 degrees


I however appreciate your help sir. It's just that next year or so I'm planning to upgrade my pc anyways so I feel spending a lot on a cooler now or making an effort on the thermal now seems pointless to me.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
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With all due respect sir I looked up the cpu and apparently it can handle upto 100 degrees
Sure, it can "handle" it. But at temperatures above 90°C Intel CPUs begin getting into the area where electromigration and VT-shift start to occur. What that means is that while your CPU isn't going to instantly die or melt or anything catastrophic like that, it IS going to start to degrade. But hey, it's your CPU. You came here for advice and I offered you advice. If you don't want to listen to that advice that is certainly up to you.

Perhaps you'd be more inclined to listen to the advice coming directly from the author of the Intel temperature guide, whose research and insights are extensive and unimpeachable.


Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.
• Tj Max specifications also vary with TDP specifications. Certain low TDP variants may Throttle below 90°C, while for others, the highest Tj Max value is 105°C. However, some 9th through 11th Generation motherboards violate TJ Max with an "Offset" adjustment in BIOS to increase Intel's thermal limit from 100°C (212°F), where most processors Throttle, to 115°C which can damage your CPU. Nevertheless, you should not run your processor near its thermal limit, just as common sense tells you not to drive a vehicle with the temperature gauge on red.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Right, that's what I figured was the reason you answered that way, but the problem with that is that members like this will take what you've said at face value and assume you were being 100% serious rather than what you were actually being which was sarcastic. I'm always tempted to do just as you did, but I ignore the impulse because I know how people are and that they will assume that I'm actually saying it's fine because that is what they want to hear. In which case, I am then being irresponsible, because I know better and have in plenty of cases managed to eventually get them to understand the reality of the situation. Not always, but often enough to make it worth the effort.
 

WrongRookie

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Right, that's what I figured was the reason you answered that way, but the problem with that is that members like this will take what you've said at face value and assume you were being 100% serious rather than what you were actually being which was sarcastic. I'm always tempted to do just as you did, but I ignore the impulse because I know how people are and that they will assume that I'm actually saying it's fine because that is what they want to hear. In which case, I am then being irresponsible, because I know better and have in plenty of cases managed to eventually get them to understand the reality of the situation. Not always, but often enough to make it worth the effort.
Sir again with due respect, I understand the importance of not overheating the CPU but didn't Intel and AMD make it that should it ever overheat to that level continuously, it should shut down the system anyways?

Its not that I don't want to do it but considering that I'm eventually going to upgrade my PC with a better CPU and Graphics card, maintaining this one is wasting money especially if I can't find a cooler that is compatible with this and the newer CPU from my hometown.

It won't die off instantly and that's what matters right now but at some point, It will die like all electronics and by the time that happens, I would have already upgraded my PC with a new CPU and cooler.

Anyways I have ordered another set of fans for the front as the case supports two 140mm fans. May not be the ultimate solution but if it doesn't work out or worsens the temps...well by that point, again the upgrade is inevitable.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You still don't seem to understand so I'm going to offer one last attempt to make it clear for you.

It's not a question of you causing immediate failure of the CPU by running it at those temps. What it IS, is a fact that you are seriously shortening the lifespan of your CPU by doing it. Yes, Intel and AMD have protection mechanisms in place that are supposed to ensure that users don't instantly cook their hardware when there is a cooling issue, however, degradation begins to occur long before you reach those temperatures if you are hitting those temps with any regularity at all.

And honestly, if you simply wanted to disagree about whether specific temperatures are ok or not, I'm not even sure why you'd make a post asking about it. Either way, hopefully you understand better now and if not I'd highly recommend that you read the Intel temperature guide which I linked you to earlier as it explains everything in detail.

As I said previously, it's very unlikely that your case fans have anything to do with your problem. You either need to remount the CPU cooler or get a better one. In fact, if you take the side panel off and still have similar temperature issues you can be sure that your case fans have literally ZERO to do with the problem because you will have eliminated them from the equation as the CPU cooler would then have direct access to the outside, cooler, ambient air. If your CPU exceeds thermal recommendations with no side panel on, then it is ALWAYS a problem related to the CPU cooling, voltage or frequency, or a motherboard incapable of supporting that CPU, and nothing at all to do with case fans. Sure, having good case airflow is important, but I'd just about guarantee that you already have enough or more than enough that it is not the root of your problem.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
No need for LGA 1700 bracket.
i7 7700 is LGA 1151.
OP was concerned about future support, for the cooler.

Its not that I don't want to do it but considering that I'm eventually going to upgrade my PC with a better CPU and Graphics card, maintaining this one is wasting money especially if I can't find a cooler that is compatible with this and the newer CPU from my hometown.
 

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