Question CPU Trouble

Oct 19, 2019
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My mobo displays red led for the cpu error message before going off almost instantly. A few seconds later the ram will light up( the ram is the only thing that starts up). I have a ryzen 7 2700 x on a gigabyte aorus ultra gaming X470. Sorry for choppiness on mobile.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did you just build this system? Has it ever been able to POST and boot, and the problem just started out of the blue, or has it never been able to POST since you assembled it?

Have you pulled the CPU out to check for misalignment or bent pins?

Checked to see that the memory is installed in the second and fourth slots, if you are using two DIMMs?

Made sure the memory is fully seated, that the offset notch is lined up near the middle of the DIMM slot and that the lock tabs are engaged after seating the memory, at both ends?

CPU cooler is installed and connected to the CPU_FAN header?

Did you remember to connect the 4+4 pin EPS 12v CPU power connector to the motherboard?

What is the exact model of your power supply?
 
Oct 19, 2019
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This is a rebuild of the same system. I checked the 8 pin cpu connected, and looked for any bent there were none. The 2 sticks of ram I have are seated properly. The pc has not been able to boot after the rebuild. I checked my cpu cooler it is fine aswell. My PSU is a EVGA 750w power supply.
 
Oct 19, 2019
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I did’nt change anything. I have a open air case ( the thermal take core P3) so I was doing a routine cleaning like I do every three or so months. Please note I never took the cpu out of the socket.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so that IS a rather important point, so I'm glad you specified that. It helps to eliminate a pretty common short list of issues.

What is the exact model of your 750w EVGA power supply, or at least, what series is it from, and how long has it been in service?

Have you tried a hard reset of the BIOS, because sometimes for whatever reason that seems to be a magic bullet in a lot of cases where the system was working fine, power was removed and then restored and the system unexpectedly fails to POST.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Also, I would double and triple check EVERYTHING listed at the following link, JUST to be sure. Overlook nothing. Even if you don't THINK it might be relevant or think it is good. Unplug and reconnect every connection JUST TO BE SURE. Especially the memory and graphics card, but also the motherboard connections, CPU fan (Make sure you didn't miss the alignment of that connection by one pin, or some other fan connection by a pin to the left or right.)

 
Oct 19, 2019
9
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Ok, I reset the bios ,but
Ok, so that IS a rather important point, so I'm glad you specified that. It helps to eliminate a pretty common short list of issues.

What is the exact model of your 750w EVGA power supply, or at least, what series is it from, and how long has it been in service?

Have you tried a hard reset of the BIOS, because sometimes for whatever reason that seems to be a magic bullet in a lot of cases where the system was working fine, power was removed and then restored and the system unexpectedly fails to POST.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Also, I would double and triple check EVERYTHING listed at the following link, JUST to be sure. Overlook nothing. Even if you don't THINK it might be relevant or think it is good. Unplug and reconnect every connection JUST TO BE SURE. Especially the memory and graphics card, but also the motherboard connections, CPU fan (Make sure you didn't miss the alignment of that connection by one pin, or some other fan connection by a pin to the left or right.)

nothing changed. also when looking for my exact psu model I realized it is a 600w rather then a 750 like a claimed it to be. Here is the link to the model on Best Buy, https://www.bestbuy.com/site/evga-600w-atx-12v-eps-12v-80-plus-power-supply-black/8511029.p?skuId=8511029. I bought this psu almost a year ago. Thanks, for all you help so far.
 
Oct 19, 2019
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ok good to know. I bought this psu from BestBuy as I needed 1 and didn’t want to wait for shipping as the rest of my build was finished. Guess this is what my impatience gets me. My gpu is the EVGA gtx 1080 FTW ACX 3.0 8gb. I will be testing my PSU soon after I post this. I’ll update you in the status of that.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, I probably shouldn't say "terrible quality", but it is certainly NOT a model that should be used with any halfway capable gaming hardware. They just can't keep up and they don't last very long under demanding conditions. When looking at PSU replacement models, for EVGA you want to stick to the B2, G2, G3, GQ, P2 or T2 models.

Specifically, these are my recommendations when it comes to choosing a power supply:

 
Oct 19, 2019
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Well so far it seems the power supply may be the issue. It’s not conclusive, however my voltage finder did not find any voltage coming out from the psu cables. However it did find voltage going into the psu. I’m pulling it out from my system now to do some better more conclusive tests.
 
Oct 19, 2019
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unfortunately the psu seems to be working . When I connected the green and black cable on the 24 pin connector, the fan on the psu started running. This leads me to believe I may have a mobo issue. Which sucks as the psu would have been a much cheaper fix. Anymore tests I should do on psu. And what new tests should I do on mobo?
 
Oct 19, 2019
9
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unfortunately the psu seems to be working . When I connected the green and black cable on the 24 pin connector, the fan on the psu started running. This leads me to believe I may have a mobo issue. Which sucks as the psu would have been a much cheaper fix. Anymore tests I should do on psu. And what new tests should I do on mobo?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Just because the PSU fan turns on, does not mean that the PSU is capable of delivering the required power on any of the rails. If you have no power coming out of the PSU with it powered on, as seen at the following video, then it is no good. If you do, then it STILL might not be any good, under a load, but should certainly at least TRY to turn on.

This is EXACTLY how to test, using a volt meter:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw
 
Oct 19, 2019
9
0
10
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Just because the PSU fan turns on, does not mean that the PSU is capable of delivering the required power on any of the rails. If you have no power coming out of the PSU with it powered on, as seen at the following video, then it is no good. If you do, then it STILL might not be any good, under a load, but should certainly at least TRY to turn on.

This is EXACTLY how to test, using a volt meter:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw
Hey, sorry for the radio silence I’ve been busy recently. I tested the PSU and it is working. However, when I took a closer look at my mobo, I saw that it had slight corrosion around the cpu 8 pin power port (this is on the back of the mobo. I am thinking this is my problem. I don’t now how they got corroded but they are. Is this the issue? If. So is it possible to replace the connector or do I need to get a new mobo. Fortunately it is under warranty and I have a receipt from the micro center I purchased it from. Any tips? Thanks.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Can you post a picture of it? You are probably right, if there is visual evidence that looks abnormal. We don't USUALLY see this around sockets, normally it's around capacitors and such, but it's possible anywhere especially if there are high humidity conditions or moisture.
 

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