Question cpu voltage question

packersfan036

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im using a ryzen 7 1700x overclocked to 3.90 voltage on auto which is reading at 1.444 volts is this ok voltage? everything seems ok. motherboard im using is a asus prime b450m, also just ran cinebench cpu temps got up to 70c max and my score was1671. cooling cpu with a corsair h100i v2 liquid cooler.
 
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Darkbreeze

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You don't test thermals using Cinebench. That won't get the CPU anywhere near TDP.

You need to set voltage manually, and then test, in steps, to find the lowest voltage that the system is stable at, in order to achieve the best overclock with the lowest thermal result.

Quick and dirty overview of overclocking/stability validation procedure.

Set CPU multiplier and voltage at desired settings in BIOS. Do not use presets or automatic utilities. These will overcompensate on core and other voltages. It is much better to configure most core settings manually, and leave anything left over on auto until a later point in time if wish to come back and tweak settings such as cache (Uncore) frequency, System agent voltage, VCCIO (Internal memory controller) and memory speeds or timings (RAM) AFTER the CPU overclock is fully stable.

Save bios settings (As a new BIOS profile if your bios supports multiple profiles) and exit bios.

Boot into the Windows desktop environment. Download and install Prime95 version 26.6.

Download and install either HWinfo or CoreTemp.

Open HWinfo and run "Sensors only" or open CoreTemp.

Run Prime95 (ONLY version 26.6) and choose the "Small FFT test option". Run this for 15 minutes while monitoring your core/package temperatures to verify that you do not exceed the thermal specifications of your CPU.

(This should be considered to be 80°C for most generations of Intel processor and for current Ryzen CPUs. For older AMD FX and Phenom series, you should use a thermal monitor that has options for "Distance to TJmax" and you want to NOT see distance to TJmax drop below 10°C distance to TJmax. Anything that is MORE than 10°C distance to TJmax is within the allowed thermal envelope.)

If your CPU passes the thermal compliance test, move on to stability.

Download and install Realbench. Run Realbench and choose the Stress test option. Choose a value from the available memory (RAM) options that is equal to approximately half of your installed memory capacity. If you have 16GB, choose 8GB. If you have 8GB, choose 4GB, etc. Click start and allow the stability test to run for 8 hours. Do not plan to use the system for ANYTHING else while it is running. It will run realistic AVX and handbrake workloads and if it passes 8 hours of testing it is probably about as stable as you can reasonably expect.

If you wish to check stability further you can run 12-24 hours of Prime95 Blend mode or Small FFT.

You do not need to simultaneously run HWinfo or CoreTemp while running Realbench as you should have already performed the thermal compliance test PLUS Realbench will show current CPU temperatures while it is running.

If you run the additional stability test using Prime95 Blend/Small FFT modes for 12-24 hours, you will WANT to also run HWinfo alongside it. Monitor HWinfo periodically to verify that no cores/threads are showing less than 100% usage. If it is, then that worker has errored out and the test should be stopped.

If you find there are errors on ANY of the stability tests including Realbench or Prime95, or any other stress testing utility, you need to make a change in the bios. This could be either dropping the multiplier to a lower factor or increasing the voltage while leaving the multiplier the same. If you change voltage or multiplier at ANY time, you need to start over again at the beginning and verify thermal compliance again.

A more in depth but general guide that is still intended for beginners or those who have had a small amount of experience overclocking can be found here:


*CPU overclocking guide for beginners
 
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im using a ryzen 7 1700x overclocked to 3.90 voltage on auto which is reading at 1.444 volts is this ok voltage? everything seems ok. motherboard im using is a asus prime b450m, also just ran cinebench cpu temps got up to 70c max and my score was1671
Not good to have Core voltage on Auto and should be manually set around 1.375V (slight variations from chip to chip) for a 4.0GHz OC (Max core voltage is 1.4V for longevity).
Try SOC at 1.2V and mid range LLC for stability.
 
Depending on your Motherboard (which I'd say it's the biggest variance you'll be subjected to), you can leave your voltage to auto at the expense of running hotter and less efficiently.

I just went with that choice myself and it works fine keeping a couple things in mind: you have to cap the multiplier to something reasonable and you have to cap the voltage to 1.44v (this is my yellow line; my red is 1.48v and 1.5v is experimenting).

Some Motherboards will allow you this level of granularity and others will just, maybe, let you set the multiplier only.

Then you have to just play with the fixed voltage route and sacrifice a lot of power saving over a constant OC.

Cheers!
 

packersfan036

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May 27, 2015
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Depending on your Motherboard (which I'd say it's the biggest variance you'll be subjected to), you can leave your voltage to auto at the expense of running hotter and less efficiently.

I just went with that choice myself and it works fine keeping a couple things in mind: you have to cap the multiplier to something reasonable and you have to cap the voltage to 1.44v (this is my yellow line; my red is 1.48v and 1.5v is experimenting).

Some Motherboards will allow you this level of granularity and others will just, maybe, let you set the multiplier only.

Then you have to just play with the fixed voltage route and sacrifice a lot of power saving over a constant OC.

Cheers!
my motherboard has a very confusing way to adjust core voltage which is vddcr cpu voltage, and vddcr soc voltage. its the asus prime b450m so I set the voltage to auto.
 

packersfan036

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May 27, 2015
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You don't test thermals using Cinebench. That won't get the CPU anywhere near TDP.

You need to set voltage manually, and then test, in steps, to find the lowest voltage that the system is stable at, in order to achieve the best overclock with the lowest thermal result.

Quick and dirty overview of overclocking/stability validation procedure.

Set CPU multiplier and voltage at desired settings in BIOS. Do not use presets or automatic utilities. These will overcompensate on core and other voltages. It is much better to configure most core settings manually, and leave anything left over on auto until a later point in time if wish to come back and tweak settings such as cache (Uncore) frequency, System agent voltage, VCCIO (Internal memory controller) and memory speeds or timings (RAM) AFTER the CPU overclock is fully stable.

Save bios settings (As a new BIOS profile if your bios supports multiple profiles) and exit bios.

Boot into the Windows desktop environment. Download and install Prime95 version 26.6.

Download and install either HWinfo or CoreTemp.

Open HWinfo and run "Sensors only" or open CoreTemp.

Run Prime95 (ONLY version 26.6) and choose the "Small FFT test option". Run this for 15 minutes while monitoring your core/package temperatures to verify that you do not exceed the thermal specifications of your CPU.

(This should be considered to be 80°C for most generations of Intel processor and for current Ryzen CPUs. For older AMD FX and Phenom series, you should use a thermal monitor that has options for "Distance to TJmax" and you want to NOT see distance to TJmax drop below 10°C distance to TJmax. Anything that is MORE than 10°C distance to TJmax is within the allowed thermal envelope.)

If your CPU passes the thermal compliance test, move on to stability.

Download and install Realbench. Run Realbench and choose the Stress test option. Choose a value from the available memory (RAM) options that is equal to approximately half of your installed memory capacity. If you have 16GB, choose 8GB. If you have 8GB, choose 4GB, etc. Click start and allow the stability test to run for 8 hours. Do not plan to use the system for ANYTHING else while it is running. It will run realistic AVX and handbrake workloads and if it passes 8 hours of testing it is probably about as stable as you can reasonably expect.

If you wish to check stability further you can run 12-24 hours of Prime95 Blend mode or Small FFT.

You do not need to simultaneously run HWinfo or CoreTemp while running Realbench as you should have already performed the thermal compliance test PLUS Realbench will show current CPU temperatures while it is running.

If you run the additional stability test using Prime95 Blend/Small FFT modes for 12-24 hours, you will WANT to also run HWinfo alongside it. Monitor HWinfo periodically to verify that no cores/threads are showing less than 100% usage. If it is, then that worker has errored out and the test should be stopped.

If you find there are errors on ANY of the stability tests including Realbench or Prime95, or any other stress testing utility, you need to make a change in the bios. This could be either dropping the multiplier to a lower factor or increasing the voltage while leaving the multiplier the same. If you change voltage or multiplier at ANY time, you need to start over again at the beginning and verify thermal compliance again.

A more in depth but general guide that is still intended for beginners or those who have had a small amount of experience overclocking can be found here:


*CPU overclocking guide for beginners
my motherboard has a very confusing way to adjust core voltage which is vddcr cpu voltage, and vddcr soc voltage. its the asus prime b450m so I set the voltage to auto.
 
That's what I thought... Doesn't sound like that Motherboard will allow you any finer OC than what you already have, except play with fixed voltages for both the SoC and cores.

Try lowering the voltage, little by little and see how the CPU behaves. Darkbreeze already gave you good information, so I'd suggest you act on that first and if you just can't find a combination of settings you're comfortable with, leave it on Auto. Even if 1.44v is a bit high for 3.9Ghz, it's about the speed I'd expect a non-binned 1700X to reach.

Cheers!
 

packersfan036

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May 27, 2015
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That's what I thought... Doesn't sound like that Motherboard will allow you any finer OC than what you already have, except play with fixed voltages for both the SoC and cores.

Try lowering the voltage, little by little and see how the CPU behaves. Darkbreeze already gave you good information, so I'd suggest you act on that first and if you just can't find a combination of settings you're comfortable with, leave it on Auto. Even if 1.44v is a bit high for 3.9Ghz, it's about the speed I'd expect a non-binned 1700X to reach.

Cheers!
so you think I should go for 4.0ghz?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'll be honest. In my opinion, any board that lacks manual voltage or Line load calibration settings, is a board that should not be used for overclocking because boards that lack those features are clearly boards the manufacturer did not specifically intend to be of good enough quality, with good enough power phase and deliver, to include those settings on. They don't leave those settings off as an oversight. They leave them off to discourage using them for overclocking while still being able to TECHNICALLY say they can be used for it in marketing materials.
 

packersfan036

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May 27, 2015
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5,295
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Depending on your Motherboard (which I'd say it's the biggest variance you'll be subjected to), you can leave your voltage to auto at the expense of running hotter and less efficiently.

I just went with that choice myself and it works fine keeping a couple things in mind: you have to cap the multiplier to something reasonable and you have to cap the voltage to 1.44v (this is my yellow line; my red is 1.48v and 1.5v is experimenting).

Some Motherboards will allow you this level of granularity and others will just, maybe, let you set the multiplier only.

Then you have to just play with the fixed voltage route and sacrifice a lot of power saving over a constant OC.

Cheers!
im cooling the cpu with a corsair h100i v2 aio seems to be working pretty good.
 

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