[SOLVED] cpu-z stress test multicore score falling ?

abhi471990

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May 30, 2015
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So i installed new cpu 11400f with intel stock cooler and at stock 65w tdp and motherboard msi h510m pro E. I use core temp to measure cpu load and temperature.

When i stress test my cpu. My cpu multicore score keeps on falling.

When i start the test my cpu load suddenly reach 100% my cpu temp reach 81c while cpu consume 65w and score is above 4000 but after few seconds temps fall down to 67c and cpu load stays at 100% while cpu is still consuming 65w but my multicore score starts faliing

even after 2 minutes of test my cpu temp stays at 67c while cpu load stays at 100% with cpu consuming 65w but multicore score falls around 3500

But when i bench my cpu from cpu-z my cpu multicore score stays above 4100.

Is this normal why is it hapening
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Get on a bicycle that's set in a higher gear. At first it's hard to pedal, takes a lot of energy to get going, but after a few seconds it starts getting much easier to pedal. Cpu is same way. When you open an app or start something, the cpu has a ton of stuff to do, like loading drivers, files, organizing the gpu, moving mass data from storage to ram etc so the cpu hits PL2 power state for that initial jolt. After 28 seconds, it no longer needs to do such heavy work, so settles to PL1, which is generally equivalent to TDP. In a longer running app like a stress test, you'll see that as a power consumption drop, and using less power the cores slow down, and your score follows.

Perfectly normal Intel spec'd behavior. Some motherboards can bypass this and maintain an almost indefinite PL2 (power limit 2), especially Z series mobo's.

3500 is your normal score, 4000 is your initial boosted score. That won't change unless you can lock the power limits higher or maintain a PL2 state, which is OC and will cause much higher temps.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Get on a bicycle that's set in a higher gear. At first it's hard to pedal, takes a lot of energy to get going, but after a few seconds it starts getting much easier to pedal. Cpu is same way. When you open an app or start something, the cpu has a ton of stuff to do, like loading drivers, files, organizing the gpu, moving mass data from storage to ram etc so the cpu hits PL2 power state for that initial jolt. After 28 seconds, it no longer needs to do such heavy work, so settles to PL1, which is generally equivalent to TDP. In a longer running app like a stress test, you'll see that as a power consumption drop, and using less power the cores slow down, and your score follows.

Perfectly normal Intel spec'd behavior. Some motherboards can bypass this and maintain an almost indefinite PL2 (power limit 2), especially Z series mobo's.

3500 is your normal score, 4000 is your initial boosted score. That won't change unless you can lock the power limits higher or maintain a PL2 state, which is OC and will cause much higher temps.
 

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