[SOLVED] Crosshair VII not booting( F2/F9) after instaling 3700x

Aug 27, 2019
2
1
15
0
asus Crosshair VII
amd Ryzen 3700x/1700 (old one)
Trident Z 2x8 16gb 3200 ram
evga gtx 1080

so i updated the bios to the newest version, it rebooted and went back to the bios. checked to see if it did update and it was successful. then i threw in my new 3700x and now its just showing a solid red light which means CPU and f2/f9

i checked the cpu pins and everything looks fine, this is a brand new out of the box mobo. all the fans turn on. leds turn on. cpu fan spins. all my cables are tight and properly inserted. like it just booted and updated fine idk what happened.

ROG-CROSSHAIR-VII-HERO-ASUS-2703.CAP

im now going to attempt to flash the bios with this new partitioned usb stick so wish me luck
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Try doing a hard reset of the BIOS. Sometimes simply upgrading to a newer version isn't enough, or doesn't work well when adding in a different CPU or graphics card and a hard reset becomes necessary. Not always to be sure, but I see maybe ten or fifteen of these per week where a hard reset fixes the problem so it's always at least worth trying.



BIOS hard reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Also, make sure none of the memory modules were knocked loose while working in the case AND make sure that they are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU, if you have two DIMMs installed. If you have one, it should be in the A2 slot. If you have four, obviously it's irrelevant, unless of course you have disparate kits installed and then you want to keep one kit in the A2 and B2 slots and the other kit in the A1 and B1 slots.
 
Reactions: DMAN999

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Try doing a hard reset of the BIOS. Sometimes simply upgrading to a newer version isn't enough, or doesn't work well when adding in a different CPU or graphics card and a hard reset becomes necessary. Not always to be sure, but I see maybe ten or fifteen of these per week where a hard reset fixes the problem so it's always at least worth trying.



BIOS hard reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Also, make sure none of the memory modules were knocked loose while working in the case AND make sure that they are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU, if you have two DIMMs installed. If you have one, it should be in the A2 slot. If you have four, obviously it's irrelevant, unless of course you have disparate kits installed and then you want to keep one kit in the A2 and B2 slots and the other kit in the A1 and B1 slots.
 
Reactions: DMAN999
Aug 27, 2019
2
1
15
0
Try doing a hard reset of the BIOS. Sometimes simply upgrading to a newer version isn't enough, or doesn't work well when adding in a different CPU or graphics card and a hard reset becomes necessary. Not always to be sure, but I see maybe ten or fifteen of these per week where a hard reset fixes the problem so it's always at least worth trying.



BIOS hard reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Also, make sure none of the memory modules were knocked loose while working in the case AND make sure that they are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU, if you have two DIMMs installed. If you have one, it should be in the A2 slot. If you have four, obviously it's irrelevant, unless of course you have disparate kits installed and then you want to keep one kit in the A2 and B2 slots and the other kit in the A1 and B1 slots.
i actually didnt have to do any hard resets, i just flashed the update. i had to rename the file to CH7.CAP and hold the flash button and voila im up and running and the new upgrade has given me significant fps boosts in my games! thanks for your reply i was getting so upset haha.
 
Reactions: DMAN999

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Oh, you used Flashback? Then yes, you always need to rename the update file anytime you use flashback on an ASUS board. It's usually outlined right there in the description of the version update on the BIOS update page. Glad you got it sorted out and are back in business.
 

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