CT51264BF160B vs CT51264BF160BJ

G

Guest

Guest
What is the difference between :

CT51264BF160B and CT51264BF160BJ

The specs are same, but the images look different?
The J suffixed module is not compatible with my laptop but the non-J is.

I really need to gain knowledge on this as this is making me curious.

Btw, my laptop is Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN

Thanks,
 
The issue of identifying modules based on photos was mentioned in passing by myself in the topic started by yourself here. I'm not aware of any "article" that mentions/explains identification of memory modules based on photos, but there possibly may be some.

Actually, many sellers (in particular) state that the photo of modules for sale may not be of the actual module. So the sellers often use a "generic" photo which is similar (as possible) to the actual module. The photos may be similar to the actual module, but they may not be accurate in terms of size and number of memory chips used on the modules. Therefore, identification of module (parts) can not be reliably made, and reference should be made instead to module part numbers, which in turn will usually lead to reliable module specifications elsewhere if searching online for these specifications.

Memory manufacturers usually show photos of the actual modules, but this is not always the case. For example the Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160B shows what appears to be eight memory chips (partly assumed because only four chips are actually shown on the photo of one side of the module, and it is assumed that there are an additional four chips on the other side of the module). But in fact there are sixteen memory chips used on this module (based on further research of photos and memory chip part number density elsewhere online).

Crucial series of SODIMM modules for non-Mac systems seem to start FROM 1600 MHz and then go higher in frequency. They don't have or offer any memory for non-Mac systems below 1600 MHz. So PC (ie non-Mac) users have to use 1600 MHz (or higher frequency) modules. But as stated previously, the memory will be down-clocked automatically by system BIOS to match system compatible operating memory frequency; and for the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN this memory frequency should be 1066 MHz.

Crucial do offer SODIMM's with frequencies lower than 1600 MHz, but these modules are designated for use with Mac systems. However, the difference between Mac specific memory and other (or PC) memory is virtually nil! The modules may use the exact same memory chips etc., but the only difference may be due to slight variation in programming the SPD (which stores relevant voltages, frequencies, and timings).

In general, the "Mac" specific memory should work in non-Mac (PC) systems as well (due to same memory chips being used), but the exception may be if SPD programming is such that it is tuned more towards Mac (which are more sensitive to memory characteristics, apparently), this tuning may make the memory to be not (fully) compatible with non-Mac systems.

If doing compatible memory search at Crucial, the Mac specific memory are listed as being NOT compatible with the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN, despite similar memory chips being used with compatible non-Mac memory.

Crucial are supposed to have tested all the memory with various systems, and according to those tests, the memory is either compatible or it is not compatible. However, in the case of Mac specific memory, it is suspected that Mac specific memory is not tested in non-Mac (PC) systems, and it is assumed that the Mac specific memory is incompatible with any non-Mac system(?)

From various posts at Crucial and other forums, Mac specific memory can be run in non-Mac systems, provide that memory chip architecture, density and voltage are compatible with the system.

So, this brings up the possibility of using Mac-specific memory in the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN laptop(?)

To "overclock" the non "k" CPU, means having to raise the base clock speed, which in turn increases CPU operating frequency and it also increases operating frequency of other components (which may not be a good thing, as over clocking some other components can lead to shortened lifespan).
 
The first link doesn't work.

Only a Crucial representative can say for certain what the differences are between the two modules as detailed specifications are not readily available. However, looking at the photos, the modules appear to use different memory chips with respect to each other.

The other memory chip most likely will have different architecture and/or chip density in which the laptop can't recognize and therefore won't work in the laptop.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I pasted the link twice, that's why its not working.

1st link - http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/ct51264bf160b

2nd link - http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/ct51264bf160bj

The problem is even Amazon.in advertise the 1st link as Crucial 4GB CT51264BF160B but twice they delivered the wrong part number - the CT51264BF160BJ. (Two of the order were from amzon fullfilled ones)

They answer (in the QA section) that it my supports my laptop (they will copy the part number on the product page and check for compatibility on Crucial.com, i think) and said yes, it supports ?!??

They don't even know where the problem is happening. I think they don't have the CT51264BF160B and just the other one and the advertising is wrong.

I wrote to the customer support but they keep on telling me to buy from another seller other than those whom I placed the order earlier.

What can I do now?

P.S. I don't have any retail stores or other online stores selling it :(
 
Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160BJ is NOT compatible with the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN laptop, according to Crucial memory compatibility search.

Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160B IS compatible with the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN laptop, according to Crucial memory compatibility search.

The compatibility can be easily checked by using Crucial memory search, and then entering the memory part numbers and then entering the Sony laptop model number to confirm compatibility. Or, for each of the two links posted, under the section titled "Will it work with my system?" -

select "Sony" under 'select manufacturer' box

select "VAIO VPCE Series" under 'select product line' box

then select "VAIO VPCEB34EN" under 'select model' box

then click on "check compatibility" blue box

The memory search will then show whether the memory is compatible or not. If the memory is compatible, the search will also show the Crucial (internal) part number code which is slightly different from the retail part number code.

In summary, part number CT51264BF160B IS compatible, and part number CT51264BF160BJ is NOT compatible.

If someone says part number CT51264BF160BJ is compatible with the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN laptop based on their search at Crucial website using the memory compatibility search, then they are wrong!

Had a quick look at flipkart.com, and there seem to be several sellers of Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160B. However, suggest contacting the sellers to confirm that the memory they are selling is definitely part number CT51264BF160B before ordering. If the part number they are selling is actually CT51264BF160BJ, then DON'T order it, even if seller claims the memory is compatible (it won't be!)!
 
G

Guest

Guest
I know all these, all I want is the difference between them. May be any article which simply explains difference between low and high density memory modules?
 
First, there is no "official" standard which defines what memory is low density and what memory is high density. It is subjective (open to interpretation by individuals; one individual might consider certain memory as being low density, but another individual might consider the same memory as being high density), and it is relative (when comparing two memories with different density memories).

Memory modules are composed primarily of a number of memory chips of specific density.

Memory chip density = number of memory locations/cells x data width in bits = memory chip density in bits (usually Mega bits or Giga bits due to large number of memory cells used).

Memory chip density in bytes = memory chip density in bits ÷ 8 = memory chip density in bytes (usually Mega bytes or Giga bytes due to large number of memory cells used).

In the case of Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160B, this module appears to use memory chips with 256 Mega cells at 8 bit data width.

So the memory chip density on the module CT51264BF160B = 256 Mega x 8 bits = 2 Giga bits density (2 Gb).
The equivalent memory chip density in bytes = 2 Gb ÷ 8 = 256 Mega bytes density (256 MB).

There are sixteen of these memory chips on module CT51264BF160B, so the total capacity of the module = 16x 256 MB = 4 Giga Bytes (4 GB).

In the case of Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160BJ, this module appears to use memory chips with 512 Mega cells at 8 bit data width.

So the memory chip density on the module CT51264BF160BJ = 512 Mega x 8 bits = 4 Giga bits density (4 Gb).
The equivalent memory chip density in bytes = 4 Gb ÷ 8 = 512 Mega bytes density (512 MB).

There are eight of these memory chips on module CT51264BF160BJ, so the total capacity of the module = 8 x 512 MB = 4 Giga Bytes (4 GB).


So, the module CT51264BF160B uses 2 Gb (= 256 MB) density memory chips.

The module CT51264BF160BJ uses 4 Gb (= 512 MB) density memory chips.

It can be said that module CT51264BF160B uses lower density memory chips with respect to module CT51264BF160BJ. Or, module CT51264BF160BJ uses higher density memory chips with respect to module CT51264BF160B.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Wow, that's useful. Thanks.

Also, CT2KIT51264BF160B and CT2KIT51264BF160BJ (note "J" at end) are both 2X4 GB kit and both being made with (8 chips in total). But how come the non-J version is only compatible and not the "J" suffixed part? (Cause both were identical in density)

One more question: How come my laptop support upto 1600MHz DDR3 modules (as said by crucial memory advisor) when the CPU can handle only DDR-3 800/1066 MHZ (as from http://ark.intel.com/products/49020/Intel-Core-i3-370M-Processor-3M-cache-2_40-GHz) ??
 


First, the Crucial memory part numbers CT2KIT51264BF160B and CT2KIT51264BF160BJ are basically the dual channel kit versions of part numbers CT51264BF160B and CT51264BF160BJ. Each kit contains two compatible single modules which have been tested to endure compatibility with each other.

The modules within the kit are the same as the individual modules, so the number of chips and chip densities for the modules are the same as for the individual modules.

So dual channel kit part number CT2KIT51264BF160B has modules each with 16 memory chips and at a density of 2 Gb, just like the individual module part number CT51264BF160B.

And dual channel kit part number CT2KIT51264BF160BJ has modules each with 8 memory chips and at a density of 4 Gb, just like the individual module part number CT51264BF160BJ.

The photos of the dual channel kit modules at Crucial website are not entirely correct. They seem to be using "generic" similar style modules for the photos instead, so identification of number of memory chips used may not be accurate.

This issue of identifying modules based on photos was mentioned in another topic recently I believe. It was mentioned that frequently sellers and even memory manufacturers may not always use the actual photo of the module in question. Instead they use photos similar to the module, probably because they do not want to spend too much time and money photographing every model and variation of memory modules.



The laptop doesn't support 1600 MHz (and higher frequency) modules as such. What happens is that the laptop BIOS will automatically down-clock the memory frequency to make it compatible with the laptop. In this case 1600 MHz memory will (should) be down-clocked to 1066 MHz.

Another example, memory rated at, say, 1866 MHz will be down-clocked also to 1066 MHz to make it run compatibly with the laptop.
 
G

Guest

Guest
This issue of identifying modules based on photos was mentioned in another topic recently I believe.
Can you link me to the article, please?

The laptop doesn't support 1600 MHz (and higher frequency) modules as such. What happens is that the laptop BIOS will automatically down-clock the memory frequency to make it compatible with the laptop. In this case 1600 MHz memory will (should) be down-clocked to 1066 MHz.

Another example, memory rated at, say, 1866 MHz will be down-clocked also to 1066 MHz to make it run compatibly with the laptop.
OH GOD! Why don't crucial recommend me 1066 MHz modules when using crucial memory advisor ?!? :(

Also, intel i5 (desktop) cpus support upto only 1600MHz, right? But I have seen (in internet) they've been used with 1866 MHz or higher speed modules since their motherboard support those speeds? (btw, I'm talking about non-"k" CPUs)
 
The issue of identifying modules based on photos was mentioned in passing by myself in the topic started by yourself here. I'm not aware of any "article" that mentions/explains identification of memory modules based on photos, but there possibly may be some.

Actually, many sellers (in particular) state that the photo of modules for sale may not be of the actual module. So the sellers often use a "generic" photo which is similar (as possible) to the actual module. The photos may be similar to the actual module, but they may not be accurate in terms of size and number of memory chips used on the modules. Therefore, identification of module (parts) can not be reliably made, and reference should be made instead to module part numbers, which in turn will usually lead to reliable module specifications elsewhere if searching online for these specifications.

Memory manufacturers usually show photos of the actual modules, but this is not always the case. For example the Crucial memory part number CT51264BF160B shows what appears to be eight memory chips (partly assumed because only four chips are actually shown on the photo of one side of the module, and it is assumed that there are an additional four chips on the other side of the module). But in fact there are sixteen memory chips used on this module (based on further research of photos and memory chip part number density elsewhere online).

Crucial series of SODIMM modules for non-Mac systems seem to start FROM 1600 MHz and then go higher in frequency. They don't have or offer any memory for non-Mac systems below 1600 MHz. So PC (ie non-Mac) users have to use 1600 MHz (or higher frequency) modules. But as stated previously, the memory will be down-clocked automatically by system BIOS to match system compatible operating memory frequency; and for the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN this memory frequency should be 1066 MHz.

Crucial do offer SODIMM's with frequencies lower than 1600 MHz, but these modules are designated for use with Mac systems. However, the difference between Mac specific memory and other (or PC) memory is virtually nil! The modules may use the exact same memory chips etc., but the only difference may be due to slight variation in programming the SPD (which stores relevant voltages, frequencies, and timings).

In general, the "Mac" specific memory should work in non-Mac (PC) systems as well (due to same memory chips being used), but the exception may be if SPD programming is such that it is tuned more towards Mac (which are more sensitive to memory characteristics, apparently), this tuning may make the memory to be not (fully) compatible with non-Mac systems.

If doing compatible memory search at Crucial, the Mac specific memory are listed as being NOT compatible with the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN, despite similar memory chips being used with compatible non-Mac memory.

Crucial are supposed to have tested all the memory with various systems, and according to those tests, the memory is either compatible or it is not compatible. However, in the case of Mac specific memory, it is suspected that Mac specific memory is not tested in non-Mac (PC) systems, and it is assumed that the Mac specific memory is incompatible with any non-Mac system(?)

From various posts at Crucial and other forums, Mac specific memory can be run in non-Mac systems, provide that memory chip architecture, density and voltage are compatible with the system.

So, this brings up the possibility of using Mac-specific memory in the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN laptop(?)

To "overclock" the non "k" CPU, means having to raise the base clock speed, which in turn increases CPU operating frequency and it also increases operating frequency of other components (which may not be a good thing, as over clocking some other components can lead to shortened lifespan).
 

doh

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Jul 9, 2012
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To address a couple of detailed points raised by Gamer Guy and not covered in the series of excellent answers by his correspondent, brispuss

Crucial have more than p/n for identical modules. So the generic p/n CT51264BF160B (for example) is the generic p/n, while the p/n which comes up after you do a compatibility search for your viao will be different (you may not have not have noticed). There is a not-commonly available one way translator for short (specific) p/n to long (generic) p/n. Thus some Mac modules may appear to have different p/ns but really that's just the Mac number for the generic part.

Crucial used to recommend PC3-8500 (DDR3-1066) or PC3-1066 (DDR3-1333) modules such as CT51264BF1339 for my laptop, but now the recommended p/n is the equivalent of the CT51264BF160B. This is because the latter (faster) part is compatible with my laptop (and yours as explained earlier), as were the former, but Crucial(Micron) no longer manufacture the 1066MHz or 1333MHz modules.

The CT51264BF160BJ are compatible with 4th and 5th generation intel CPUs it seems (those with integrated chipsets ?)

Doh
HP Pavilion dm4-1050ea (2 x 4GB CT51264BC1067) Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
 

Fabio_5

Commendable
Apr 23, 2016
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Capitan here
the Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN has a first generation Core iX cpu, those cpus doesn't support 512MB memory chips, so as the j version is a 4GB module with 8 chips (Single Rank), 4096/8 = 512
You should looking for dimms with 256MB chips, as there are needed 16 chips those are even referred as Dual Rank
Also the cpu is incompatible with Quad Rank modules too, and timing for 1066 are 7-7-7 or 8-8-8, for 800 6-6-6

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/embedded/products/calpella/core-mobile-datasheet-vol-1.html
 

doh

Honorable
Jul 9, 2012
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Good answer Fabio_5
The sums you have done also show that for this context the CT15264BF160B chips are low density DRAM chips (and twice as many are needed, 16) and the CT51264BF160BJ chips are high density chips (and half as many are needed, 8). See the pictures of actual SO-DIMMs and count the chips (the modules are double sided). In more technical spec documents, this information is given.

Higher speed modules are compatible because they are automatically downclocked the mb/CPU capacity.

Doh!
23.April.20156
 
Oct 9, 2019
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What is the difference between :

CT51264BF160B and CT51264BF160BJ

The specs are same, but the images look different?
The J suffixed module is not compatible with my laptop but the non-J is.

I really need to gain knowledge on this as this is making me curious.

Btw, my laptop is Sony VAIO VPCEB34EN

Thanks,
The simple answer to this question.
CT51264BF160B has 4 memory chips on both sides
CT51264BF160BJ has 8 chips on a single side to make it a slightly smaller profile.

Hopefully this helps.
 

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