Question Currently trying to figure out what PSU/cooling system I need for building my first computer

May 27, 2020
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I'm currently stuck in an endless loop with PSU, cases, and cooling. I'm looking at getting a computer with an i7 9700k processor, MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard, and a 2060S graphics card. The next thing I went to do was find a cooler that would work well, which I discovered was tied to power requirements as certain coolers I'd found that were recommended by various sites didn't work according to others. To figure out which was correct I went to outervisions Power Supply Calculator, which requires the cooling system to tell me how much power the system would need, which means I can neither find a PSU nor a cooler so far as I can tell, which means I can't decide on a case. As for coolers I'm undecided on whether I want air cooling or AIO and also am not sure whether I'd need more than one. Any help is appreciated.
 

Vyrvelata

Upstanding
May 19, 2020
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I don't really quite get the question... if its air cooler... as long as it supported by your socket (1151), and by the height of your case (big air coolers are really high), you won't have any problems.

In terms of Power supply, a fan is consuming between 1-3W (usually 1.8W), and that's all a CPU cooler has, one fan, the cooler itself is passive it does not need electricity.
Normal build has 3 fans, 1 front, 1back, 1 cpu (1 PSU, but anyawy)...
You will have around 3 fans x 2W = 6W... how is that connected to what power supply you need, 6W is not concern in any way ?
If you gonna Water cool it, its completely different story.

Your choice of PSU should be based on the system... the 2060 itself on average requires 500W PSU (the whole system), so you might get 550 - 600W quality power supply and you should be perfectly fine, if you want to OC 650 is more than enough.
About case...... it's about a lot of factors (cooling, reviews, your preferences, cages, IO, form factor, etc..) but if it's reasonably priced it should be good overall.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Bob Bobinski
May 27, 2020
3
0
10
0
I don't really quite get the question... if its air cooler... as long as it supported by your socket (1151), and by the height of your case (big air coolers are really high), you won't have any problems.

In terms of Power supply, a fan is consuming between 1-3W (usually 1.8W), and that's all a CPU cooler has, one fan, the cooler itself is passive it does not need electricity.
Normal build has 3 fans, 1 front, 1back, 1 cpu (1 PSU, but anyawy)...
You will have around 3 fans x 2W = 6W... how is that connected to what power supply you need, 6W is not concern in any way ?
If you gonna Water cool it, its completely different story.

Your choice of PSU should be based on the system... the 2060 itself on average requires 500W PSU (the whole system), so you might get 550 - 600W quality power supply and you should be perfectly fine, if you want to OC 650 is more than enough.
About case...... it's about a lot of factors (cooling, reviews, your preferences, cages, IO, form factor, etc..) but if it's reasonably priced it should be good overall.
How would water cooling change it?
Edit: And also does this mean that I should try to find 3 fans or water cooling systems that combined cool 650 Watts?
 
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Karadjgne

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The 9700k is a 200w possible cpu on average. The 2060 super can pull 200w (yes I know official nvidia TDP is only 175w). Figure the entire rest of the pc can pull @ 100w between rgb, fans, drives, USB, Sata, whatnot.

That's 500w at max, (never happen, almost impossible to max every draw simultaneously) so at a very minimum will be a decent 500w psu (good luck with that, there aren't any I can think of).

Which for a really decent-excellent psu, a minimum of 550w for that combo, but many will go 650w just because, or the price happens to be better on sale than the 550w. Corsair RMx, Seasonic Prime or similar class psu, no worries at 550w, a Corsair CX or similar budget psu, better off with the 650w.

Cooling depends on your preferences and the case. For air a Noctua NH-U12A or bigger, beQuiet Darkrock 4 or bigger, basically anything in the 220w+ class of cooler is going to be peachy decent with temps and noise. If that's not your bag, there's always the aios, a decent 240mm will work, a decent 280mm will work better and any 360mm won't be an issue.

But that all depends on exactly how much clearance your case has for an aircooler OR exactly which radiator sizes your case can fit.

With aircooling, just don't forget to add in extra fans, the case normally (unless it's a snazzy RGB/ARGB specific case) will usually come with just 2 case fans, and thats entirely insufficient to be honest.

First and foremost, decide what type of cooling you want to use, liquid and air are basically the same ability at 250w or under, it's all liquid at 250w+.

Once you decide on type, figure out prefences, for almost all 220w+ class coolers a minimum of 160mm of clearance in any case. For aios a 240mm will fit in a 360mm (both use 120mm fans) and most 280mm cases will also fit a 240mm (couple extra holes). So preference.

That sets up minimums, 160mm air, 360/280mm liquid. Use PCPartPicker, and start shopping for 10-15 or more cases you really like the looks of. Nix the ones that simply cost too much. Research the cooler fitment, even if you have to go searching websites for the case specs. Nix any that don't meet the criteria of clearances.

You might end up with 4 or 5 (maybe less) that meet cooler needs and you really like the look of and are in budget. Then get picky about the stupid stuff like where the connectors are in front or too much plastic or reviews say it's flimsy etc. You'll end up with 1 or 2 that fit all your needs/wants. Pick the one that's better for you.

Then go get a cooler to fit, the psu to power and you are in business.
 
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Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
So essentially no benefits unless you really need to keep it cool?
Air and liquid coolers have their pros and cons, but to see most of the pros of liquid, you have to pay a premium for it. Their biggest con is price to performance.
For air, I'd say their biggest con is that many rapidly fall from the competition at over 200w, and just a few models can hang with 250w. They just can't compete with the thermal transfer of liquid when it involves space heaters.

Below... say, 100USD, air coolers pretty much dominate. Don't even look at a liquid cooler unless it's for a specific project.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Bah. People always stuck on what is, not on what isn't.

Good aio costs @ $99-149 usually, the more expensive versions almost always have RGB fans. A good aircooler will run @ $80-100. Now add in a couple of case fans (forgot them did you?) at @ $15 each. Aio costs $99-$149, aircooler + case fans costs $110-$130.

Price is negligible. Unless of course you want to spend $40-$50 per fan for the better ARGB, in which case aircooling kinda exceeds AIO, which already includes the fancy lighting.

A case can be made for either cooling type being cheaper or more expensive, it's all determined by exactly WHICH models are wanted, not WHAT type is wanted.
 

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