[SOLVED] Custom loop had began falling out

William_188

Commendable
Dec 30, 2016
8
0
1,510
0
Hello TomsHardware! In late April I completed my latest system. In which I ran my custom loop with EKWB CryoFuel opaque cloud white fluid. The liter of fluid was also purchased in April from MicroCenter. On the lid reads “23.01.2019 5-01/19”. Make of that what you will. So, to clarify this was a brand new loop starting in April. However, over the past 24 hours I’ve noticed that the loop has gone pretty much clear and that I now have tons of white particles floating around the top of my loop when it’s not in operation. When I turn the pump on it all mixes and looks like the cloud white I originally had, but you can visibly see that it’s just cloudiness from the particles mixing.

So, my question is: what to do? I’m assuming I should drain and flush the loop. However, I’d like some pointers as to what I can do in order to maintain the opaque color of my future liquid, what fluid other than EK would be best for long term, etc. thanks for reading!

PC:
RTX 2080 Vector EKWB
EK Supremacy EVO RGB
EK coolstream 360 (x2)
Primoflex 1/2”x 3/4” soft tubing
Corsair SP 120 (x6)

Pictures:
View: http://imgur.com/ti8Yxvb

View: http://imgur.com/Oh5CvDI

View: http://imgur.com/pxsP8ak

View: http://imgur.com/VBt985m

View: http://imgur.com/UGiN9Lf
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
With all due respect, your system looks like the watercooling parts weren't flushed properly. EKWB actually use Mayhem's to make them their pastel range of coolants. If the loop is acidic or alkaline(I forgot which side of the spectrum it was) the particles tend to break down and fall out.

You should tear down your entire loop, disassemble the blocks and inspect for any gunk ups in your blocks. Reassemble the loop but flush the system with their blitz kit.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
With all due respect, your system looks like the watercooling parts weren't flushed properly. EKWB actually use Mayhem's to make them their pastel range of coolants. If the loop is acidic or alkaline(I forgot which side of the spectrum it was) the particles tend to break down and fall out.

You should tear down your entire loop, disassemble the blocks and inspect for any gunk ups in your blocks. Reassemble the loop but flush the system with their blitz kit.
Yep, agree with this.

If radiators are not properly flushed prior to install, you get all sorts of garbage chemicals and oils flushed out once the loop starts operating. This can really wreck havoc on coolants that are intended to be 'viewer friendly'.
 
Reactions: William_188

William_188

Commendable
Dec 30, 2016
8
0
1,510
0
With all due respect, your system looks like the watercooling parts weren't flushed properly. EKWB actually use Mayhem's to make them their pastel range of coolants. If the loop is acidic or alkaline(I forgot which side of the spectrum it was) the particles tend to break down and fall out.

You should tear down your entire loop, disassemble the blocks and inspect for any gunk ups in your blocks. Reassemble the loop but flush the system with their blitz kit.
In all fairness I could accept that reality. I did a shock treatment of sorts with the PrimoChill preboot for about 48 hours. I then flushed the system with distilled water, and then I finally filled it with the opaque fluid. So, I’m not really sure where my error was in the ordeal. Anyways, thanks for your advice! I’ll be sure to order mayhems blitz and tear everything down. (To my dread and dismay lol)

Disclaimer: first time water cooler :p
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
Correctly rinsing radiators can be a tricky ordeal. Normally I will soak mine in very hot, soapy water (dish detergent works well) and then slosh as much as I can out, while rinsing in between.

If I wanted to be 100% certain, I would then run a loop mixture of 50/50 water and vinegar through the loop via pond pump, then rinse again, 50% vinegar pump again, rinse one last time.

There are so many oils and often residual debris inside a radiator when you pull it out of the box for the first time and most of that stuff can react with coolants...large chunks can cause pump damage, if they exist.
 
Reactions: William_188

William_188

Commendable
Dec 30, 2016
8
0
1,510
0
Correctly rinsing radiators can be a tricky ordeal. Normally I will soak mine in very hot, soapy water (dish detergent works well) and then slosh as much as I can out, while rinsing in between.

If I wanted to be 100% certain, I would then run a loop mixture of 50/50 water and vinegar through the loop via pond pump, then rinse again, 50% vinegar pump again, rinse one last time.

There are so many oils and often residual debris inside a radiator when you pull it out of the box for the first time and most of that stuff can react with coolants...large chunks can cause pump damage, if they exist.
How long would you recommend the vinegar water solution be run for? Currently tearing everything down and flushing the system.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
Couple hours to overnight at the most.

If you have a submersible pond pump, you can submerge in a bucket and have the tubing loop back around so that you can get particulates out and not circulate them back through the radiator. You could even go a step further and put pantyhose or mesh over the discharge end to prevent the pump from circulating it back, as well.

If you don't have a submersible pond pump, you'll just need to ensure the radiator is rinsed well before beginning.
 
Reactions: William_188

ASK THE COMMUNITY