Question Dark Rock Pro 4 or H150i PRO RGB for 3900x?

naftiacore

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Sep 4, 2018
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I can't decide which one should I get, the price of the AIO is double. But I prefer the look of the AIO much better, and I'm not sure, but the AIO should performance better in summer? I know the AIO is better with only a few temps but I'm not sure if it's worth the double price. I'm planning to use it with a 3900x and OC as much as possible by the time. Also I'm gonna have Trident Z RGB memory, and maybe the Dark Rock Pro would cover them. The AIO fits in my budget, but i could spend that +100$ on my GPU, altought I'm not gonna play that much, it's gonna be a Premiere workstation.
 

Phaaze88

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Here's my 2 cents regarding air VS AIO coolers:
-From a performance-only perspective, AIO is inferior to air until you get to the space heaters like the 9900K, Intel's X series, and the high core count(12+) Threadrippers.
Below a 360mm AIO, there's an air cooler that will beat it for far less.

-Aesthetics are subjective, but the AIOs appear to be more popular in that regard.

-AIOs do have a slight edge on idle temps VS air because liquid transfers heat better, and so the idle 'spikes' aren't as high.

-AIOs are more expensive.

-AIOs are potentially louder, because they have more sources of noise. Some newer models have gone an added a motherboard VRM cooling fan...

-AIOs have more points of failure - fans, pump, and VRM fan - if it has one. Air coolers just have fans.

-AIOs are more dependent of good case airflow, because the radiator itself adds another obstacle for air to pass through, requiring the user to run their fans higher or getting new fans to make up for that extra resistance.

-There's also the pros and cons of silence-focused VS performance-focused coolers, but I think that'll drag this on too long...

IMO, there's really not much in favor of AIOs other than aesthetics, case clearance, and getting models below 360mm.
What is your case? The Dark Rock Pro 4 does allow you to raise the fan so it sits on top of your ram, but you need extra case clearance to accommodate.
 
I can't decide which one should I get, the price of the AIO is double. But I prefer the look of the AIO much better, and I'm not sure, but the AIO should performance better in summer? I know the AIO is better with only a few temps but I'm not sure if it's worth the double price. I'm planning to use it with a 3900x and OC as much as possible by the time. Also I'm gonna have Trident Z RGB memory, and maybe the Dark Rock Pro would cover them. The AIO fits in my budget, but i could spend that +100$ on my GPU, altought I'm not gonna play that much, it's gonna be a Premiere workstation.
That AIO is much better for high count CPUs than any air cooler but that doesn't mean that good air cooler would not be enough for normal use. Go ahead and put that AIO in specially on account of intended OC there's no air cooler that can do that as well.
 

naftiacore

Prominent
Sep 4, 2018
16
0
510
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Here's my 2 cents regarding air VS AIO coolers:
-From a performance-only perspective, AIO is inferior to air until you get to the space heaters like the 9900K, Intel's X series, and the high core count(12+) Threadrippers.
Below a 360mm AIO, there's an air cooler that will beat it for far less.

-Aesthetics are subjective, but the AIOs appear to be more popular in that regard.

-AIOs do have a slight edge on idle temps VS air because liquid transfers heat better, and so the idle 'spikes' aren't as high.

-AIOs are more expensive.

-AIOs are potentially louder, because they have more sources of noise. Some newer models have gone an added a motherboard VRM cooling fan...

-AIOs have more points of failure - fans, pump, and VRM fan - if it has one. Air coolers just have fans.

-AIOs are more dependent of good case airflow, because the radiator itself adds another obstacle for air to pass through, requiring the user to run their fans higher or getting new fans to make up for that extra resistance.

-There's also the pros and cons of silence-focused VS performance-focused coolers, but I think that'll drag this on too long...

IMO, there's really not much in favor of AIOs other than aesthetics, case clearance, and getting models below 360mm.
What is your case? The Dark Rock Pro 4 does allow you to raise the fan so it sits on top of your ram, but you need extra case clearance to accommodate.
Thank you, so I've looked after the DRP4 and realised it would fit with my rams but I could see nothing from it. I've looked after the 360mm Artic Liquid Freezer II, it almost costs as much as the DRP4, so it would be half of the corsair one with almost similar performance. (Based on reviews on the 280mm model and some amazon ones, where ppl used it with 3950x, and also it was at level of the NZXT and Corsair ones) so rn I really can't decide what should I get..
 

Phaaze88

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Ambassador
Thank you, so I've looked after the DRP4 and realised it would fit with my rams but I could see nothing from it. I've looked after the 360mm Artic Liquid Freezer II, it almost costs as much as the DRP4, so it would be half of the corsair one with almost similar performance. (Based on reviews on the 280mm model and some amazon ones, where ppl used it with 3950x, and also it was at level of the NZXT and Corsair ones) so rn I really can't decide what should I get..
1)What is the model of your case? I could tell you whether or not a cooler like the DRP4 would fit with the Trident Z without issue or not.

2)If you're that serious about wanting to overclock, then go the Intel route with a 9900K and a 360mm AIO.
Ryzen 3000 has no real OC headroom to speak of. The online guides with general/universal settings are invalid; people have actually managed to degrade and destroy their cpus following said guides:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/ejgc6p View: https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/ejgc6p/1325v_is_not_safe_for_zen_2/?ref_source=embed&ref=share

No one really knows what settings are safe; they can vary heavily per cpu.

3)The best route to higher performance on Ryzen 3000 currently is good cooling - the chips are temperature sensitive, and memory frequency up to 3733mhz while tightening the timings - look up Ryzen Dram Calculator guides.

4)How much noise are you comfortable with? There are performance-oriented AIOs and silence-oriented ones.
The performance models are going to cool better than the quieter ones, but not significantly so, and not until the higher rpm ranges, where they are loud.

The silent models are going to cool better than the performance ones at lower rpms, but there's no extra performance to be had out of the box(weaker fans), and this hurts them in that the high end air coolers end up outperforming them while being quieter...
Well, this is comparing air coolers to 280mm or less AIOs. The current lineup of air coolers can't really touch the cooling capacity of 360mm AIOs.
 

naftiacore

Prominent
Sep 4, 2018
16
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510
0
1)What is the model of your case? I could tell you whether or not a cooler like the DRP4 would fit with the Trident Z without issue or not.

2)If you're that serious about wanting to overclock, then go the Intel route with a 9900K and a 360mm AIO.
Ryzen 3000 has no real OC headroom to speak of. The online guides with general/universal settings are invalid; people have actually managed to degrade and destroy their cpus following said guides:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/ejgc6p View: https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/ejgc6p/1325v_is_not_safe_for_zen_2/?ref_source=embed&ref=share

No one really knows what settings are safe; they can vary heavily per cpu.

3)The best route to higher performance on Ryzen 3000 currently is good cooling - the chips are temperature sensitive, and memory frequency up to 3733mhz while tightening the timings - look up Ryzen Dram Calculator guides.

4)How much noise are you comfortable with? There are performance-oriented AIOs and silence-oriented ones.
The performance models are going to cool better than the quieter ones, but not significantly so, and not until the higher rpm ranges, where they are loud.

The silent models are going to cool better than the performance ones at lower rpms, but there's no extra performance to be had out of the box(weaker fans), and this hurts them in that the high end air coolers end up outperforming them while being quieter...
Well, this is comparing air coolers to 280mm or less AIOs. The current lineup of air coolers can't really touch the cooling capacity of 360mm AIOs.

I didn't decided the case yet, It's gonna be a P600s or a BQ Silent Base 801. I could fit the DRP4 in both, but my problem is that it would cover the RAM's and my motherboard's RGB (Strix 570-E). Actually, do I really need a 360mm AIO for a 3900? The corsair one i've mentioned is similar in noise as the DRP4. Btw I really started worrying about the AIO if it leaks, or shouldn't I ?
 

Phaaze88

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Ambassador
I didn't decided the case yet, It's gonna be a P600s or a BQ Silent Base 801. I could fit the DRP4 in both, but my problem is that it would cover the RAM's and my motherboard's RGB (Strix 570-E).
Oh, you hadn't decided on a case yet - got it.
The front fan on the DRP4 would sit on top of your ram, so yes, it would cover it.

Actually, do I really need a 360mm AIO for a 3900?
Unless you're serious about wanting to OC that cpu regardless of the downsides, then no, you don't need a 360mm AIO.
These cpus are very power efficient on their stock settings. Even with PBO enabled and in the worst case scenario, the 3900X pulls just under 180w: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ryzen-9-3900x-7-3700x-review,6214-3.html
Overclock it, and you throw power efficiency out the window - probably closer to 220w.

The corsair one i've mentioned is similar in noise as the DRP4. Btw I really started worrying about the AIO if it leaks, or shouldn't I ?
Which Corsair one? You didn't state specifically which model?

Leaking is rare - less than 10% chance, but the possibility exists and shouldn't be ignored.
 

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