[SOLVED] Data Drive Transition Question

versionmanager

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I'm currently in the process of pulling of my hard drives out of a Desktop PC and putting them into my newly built Gaming / Home PC. The specs are listed below. I'm currently running the Windows 10 Home on both machines .

The problem I have run into in the past on wipe and reloads or transfer of drives , is that that the ownership of the 'data' drives changes over to an arbitrary elongated set of digits that that begins with a letter "S". Keep in mind this is not the C drive but a partitioned, WD standard drive.

In the past I have run a TakeOwnership utility but I have still needed to borrow in to all subdirectories rather than running against the parent directory in order to take back ownership.

I no longer want to spend hours doing this. The data is composed of the usual suspects as well as .mp3s, .mp4s, and .jpgs. The media and historical data is of value.

Has anyone ever dealt with this type of issue.

Thanks in advance.
 

versionmanager

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if the data is not in any user's libraries, then it should be usable by everyone and simply needs to be plugged in the new system to be recognized.

the only time i have ever seen issues is when people try to move the user folders elsewhere.

simply create new random folders titled music, movies, pics....etc and put the files there. then it does not matter what system they get plugged into, it's just simple data with no owner to worry about.

i've moved many drives like this and never had an ownership issue so long as you avoid user folders!!
So it sounds like building a Parent folder on the destination drive with access allowed to "Everyone" and then copy over the preexisting files and folders sunder this new Parent folder.

I assume that the Parent permissions will be inherited by the moved subfolders. Will this happen automatically or need to be altered in Windows 10?

I see a reference above to the creation of random subfolders but t would like to retain the original Directory structure. Thoughts?
 

Math Geek

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if the data is not in any user's libraries, then it should be usable by everyone and simply needs to be plugged in the new system to be recognized.

the only time i have ever seen issues is when people try to move the user folders elsewhere.

simply create new random folders titled music, movies, pics....etc and put the files there. then it does not matter what system they get plugged into, it's just simple data with no owner to worry about.

i've moved many drives like this and never had an ownership issue so long as you avoid user folders!!
 

versionmanager

Reputable
Dec 19, 2016
121
3
4,595
1
if the data is not in any user's libraries, then it should be usable by everyone and simply needs to be plugged in the new system to be recognized.

the only time i have ever seen issues is when people try to move the user folders elsewhere.

simply create new random folders titled music, movies, pics....etc and put the files there. then it does not matter what system they get plugged into, it's just simple data with no owner to worry about.

i've moved many drives like this and never had an ownership issue so long as you avoid user folders!!
So it sounds like building a Parent folder on the destination drive with access allowed to "Everyone" and then copy over the preexisting files and folders sunder this new Parent folder.

I assume that the Parent permissions will be inherited by the moved subfolders. Will this happen automatically or need to be altered in Windows 10?

I see a reference above to the creation of random subfolders but t would like to retain the original Directory structure. Thoughts?
 

Math Geek

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Ambassador
no need to mess with permissions. just make a folder for the data and move it all there. organize it however you want. so long as it is not part of a user library, then it will automatically be available to every user who uses the machine. it's that simple :)
 

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