Question Data Processing

Mar 17, 2019
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How data is processed, i mean when we open a program in widows and work in it or we play game or a play video how that program or instructions go through and process?
like in a sequence how they get into different devices from input til output.?
like clicking through mouse or keyboard or touch-surface, do instruction go through controllers(Chipset)--->then Ram----->again Chipsets----->then processor---->again chipset--->Then SDRAM---->VGA or HDMI port--->Screen or monitor?
is that right?
 
Someone asked similarly-worded question couple of weeks ago. It's not that simple, even if you abstract hardware. There's no single data being processed - your mouse click will travel more or less the way you describe, but there are gazillions other events happening which go different ways, or stay inside eg chipset.

Is this some kind of homework?
 
Mar 17, 2019
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Someone asked similarly-worded question couple of weeks ago. It's not that simple, even if you abstract hardware. There's no single data being processed - your mouse click will travel more or less the way you describe, but there are gazillions other events happening which go different ways, or stay inside eg chipset.

Is this some kind of homework?
no this is not homework, i am student of computer science and i did compTIA A+ as well but i am still confused about this process.
can you please describe as much as you know please.
it is very important to me.
share your knowledge too and if u have any sort of source then please share with me, any link or book.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
The question is far too broad. As pointed out above, different types of events and data go through different paths around the system. Some devices work by periodic polling from its drivers, others can generate interrupts as-needed to get CPU/OS attention. Some support master-master DMA to transfer data autonomously, others have to be accessed by polling or at least require much tighter OS/driver supervision.

There is no shortage of possible permutations, especially after you toss OS/software side considerations on top.
 
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AllanGH

Commendable
Mar 10, 2019
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i am student of computer science and i did compTIA A+ as well
The primary responsibility of a student, as you may well know, is to teach themselves. This is accomplished through inquisitiveness and the work of research. So far, you really have not shown the resources that you have used for research, and illustrated those specific areas of your research that you are confused by.

can you please describe as much as you know please.
You are asking others to teach you and, while you may be polite about it, you are asking for treatise-level responses to several very general questions; which are best answered by doing targeted Internet searches, and reading your textbooks.

You will feel a greater sense of accomplishment and ownership of your acquired knowledge if you undertake the responsibilities of the student, instead of imposing upon the time of others, implying that the posing of a question requires the typing of several pages of information that you can easily obtain and read by using Google in the way that it was intended.
 
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ex_bubblehead

Glorious
Moderator
no this is not homework, i am student of computer science and i did compTIA A+ as well but i am still confused about this process....
If you are in a Computer Science course of study, and hold an A+ (not really that prestigious a certification, but still) you should already have a reasonable handle on such subjects. I would be worried to have you as an employee. And, as already said, there is plenty of material out there for you to be doing your own research.
 
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InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
An old edition (2000ish or older) of "How to Build and Repair PCs" might be a good place to start. IIRC, it went into reasonable details explaining how stuff worked and simple parallel busses with control lines should be more intuitive to understand than today's much more complex serial protocols - asserting an IRQ# line in old XT/AT/VESA/AGP/PCI bus is far more intuitive than slipping an interrupt command into a serial data protocol on PCIe.
 
Reactions: Abs2428
Mar 17, 2019
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If you are in a Computer Science course of study, and hold an A+ (not really that prestigious a certification, but still) you should already have a reasonable handle on such subjects. I would be worried to have you as an employee. And, as already said, there is plenty of material out there for you to be doing your own research.
oh man this doesnt mean i realy dont know nothing about how data is processed , common
these sentences are humiliating i swear.
i just wanted you guys's ideas whether i am 100% right about what i know.
common
 
Mar 17, 2019
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An old edition (2000ish or older) of "How to Build and Repair PCs" might be a good place to start. IIRC, it went into reasonable details explaining how stuff worked and simple parallel busses with control lines should be more intuitive to understand than today's much more complex serial protocols - asserting an IRQ# line in old XT/AT/VESA/AGP/PCI bus is far more intuitive than slipping an interrupt command into a serial data protocol on PCIe.
thank you i knew about that book but i couldn't find that
now i find it
 
Mar 17, 2019
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i think so instead of recommending to do online research, u guys better share what you know.
i swear i know to some extend, but as you guys said that the internal process is that complex that can't be easily explained in few lines i know that...
i just wanted to know whether i am correct about what i asked and mentioned above
 
The question, as already mentioned, is too broad.

But these days, everything is divided into PROCESSES. When a programmer creates a Application, he needs keyboard input, he calls a pre-written API (Google for API). This API is provided by the OS and basically is a programming routing just sitting there waiting for keystroke and store them into a buffer. The API then provides the keystrokes to the App when invoked. That's why when you open Task Manager, you got nothing running but then all these processes sitting there, they are waiting for requests.

The hardware is dealt directly by DRIVERS, they are then very small, and efficient codes that contain how to get data in and out from the device, what to do to initialize, reset, diagnostic etc. Drivers deal with a specific hardware.

A programmer will be able to details all the pieces, basically is all LAYERED, and there are layers of codes between the user and the hardware.

This was easier to understand when Apps were single-threaded (DOS), one thing happens at a time after another. With the advent of multitasking came the concept of MESSAGING AND PROCESSES.
 
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