DDoS Attacks Took Down Blizzard's Games, Online Services

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RomeoReject

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Why don't countries start prosecuting these little script kiddies? The activity might stop when there's the potential for jailtime.
 

jtd871

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@RomeoReject I'm gonna guess that there are significant penalties that can be brought to bear (e.g., terrorism charges, organized crime charges), but actually gathering enough evidence to make charges stick is difficult.

I will also hazard that it's difficult to track/find the command and control of an established botnet because the traffic required to control a botnet vs that which can be generated by a botnet is very small, and anybody worth their salt will also use a (probably dedicated) subnet of compromised machines to do all the heavy lifting and keep everything at several removes from the actual human controller(s).
 

firefoxx04

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The guy in the corner at Starbucks could be running the botnet.. with a laptop bought on Craigslist in a city 100 miles away, orchestrating virtual servers in the cloud (purchased with Bitcoin), which then control the bot net. No paper trail. How do you prosecute that?
 

southernshark

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Plus you have to consider that most people on the planet live in a country where prosecution isn't going to happen. Outside of the USA and Western Europe, the odds of a prosecution drop significantly. I worked for a US company in Guatemala for a couple years. They don't prosecute the vast majority of homicides in the country. You think DNS attacks are going to get an investigation?
 
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