DDR3 Memory??

ahumphers91

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Oct 2, 2009
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I am buying a GA-MA770T-UD3P motherboard. It says i can overclock to 1666, but it says to buy 1333/1066? What memory am i supposed to buy? I am goin with the AMD Phenom II X3 710 2.6GHz 3 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 95W Triple-Core Processor. Please help.
If im right here is the memory im going with, G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL8D-4GBHK
One more question, I have a Apevia 500 Watt Java power power supply, will this be enough to run this?

thanks

 

f1r31c3r

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No 500w is not enough you need a minimum of 650w absolute minimum so you should be looking at a 900w++ if your thinking of overclocking.

The faster the clock speed the more the power it uses thats the rule of thumb.

Also this AMD processor is no good if you want to overclock it this technology of silicon can not handle speeds higher than ~3.8ghz its due to the fact that the silicon junctions cant switch tha fast. Hence this is why intel developed the High K gate technology which allows the silicon gates to switch higher than ~4ghz in all fairness high k gate tech can switch at speeds close to 8ghz, again power and thermal design will be your main problem if you choose to go the overclocking route.

Looking at the DDR3 interface, When the memory is being run at full capacity it is power hungry. This in mind the memory will power save when not in use (one of its better new features) yet on process intensive it uses allot of power so overclocking this memory would use more power in an exponetial manor.

DDR3 is said to handle speeds upto 2ghz any faster than this your power curve will just rocket skyward at every mhz increased.

hope this helps make sure you get the best and bigest in power rating if you want to overclock.


f1r31c3r
 

f1r31c3r

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genrally all hardware elements are designed to a certain power spec, yet they are based on the default settings for the component graphics card etc.

If your going to overclock then all them specs are useless. You cant overpower a system provided the PSU is as you say a quality/trusted unit. Yet if you go too small then the PSU wont last very long whatever the manufacturer or quality.

What is great about modern switch mode PSU is there efficiency. if you dont use the power it wont drain it, well apart from the idle power which will be genrally the same for a small psu or a more powerfull psu.

Eg. 95% efficency on 500w is more efficient that 95% on 1000w so the power lost in heat is of course more for 1000w. zippy do a very powerfull PSU and very high efficiency closer to 98%. all depends on what you want really lol.

you also need concider that as system gets older its power drain increases, when you upgrade your system 'add anouther hdd' it all changes etc. Good to always add 30% extra headroom to a design to allow for certain things.
Last but not least lets not forget about start up currents, the nasty power on drain.

As to answer your question huron: Experience in electronics is how we can make the assumption, its easy to generally work it out in ones head easy enough from knowing how and what hardware requires and how it drains power, how it works etc.

That calculator looks good, i would say add a bit more to the end of the calculation after you use it. The calculator does not have a entry for enviromental settings, silicon conducts and drains more power when hotter not to mention runs much faster at higher temps 40'c optimal. To hot = thermal runaway, too could makes silicon an insulator and wont conduct. HDDs use more power at higher temps aswell as noisy enviroments so loud fans, music, tumble dryers etc will cause a change again.
 

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