DDR3 Modules to Near 90% Market Share in 2011

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RazberyBandit

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As if this were a big surprise... Widespread DDR3 use began 2 years ago, and every platform currently used is based upon it.

We'll probably see the same thing in about three years when it comes to DDR4.
 

Tyler-767

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[citation][nom]cobra5000[/nom]I call B.S. on this report.[/citation]

Depending on how you interpret the article I would agree. If you read it "90% market share in 2011", meaning that 90 percent of computers will have ddr3 then I doubt the report. If that were the case then 90 percent of computers would be windows 7 or vista since DDR3 became popular in that era.

If you read it as 90 percent "shipping" market share, then that makes more sense. Tom's didn't do a good job clarifying.
 

AppleBlowsDonkeyBalls

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Shipped units does not equal market share. DDR2 still has a lot more market share than DDR3; that is, it has a higher install base. If you actually think that DDR3 will account for 90% of all Memory in 2011, I'm selling a bridge you might be interested in.

If we were to follow the logic in this article, Windows 7 would have over 90% market share this year, which is absolute BS.

Or maybe it could be that you meant something else and didn't express it right. :thinking:
 

someguynamedmatt

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I'm guessing that they mean that 90% of computers currently being sold are using DDR3 - not 'market share'. Just my opinion... like Tyler said, it has to be the 'shipping share' instead of actual market volume. If they mean what they've said, though, then they're wrong. Period.
 

iam2thecrowe

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[citation][nom]bavman[/nom]Bring on DDR4[/citation]
why ddr4? graphics cards already come equipped with DDR5, i dont see why they cant use this for motherboards. I dont think i have ever seen DDR4 used in anything....it was a jump from ddr3-ddr5 in graphics cards.
 

lee3821

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The graphics numbering system doesn't have anything to do with the normal numbering system for DDR SDRAM. GDDR4 did exist, but wasn't widely used. I think it was only in two cards, ever. GDDR5 is based of DDR3. There is no graphics card using a DDR4-based graphics memory, as DDR4 has yet to enter widespread production, and thus hasn't had time to have a graphics memory standard based off of it.

TLDR The "DDR5" you are talking about is actually DDR3. DDR4 will come, and with it will come GDDR6 or GDDR7. It's a good thing. For gamers, the more relevant point (until more memory bandwidth intensive games come out) is that any GDDR based off DDR4 will allow for more performance than comparable GDDR5, which should help with graphics memory bandwidth bottlenecks.
 

SteelCity1981

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Market share and user share are two diff things. DDR3 may account for 92% of the ram being produced, but the vast majority of your typical computer user still runs DDR2 based systems, because your typical computer user doesn't upgrade to a new pc but on avg every 4+ years.
 

bin1127

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[citation][nom]SteelCity1981[/nom]Market share and user share are two diff things. DDR3 may account for 92% of the ram being produced, but the vast majority of your typical computer user still runs DDR2 based systems, because your typical computer user doesn't upgrade to a new pc but on avg every 4+ years.[/citation]

Yeah, I think the article just meant market share of this year's sales. Or else, DDR1 would still be a big segment of the market.
 

alidan

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i have a question...

how important is ddr3 and 4? i mean on a benchmark for lets say a game, how big a difference will it make?

ram drive, video editing, and a few other take advantage of high speed ram, but average consumer?

what i would love to see instead of ddr4 is a new way ram is put together, and housed on the motherboard.

lets say that a stick pops out twice-4 times as much, and its a 24-32gb ram drive. it has its own power supply like thing, really a battery to keep data stored. it will last about a week while the computer is off, and this drive is really more like a hdd/ssd mirror, because (wiki quote) ddr3 can go 6400 MB/s

imagine this, you right click a program, and you can load it into ram drive as an option, it mirrors every file opened over to the drive and now opening the program is effortless. game load times would sease to exist.

or have it for a os boot.

after a week when the battery dies, it just goes back over to loading from the hdd/ssd

really wish some company would steal my idea... just so it exists.
 

Haserath

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According to IHS iSuppli, DDR3 will account for 89% of a total of 808 million DRAM modules that will be shipped this year
Right there in the article guys.
[citation][nom]iam2thecrowe[/nom]why ddr4? graphics cards already come equipped with DDR5, i dont see why they cant use this for motherboards. I dont think i have ever seen DDR4 used in anything....it was a jump from ddr3-ddr5 in graphics cards.[/citation]
That's GDDR not just DDR, it's a different type of technology.
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]cats_paw[/nom]I dont really see the point of those DDR changes. I belive DDR2 and DDR3 are almost the same in performance...[/citation]

no, in theoretical performance, ddr3 is allot faster, but in real world apps, nothing takes full advantage of that, as in if ddr2 was 100, than ddr3 would be about 150, however in real world applications you would only see about 80-90 on either ram.

the only real way to take advantage of that speed is like i stated above, a ram drive.
 

Graham_71

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[citation][nom]AppleBlowsDonkeyBalls[/nom]If we were to follow the logic in this article, Windows 7 would have over 90% market share this year, which is absolute BS.citation]

Not necessarily. If I were upgrading to a new PC this year it would be new MB+CPU+RAM (DDR3) & vga card. Would keep old HDD & reinstall windows xp

 

zak_mckraken

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Indeed, 90% of the sales of DDR memory will be DDR3 and computers will be shipped with DDR3 memory makes more sense than saying 90% of computers will be using DDR3 memory. I still have only 4GB DDR2-800 and my rig still runs like a charm!
 

f-14

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[citation][nom]cobra5000[/nom]I call B.S. on this report.[/citation]
all you thumbs downers need to learn how to read
that will be shipped this year.
now think on this statement that is nothing more then a fictoral figure based on the fact they aren't making DDR2 any more and the market is down all across the board.
ddr1 still accounts for 12 pct market share.
this study done by this company sounds very manipulated since ddr and ddr2 still account for 30 percent of store sales in memory every day at best buy, microcenter and officemax and office depot. those are actual sales figures real time right now last week, not projections for upcoming quarters that have yet to arrive.
 
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