[SOLVED] dead mobo?

May 8, 2020
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Hello, once again, so I was flashing Bios (ASRock Alive NF6G-VSTA) and from L2.26 to 2.20, dont ask why i just did, and the update was successful so it showed me PASS, i restarted the system using ctrl+alt+del and left the PC be, for like 5 minutes there was just black screen so i decided to turn the pc off by switching the power switch on PSU, and since then i got nothing else but black screen, no beep, no anything, did i brick it? i tried to clear cmos and everything. by the manual, by removing battery, nothing helps
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, then if it INSTRUCTED you to restart, the problem is likely due to flashing an older BIOS version. There may have been something specific to the CPU microcode used in that beta BIOS version that creates problems when going backwards. This is not entirely uncommon and besides which, this is a very old system. At this point, WHY it happened doesn't even really matter. It DID happen, and that is ALL that matters, so you will need to contact ASRock and send the board back to them to be reflashed, which is probably not worth the effort or cost, if you wish to recover the board. I'm not aware of any other method of recovery on that motherboard after a failed flash attempt.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, then if it INSTRUCTED you to restart, the problem is likely due to flashing an older BIOS version. There may have been something specific to the CPU microcode used in that beta BIOS version that creates problems when going backwards. This is not entirely uncommon and besides which, this is a very old system. At this point, WHY it happened doesn't even really matter. It DID happen, and that is ALL that matters, so you will need to contact ASRock and send the board back to them to be reflashed, which is probably not worth the effort or cost, if you wish to recover the board. I'm not aware of any other method of recovery on that motherboard after a failed flash attempt.
 
May 8, 2020
23
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10
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Ok, then if it INSTRUCTED you to restart, the problem is likely due to flashing an older BIOS version. There may have been something specific to the CPU microcode used in that beta BIOS version that creates problems when going backwards. This is not entirely uncommon and besides which, this is a very old system. At this point, WHY it happened doesn't even really matter. It DID happen, and that is ALL that matters, so you will need to contact ASRock and send the board back to them to be reflashed, which is probably not worth the effort or cost, if you wish to recover the board. I'm not aware of any other method of recovery on that motherboard after a failed flash attempt.
oh okay, i tried to get there an older CPU for AM2+ platfrom cuz i had Phenom II X4 965 in this which is AM3 and it didnt help, anyway thanks for help
 
Aug 10, 2020
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Howdy,

Did you use the CMOS jumper to clear the CMOS. The manual is helpful here.:

CLRCMOS1 allows you to clear the data in CMOS. The data in CMOS includes system setup information such as system password, date, time, and system setup parameters. To clear and reset the system parameters to default setup, please turn off the computer and unplug the power cord from the power supply. After waiting for 15 seconds, use a jumper cap to short pin2 and pin3 on CLRCMOS1 for 5 seconds. However, please do not clear the CMOS right after you update the BIOS. If you need to clear the CMOS when you just finish updating the BIOS, you must boot up the system first, and then shut it down before you do the clear-CMOS action.

I'm surprised that rolling back a BIOS causes a catastrophic failure. Was all going fine before you rolled back. Was there something going wrong that made you want to do this?
 
May 8, 2020
23
0
10
0
Howdy,

Did you use the CMOS jumper to clear the CMOS. The manual is helpful here.:

CLRCMOS1 allows you to clear the data in CMOS. The data in CMOS includes system setup information such as system password, date, time, and system setup parameters. To clear and reset the system parameters to default setup, please turn off the computer and unplug the power cord from the power supply. After waiting for 15 seconds, use a jumper cap to short pin2 and pin3 on CLRCMOS1 for 5 seconds. However, please do not clear the CMOS right after you update the BIOS. If you need to clear the CMOS when you just finish updating the BIOS, you must boot up the system first, and then shut it down before you do the clear-CMOS action.

I'm surprised that rolling back a BIOS causes a catastrophic failure. Was all going fine before you rolled back. Was there something going wrong that made you want to do this?
yes i tried, now i tried it twice to be sure but no change, and i wanted it cuz it told me that i i had something bad with mac address and the tool for solving this wasnt even recognizing my mobo and it was beta version bios so i thought thats the problem...
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'm surprised that rolling back a BIOS causes a catastrophic failure. Was all going fine before you rolled back. Was there something going wrong that made you want to do this?
Rolling back the BIOS version on modern boards, from the last six years or so, are usually, mostly, not problematic. Rolling back the BIOS version from much older motherboards was OFTEN problematic, especially if hardware had been upgraded or was newer than when the BIOS version was rolled back to, but even just in general, motherboards often did not like to be rolled back to earlier versions back in the day. In fact, we really recommended against flashing the BIOS at ALL most of the time in the old days unless you had a problem that couldn't otherwise be resolved and was directly addressed in a newer version. So, really, this could be, and could also not be, all that surprising.

It could also simply be an age related issue. If the problems that were occurring that incited you to be messing with the BIOS in the first place were due to an actual problem with the motherboard beginning to fail, this might simply have pushed it over the edge.
 

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