Question Decision Time --- Replace CPU or buy new monitor?

Jan 21, 2020
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So i really need an answer to this. I have recently been experiencing boot loop problems my pc due to me overclocking my cpu to 3.9 on stock cooler. I fixed it the first time it happened by resetting the cmos and bringing the speed down to normal and i have not touched it ever since. It has just now recently boot looped again and i have once again fixed it. Now its decision time. I have been planning on buying a new 144hz monitor and i have enough money for it now. But i have been told by many to replace my cpu. Should i replace my cpu and see if it fixes the problem with my boot loops or buy a new monitor?

Pc Parts:
cpu: ryzen 3 2200g
motherboard: Asus prime b450m-a
ram: Corsair (2x8) 3000 frequency
gpu: XFX Rx 570 8Gb OC
psu: Evga 500 BR
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Starting point is to identify the problem.

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and even informational event that precede or correspond with the boot loops.

If nothing found, stop overclocking and determine if the pc stabilizes.

Use Task Manager, Resource Monitor, Process Explorer, and Process Monitor to observe system performance. The objective being to identify some set of circumstances that result in the boot loop. (One tool at a time.)

Then, as necessary start ramping up on the overclocking while changing nothing else. You may discover some threshold value or configuration that results in the boot loops re-occurrence.

Be methodical and keep notes. Unlikely that a new monitor will solve the problem.

Another thought. How old is that PSU? It may no longer be up to the task of supporting your pc. Total up the pc's wattage requirements and add 25%. Use the GPU's recommended PSU wattage value in the total.
 
Reactions: King_V

King_V

Distinguished
Another thought. How old is that PSU? It may no longer be up to the task of supporting your pc. Total up the pc's wattage requirements and add 25%. Use the GPU's recommended PSU wattage value in the total.
I agree on this - while your system is not particularly power-hungry, the EVGA BR power supplies (among other models) are not particularly good. Age will make that even worse.
 
Jan 21, 2020
11
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10
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I agree on this - while your system is not particularly power-hungry, the EVGA BR power supplies (among other models) are not particularly good. Age will make that even worse.
Starting point is to identify the problem.

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and even informational event that precede or correspond with the boot loops.

If nothing found, stop overclocking and determine if the pc stabilizes.

Use Task Manager, Resource Monitor, Process Explorer, and Process Monitor to observe system performance. The objective being to identify some set of circumstances that result in the boot loop. (One tool at a time.)

Then, as necessary start ramping up on the overclocking while changing nothing else. You may discover some threshold value or configuration that results in the boot loops re-occurrence.

Be methodical and keep notes. Unlikely that a new monitor will solve the problem.

Another thought. How old is that PSU? It may no longer be up to the task of supporting your pc. Total up the pc's wattage requirements and add 25%. Use the GPU's recommended PSU wattage value in the total.
the PSU is only like 5-6 months old. i bought and built everything in the pc at the same time. i have tried resetting the cmos by the battery on the mobo and the pins on the mobo. they would work and i would boot up and everything wouldn’t seem fine, but if i were to put the pc to sleep it would just shut down and boot loop again. also i am buying a new cpu and replacing it in like a week. should i commit or should i buy something different. from what i know, the cpu should be the only problem right? everyone i know irl and on here said that the motherboard should not be the problem. Just to restate, it is booting up and everything is spinning for a solid 5 seconds then everything shuts down again
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
A PSU that is only 5-6 months old should work. As should any product that we purchase.

Unfortunately for any number of reasons a product may not continue working within some reasonable time span.

That is why manufacturer's offer warranties. There does need to be some measure of fairness with respect to the quality of design, components, assembly, and testing.

On the other hand any product that is truly durable and lasts a long time represents a revenue loss for the manufacturer.

So we get designed-in EOL (End of Life), low tolerances, and other circumstances that if exceeded either way will kill the product.

Poor design, sloppy documentation, and general "blame the end user" tactics also ensure that products fail (one way or another) forcing the purchase of a replacement.

You have the option to do many things. However, my recommendation is to delve deeper to identify the problem.

E.g., PSU:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158
 
Jan 21, 2020
11
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i tr
A PSU that is only 5-6 months old should work. As should any product that we purchase.

Unfortunately for any number of reasons a product may not continue working within some reasonable time span.

That is why manufacturer's offer warranties. There does need to be some measure of fairness with respect to the quality of design, components, assembly, and testing.

On the other hand any product that is truly durable and lasts a long time represents a revenue loss for the manufacturer.

So we get designed-in EOL (End of Life), low tolerances, and other circumstances that if exceeded either way will kill the product.

Poor design, sloppy documentation, and general "blame the end user" tactics also ensure that products fail (one way or another) forcing the purchase of a replacement.

You have the option to do many things. However, my recommendation is to delve deeper to identify the problem.

E.g., PSU:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158
i truly do appreciate all the help you are giving me but i don’t think it’s the psu. i got the pc working again by resetting the cmos and i checked my cpu shiz. i guess i went up on the voltage a bit to 1.4 with 3.7 clock speed. i turned it down to 1.35 and made sure it’s the base clock of 3.5 and when it said to reset the pc, it went to a boot loop again. i think it’s just a dead cpu cause when it turned on, everything was working perfectly other than my cpu. i tried to play apex legends to test it and it stuttered a bit. the stuttering could be the gpu but when i checked on it while i was playing everything was working perfectly and was smooth for the most part. it was just certain times it would just stop. i’m getting a new cpu and i’m gonna test if it’s the cpu, until then i just have to wait.
 

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