[SOLVED] Deep learning on how a PSU works ?

Aug 8, 2021
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Hi,

To be honest, i just watch this video from Youtube (BTW im Indonesian)


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFACA56vV1U

and after watching that I have some questions about it:

1. At 5:27, he said "TDP is maximum power at base clock". My question is, does a processor like the Pentium G6405 that doesn't have a turbo clock have a pure maximum power consumption of 65w?

2. Is it true that when you turn on the computer, the psu will draw a lot of power and can even approach the maximum power of the psu? And does it apply to all psu?

3. Under what conditions, a cheap psu that doesn't have good quality and protection can be safe to use and last for years?

4. Do you agree statement that say "80+ certification does not determine psu quality and durability"

Thank you for responding, hope you have a great day
 

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

Here's some answers:

1. The pentium G6405 is a 58w CPU, and doesn't exceed that value at it's base frequency.

2. Whilst there is some power usage during start up, it wouldn't typically get to a level that would push a PSU in terms of high wattage usage. IMO, at start up it wouldn't draw anywhere near max power, maybe 50% load. But it would instantly go down once PC starts to idle.

3. That's a tough question. Ideally with underpowered hardware to keep power draw lower, no overclockig components, and average usage might let a bad PSU last longer. However, the caveat is, that with lower end components, some PSU can go up in a ball of smoke at any time, and potentially take some hardware with it.

4. Yes, this is very true. 80+ Certification, only means the unit itself can hit the low target of 80%+ efficiency at a certain load level (eg 25%, 50%, 100%) A bad unit can still hit these numbers, but with bad components, are not reliable at all. And pushing a bad unit hard, will be a recipe for disaster.
 

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

Here's some answers:

1. The pentium G6405 is a 58w CPU, and doesn't exceed that value at it's base frequency.

2. Whilst there is some power usage during start up, it wouldn't typically get to a level that would push a PSU in terms of high wattage usage. IMO, at start up it wouldn't draw anywhere near max power, maybe 50% load. But it would instantly go down once PC starts to idle.

3. That's a tough question. Ideally with underpowered hardware to keep power draw lower, no overclockig components, and average usage might let a bad PSU last longer. However, the caveat is, that with lower end components, some PSU can go up in a ball of smoke at any time, and potentially take some hardware with it.

4. Yes, this is very true. 80+ Certification, only means the unit itself can hit the low target of 80%+ efficiency at a certain load level (eg 25%, 50%, 100%) A bad unit can still hit these numbers, but with bad components, are not reliable at all. And pushing a bad unit hard, will be a recipe for disaster.
 
Aug 8, 2021
15
0
10
0
Hey there,

Here's some answers:

1. The pentium G6405 is a 58w CPU, and doesn't exceed that value at it's base frequency.

2. Whilst there is some power usage during start up, it wouldn't typically get to a level that would push a PSU in terms of high wattage usage. IMO, at start up it wouldn't draw anywhere near max power, maybe 50% load. But it would instantly go down once PC starts to idle.

3. That's a tough question. Ideally with underpowered hardware to keep power draw lower, no overclockig components, and average usage might let a bad PSU last longer. However, the caveat is, that with lower end components, some PSU can go up in a ball of smoke at any time, and potentially take some hardware with it.

4. Yes, this is very true. 80+ Certification, only means the unit itself can hit the low target of 80%+ efficiency at a certain load level (eg 25%, 50%, 100%) A bad unit can still hit these numbers, but with bad components, are not reliable at all. And pushing a bad unit hard, will be a recipe for disaster.
Number 2, you say it's around 50% load.
For 500w PSU it will be 250w
And for 1000w PSU it will be 500w
But the hardware might doesn't need that much power
 

AntonyLovric

Distinguished
Aug 4, 2014
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18,890
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1. TDP can be exceeded actually. (for short periods of time: Thermal Design Power (TDP) in Intel® Processors ) Older processors would consume more power as they heated up but newer processors will throttle.

2.When you power a system up, everything starts at generally at the same time (drives, fans, etc.,) and most fans will start at 100% as a diagnostic. So the PSU will draw more than idle but not as much as when it's maxed out.
 
Reactions: DiabloDizzy
Aug 8, 2021
15
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Now i got it
So can i say, the psu draw lot of power when start up, but that power let's just say it around 50% LOAD OF THE HARDWARE because all of the hardware is turned on and one of them probably reach their high load and NOT THE PSU?
 
Aug 8, 2021
15
0
10
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Or how about this,
Which is better :
  1. Cheap 80+'ed psu (propably it's fake) the brand is unknown and doesn't have any protection, or
  2. Cheap pure (not 80+) psu that from famous and clear brand and it has some protection
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Or how about this,
Which is better :
  1. Cheap 80+'ed psu (propably it's fake) the brand is unknown and doesn't have any protection, or
  2. Cheap pure (not 80+) psu that from famous and clear brand and it has some protection
Probably NEITHER. "Cheap" and power supply are best not used in the same sentence. The power supply is the foundation of a stable build. If you want a stable PC, spend the few extra $$$ for a quality power supply that has been reviewed somewhere.
 
Jun 5, 2021
21
5
15
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Or how about this,
Which is better :
  1. Cheap 80+'ed psu (propably it's fake) the brand is unknown and doesn't have any protection, or
  2. Cheap pure (not 80+) psu that from famous and clear brand and it has some protection
I should also point out that an 80+ label is not a certification of the overall quality of a PSU, nor should it be treated as such. The requirements for an 80+ certification are to pass a threshold of efficiency at 3 different load levels. It does not include any requirements for having working protections or not exploding.
It really depends on the unit in question. There are some 80+ white-rated units that are better than some 80+ gold-rated units. I'll take an MWE White V2 over a Gigabyte P750GM any day.
 
Reactions: DiabloDizzy
Hi,

To be honest, i just watch this video from Youtube (BTW im Indonesian)


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFACA56vV1U

and after watching that I have some questions about it:

1. At 5:27, he said "TDP is maximum power at base clock". My question is, does a processor like the Pentium G6405 that doesn't have a turbo clock have a pure maximum power consumption of 65w?

2. Is it true that when you turn on the computer, the psu will draw a lot of power and can even approach the maximum power of the psu? And does it apply to all psu?

3. Under what conditions, a cheap psu that doesn't have good quality and protection can be safe to use and last for years?

4. Do you agree statement that say "80+ certification does not determine psu quality and durability"

Thank you for responding, hope you have a great day
1. TDP for AMD nd intel CPUs have very different definition... For intel it's max power draw with Turbo Disabled.. (still your pentium can suck like 80 watts for some time)

2. It's very different scene.. High end PCs. With multiple GPUs and high end CPUs usually do suck more Power even more than PSUs rating.. (again it dependents upon Configuration)

3. Avoid Any Cheap PSU (don't even buy Without-APFC PSU). (APFC PSUs are somewhat build nicely)

4.Yes.. 80+ certificate doens't tell anything about stability and reliability..

I will say.. if you have Electronics knowledge..dig deep into PSU. Take its cover out.. and understand it's circuit.. to select best one.. (watch Diodegonewild's Video on How a Computer PSU works)...
 
Reactions: DiabloDizzy

Vic 40

Titan
Ambassador
The TDP is also dependent on the cooling solution, so with AMD and Intels stock cooler in mind. And yes i know some of the cpu's don't come with a stock cooler at which time it comes to you to determine what cooling solution is best for the cpu you have and why most cooler manufacturers have a max tdp rating for their respective coolers.
 
Reactions: DiabloDizzy
1. At 5:27, he said "TDP is maximum power at base clock". My question is, does a processor like the Pentium G6405 that doesn't have a turbo clock have a pure maximum power consumption of 65w?

2. Is it true that when you turn on the computer, the psu will draw a lot of power and can even approach the maximum power of the psu? And does it apply to all psu?

3. Under what conditions, a cheap psu that doesn't have good quality and protection can be safe to use and last for years?

4. Do you agree statement that say "80+ certification does not determine psu quality and durability"

Thank you for responding, hope you have a great day
1. I guess they're talking about component TDP as a means to determine the total power of your PC based on adding up the TDP of all of the parts. While this is commonly done, it gives you a pretty high number in the end as it's not likely that all parts will consume TDP at the same time.

2. Yes. There is a bulk cap that needs to be fully charged. If the PSU is left plugged in and turned on, the bulk cap holds it's charge as +5VSB is always live. But for those that constantly turn their PSUs off and on all of the time, you're constantly creating that "in rush" of current to charge the capacitor. That's why many people that do this report seeing flashes of light (electricity) or hearing static or crackling noises (also electricity).

3. Actually, never. It could last for years. And then die. And then kill all of your other parts. :D It's like driving without a seat belt. Yeah.. you can do it. You can do it for years. And then that ONE GUY pulls out in front of you and you go through the windshield. Now you're dead. But hey... at least you got to drive without a seatbelt for years!

4. 80 PLUS is absolutely, positively NOT a sign of quality. 80 PLUS has ONE PURPOSE and ONE PURPOSE ONLY and that's to tell you how efficient a PSU is. And by efficient, that just means how much power is wasted as heat when converting from AC to DC.
 
Reactions: DiabloDizzy

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