[SOLVED] Delidded 6700k posted with IHS detatched from die

Robbom

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Mar 13, 2016
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Not sure if using the correct terminology here but essentially I got a reasonable deal on a delidded 6700k, but it appears the IHS (metal part) has moved independently of the die (green part) and is now completely out of line with it. I can assume that during its entire transit this has been happening constantly. Could/would this have damaged the processor and is it wise to get this refunded?
Thanks in advance
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
No, you should do this well away from the computer. Drops of liquid metal are extremely conductive, which is the whole reason for checking to see if any isn't sitting where it should be. Even if the SMD components are sealed, you still don't want the liquid metal sitting on them. Not a lot of people do long term testing of this stuff, and every amalgam is a little different.

Clean up is going to involve, well, not really sure, other then trying to get as much of it as possible off of things. Lintfree microfiber will probably pick it up.

Depends on how much liquid metal is present whether you need to re-apply. You also don't have to use liquid metal, a high end thermal compound will get you, at least, back to normal temperatures. Usually less, since removing the IHS and re-installing it drops the IHS closer to the CPU by quite a bit.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
The green part is the substrate/package. The die is the CPU itself.

Visual inspection would be the easiest, but if it was liquid metal that might get messy, and you would need more. If it is normal thermal compound under there, then you can just see if there are signs of physical damage.

It could work just fine if you re-center the IHS, but I wouldn't turn it on without looking.
 

Robbom

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Thanks for the reply, messaged the eBay seller and he says it's liquid metal and that he never glued the IHS down but insists that repositioning it should be fine and as im unfamiliar with the delidding process and dont own any liquid metal I'm inclined to agree with him. The processor was in its original packaging and this was then bubble wrapped so I don't think IHS could've moved too much inside in its plastic slot. Do you think I still need to check for damage?

The green part is the substrate/package. The die is the CPU itself.

Visual inspection would be the easiest, but if it was liquid metal that might get messy, and you would need more. If it is normal thermal compound under there, then you can just see if there are signs of physical damage.

It could work just fine if you re-center the IHS, but I wouldn't turn it on without looking.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I would be more worried about liquid metal having leaked out. It obviously got warm enough during transit to liquify (just above room temperature). So the metal may not be where it is supposed to be. If done properly they will have sealed the surface mount components. But that doesn't mean the metal has stayed put. If there is a gap anywhere between the IHS and the CPU die that part of the CPU could overheat.

It should be a simple matter to pull off the IHS. The liquid metal should more or less stick together. You can hold the chip in your hand for a while to soften it before making the attempt.
 

Robbom

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Mar 13, 2016
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Right ok makes sense, so I'm simply removing the IHS and checking the liquid metal hasn't leaked/has coverage of the die then reseating the IHS. I assume I can/should do this while the CPU is in socket then? Also if there is any leakage what are my steps to deal with it and do I need to buy extra iquid metal in preparation. Cheers

I would be more worried about liquid metal having leaked out. It obviously got warm enough during transit to liquify (just above room temperature). So the metal may not be where it is supposed to be. If done properly they will have sealed the surface mount components. But that doesn't mean the metal has stayed put. If there is a gap anywhere between the IHS and the CPU die that part of the CPU could overheat.

It should be a simple matter to pull off the IHS. The liquid metal should more or less stick together. You can hold the chip in your hand for a while to soften it before making the attempt.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
No, you should do this well away from the computer. Drops of liquid metal are extremely conductive, which is the whole reason for checking to see if any isn't sitting where it should be. Even if the SMD components are sealed, you still don't want the liquid metal sitting on them. Not a lot of people do long term testing of this stuff, and every amalgam is a little different.

Clean up is going to involve, well, not really sure, other then trying to get as much of it as possible off of things. Lintfree microfiber will probably pick it up.

Depends on how much liquid metal is present whether you need to re-apply. You also don't have to use liquid metal, a high end thermal compound will get you, at least, back to normal temperatures. Usually less, since removing the IHS and re-installing it drops the IHS closer to the CPU by quite a bit.
 

Robbom

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Mar 13, 2016
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Ok thanks, hopefully it goes well!

No, you should do this well away from the computer. Drops of liquid metal are extremely conductive, which is the whole reason for checking to see if any isn't sitting where it should be. Even if the SMD components are sealed, you still don't want the liquid metal sitting on them. Not a lot of people do long term testing of this stuff, and every amalgam is a little different.

Clean up is going to involve, well, not really sure, other then trying to get as much of it as possible off of things. Lintfree microfiber will probably pick it up.

Depends on how much liquid metal is present whether you need to re-apply. You also don't have to use liquid metal, a high end thermal compound will get you, at least, back to normal temperatures. Usually less, since removing the IHS and re-installing it drops the IHS closer to the CPU by quite a bit.
 

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