Dell,gateway etc.. never choose AMD why?

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AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
offer desktops with AMD cpus. I seriously doubt people buy off the
shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.

Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
etc.. do not seem to follow. Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
How is the DOJ not even investigating this?
 
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> jdobb2001 <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

Gateway has sold AMD-based PCs in the past (their
"Gateway Select" line). And now that Gateway owns
eMachines, they are once again openly selling AMD.

Dell, on the other hand ... supposedly has a deal
with Intel that ensures that Dell can match the
price-performance of competitors using AMD.

Of course, with Intel being off their game in raw
performance, no price break can get many enthusiast
dudes to go Dell these days.

The DELL-INTC deal is apt to entirely implode if Dell
begin openly offering AMD CPUs - Dell would suddenly
lose the huge price break.

Dell's business and product mix might have to radically
change overnight, on the day that they put the first
AMD-based PC on their web site.

The Dell-INTC deal may well be a "deadly embrace"
at this point. If Dell adopts AMD, it may be seen as
more revealing about Intel's problems than about the
state of Dell's customer demands.

--
Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
 
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Hi,
My name is Bob Russels. I am a recent graduate of Harvard
Business School, and I have decided to start my own computer
manufacturing business, and go head to head with dell. We
would like some input from the public about what improvments could be
made in the pc business. We are welcome to any suggestions or
complaints. Every single suggestion will be looked out and evaluated.
Please send any information to compr87@yahoo.com.
 
G

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jdobb2001 wrote:
> AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
> offer desktops with AMD cpus. I seriously doubt people buy off the
> shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
> products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.

Gateway *does* sell AMD-based systems now, through its Emachines
subsidiary brand mostly. You can even buy AMD-based notebooks through them.

Also HP (through both HP and Compaq) sell AMD-based desktops and notebooks.

Nobody I know of yet, advertises AMD very much on TV. Even the ones who
sell AMD products only advertise their Intel products. That's mainly due
to the Intel-Inside campaign. AMD has nothing similar.

> Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
> etc.. do not seem to follow. Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
> if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
> How is the DOJ not even investigating this?

You sound like you think that the DOJ actually is working to benefit you
as a consumer? :)

Yousuf Khan
 

Ed

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On 19 Dec 2004 08:31:40 -0800, "jdobb2001" <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

>AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
>offer desktops with AMD cpus. I seriously doubt people buy off the
>shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
>products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.
>
>Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
>etc.. do not seem to follow. Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
>if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
>How is the DOJ not even investigating this?

Cutting the pipeline to Dell would just hurt Intel's bottom line, who's
going to buy that inventory?

btw, about 3 weeks ago I noticed BestBuy had an ad on the cover for a
Gateway PC (not a E-Machines) with AMD inside, so I guess the "Gateway"
brand (or just re-badged e-machines?) are back in the AMD camp.

Ed
 
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On 19 Dec 2004 08:31:40 -0800, "jdobb2001" <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
>offer desktops with AMD cpus.

One thing to remember is that Dell does not pay anywhere near the same
price for their processors as you or I would. At a rough guess, I
would say that the low-end Intel Celeron and P4 chips are being sold
to Dell in the $40-$60 range, while they sell at retail for somewhere
around $100-$200. So, where if you or I were to buy these chips, AMD
might work out to easily be $30 or $50 cheaper, for Dell the
difference is more like $5.


Consider that you can configure out near-identical systems between a
Dell Dimension 3000 with a 3.0GHz P4 with 800MT/s bus speed or an HP
Pavilion a810e with a (much slower) AMD Sempron 3000+ processor and
they work out to the same price. For the fairly basic config I tested
I got the Dell at $548 before a $40 mail-in rebate and the HP at $580
before a $50 mail-in rebate, though small tweaks in configuration
could push it one way or the other.

Now part of the reason for this is that Dell's cost-structure is lower
than HP's, but a major reason for that is that Dell has far fewer
differences between their various systems at least in part due to
using only Intel processors.

> I seriously doubt people buy off the
>shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
>products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.
>
>Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
>etc.. do not seem to follow.

64-bit probably isn't a huge selling feature just yet, especially
given that there is no 64-bit Windows available (in a non-beta form at
least) for AMD's chips yet.

> Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
>if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
>How is the DOJ not even investigating this?

DOJ *HAS* investigated this, and they found that Intel is doing
absolutely nothing wrong. The EU's version of the DOJ is currently
investigating as well and they are a bit more skeptical, but nothing
has come of it as yet.


Really you have to look at Dell's business model to understand some of
this. Dell survives entirely on minimum inventory and just-in-time
shipments of parts. While on the front they claim to offer the most
customizable systems out there, in reality they are all about
minimizing customizations. They can't custom-assemble every system
for every user that comes along, so they just take a guess at what
will be purchased and assemble systems that way.

A key part of this process means minimizing the motherboards used.
Motherboards are the key to an OEM design. Where a different
processor or different amount of memory can be just dropped in without
a thought, a different motherboard means a TOTALLY new system where
you have to re-validate everything and set up completely different
product lines. This is not just true for Dell, but all big OEMs, any
given model of computer is defined by the motherboard it uses. No
matter how you configure up a Dell Dimension 3000 you always get the
same motherboard.

Now, here's the problem for AMD. To use an AMD processor you need a
different motherboard than for an Intel chip, ie Dell would have to
dedicate at least one entire system to AMD chips. Now Dell only sells
a grand total of 8 different desktop systems, and within those 8 there
are at least a few products which are very similar allowing for some
overlap and maybe even sharing motherboards (ie the Dimension 4700 and
the Optiplex GX280 might share a board or some such thing), greatly
reducing the amount of validation required. For comparison, HPap
currently sells 20 different models of PC. While there is probably a
fair bit of overlap between their Presario, Pavilion and Media Center
PC lines, they still have a lot more configuration options and, as
such, more costs involved with selling these systems than Dell.

So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers (at
the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company for
the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to keep
more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
why Dell sticks to Intel-only.


Of course, this only works for Dell so long as Intel remains at or
near the top in terms of performance. With AMD gaining a bit of an
edge in performance, particularly on the server front, Dell is kind of
backed into a corner.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
 
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Ed wrote:
> btw, about 3 weeks ago I noticed BestBuy had an ad on the cover for a
> Gateway PC (not a E-Machines) with AMD inside, so I guess the "Gateway"
> brand (or just re-badged e-machines?) are back in the AMD camp.

Yeah, I would've assumed they would reserve the Gateway for Intel-only
branding, while Emachines did all things. I'm not sure how they plan to
differentiate their two brands now.

Yousuf Khan
 
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Tony Hill wrote:
> Now, here's the problem for AMD. To use an AMD processor you need a
> different motherboard than for an Intel chip, ie Dell would have to
> dedicate at least one entire system to AMD chips.

I don't know how valid this is. Remember, once upon a time AMD used to
sell processors that were socket-compatible with Intel processors, and
Dell still wouldn't sell AMD at that time, saying that there is not
enough differentiation. First it wants differentiation and then it doesn't.

Also Dell does sell certain numbers of low-volume, but high-margin
systems. Such as Itanium at one time: I know, Dell did have to drop the
Itanium because of slow sales, but it at least still attempted to sell
them before giving up -- it doesn't even give AMD /that/ amount of the
benefit of the doubt. I'm pretty sure an AMD system will at least sell
more units than an Itanium system ... any AMD system!

> So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers (at
> the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company for
> the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to keep
> more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
> why Dell sticks to Intel-only.

Doesn't Dell, sell more than one brand of video card? What about hard
drives? At one time, it may have even sold more than one brand of
printer (before it went into the printer branding business itself).

> Of course, this only works for Dell so long as Intel remains at or
> near the top in terms of performance. With AMD gaining a bit of an
> edge in performance, particularly on the server front, Dell is kind of
> backed into a corner.

The high performance systems wouldn't necessarily be the highest unit
sales systems either. If Dell has no problem selling these low-volume
systems from one supplier, then it shouldn't have trouble selling them
from multiple suppliers. Afterall, in the high-performance segment,
people like a fair bit of customizability.

Yousuf Khan
 
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 19:33:30 -0500, Yousuf Khan <bbbl67@ezrs.com>
wrote:

>Tony Hill wrote:
>> Now, here's the problem for AMD. To use an AMD processor you need a
>> different motherboard than for an Intel chip, ie Dell would have to
>> dedicate at least one entire system to AMD chips.
>
>I don't know how valid this is. Remember, once upon a time AMD used to
>sell processors that were socket-compatible with Intel processors, and
>Dell still wouldn't sell AMD at that time, saying that there is not
>enough differentiation. First it wants differentiation and then it doesn't.

Dell talks the talk but doesn't walk the walk. You have to take
everything that is said by Dell (both the company and the man) with a
LARGE grain of salt in my experience.

>Also Dell does sell certain numbers of low-volume, but high-margin
>systems.

Very few of them.

> Such as Itanium at one time: I know, Dell did have to drop the
>Itanium because of slow sales, but it at least still attempted to sell
>them before giving up -- it doesn't even give AMD /that/ amount of the
>benefit of the doubt. I'm pretty sure an AMD system will at least sell
>more units than an Itanium system ... any AMD system!

Yes, certainly. My only guess here is that there is some STRONG
incentive from Intel on this one, because Dell must be losing a
reasonable chunk of money their Itanium line. My guess is that Intel
is taking this hit, not Dell.

>> So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers (at
>> the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company for
>> the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to keep
>> more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
>> why Dell sticks to Intel-only.
>
>Doesn't Dell, sell more than one brand of video card?

It does, though it sells surprisingly few considering how they claim
to offer so much customization. I counted a grand total of 5
different video cards (6 if you count the integrated video) on the
entire Dimension line-up. The Optiplex line-up adds a few more due to
the multi-head and DVI options, though they remove the high-end gaming
cards.

With AMD processors they could easily require 5 different chips for a
single system just to handle the various speed grades (though
fortunately this is easier than different video cards).

> What about hard drives?

Three companies there, all of which can be used TOTALLY
interchangeably. This is a somewhat of a different situation than AMD
where they could only use the processors in the AMD systems.

Note that there is obviously more too it than meets the eye here.
It's well known that Intel not only gives Dell VERY good deals on
their processors, but also covers a lot of their advertising costs
(any time you hear the Intel jingle on a computer ad, you know that
Intel money is involved somehow). I've heard some rumors that Dell's
entire marketing budget is actually paid for by Intel, and that is
something that AMD hasn't been able to match.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
 
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On 19 Dec 2004 14:41:31 -0800, compr87@yahoo.com wrote:

>Hi,
>My name is Bob Russels. I am a recent graduate of Harvard
>Business School, and I have decided to start my own computer
>manufacturing business, and go head to head with dell. We
>would like some input from the public about what improvments could be
>made in the pc business. We are welcome to any suggestions or
>complaints. Every single suggestion will be looked out and evaluated.
>Please send any information to compr87@yahoo.com.

I'd strongly suggest you find a different line of work.:) First, Dell has
priced it's competitors into the toilet and is in serious danger of
following them itself. Second, they have squeezed suppliers of component
parts -- mbrds, video cards, hard disks, CD-DVDs etc. and yes even CPUs --
on cost to the point that many are teetering on the brink of extinction.

IMHO the PC business is now in a replenish and replace cycle with a period
of 3-4years on average, just like the automobile or the appliance business.
IOW the boom is not coming back.

OTOH if you can come up with a commodity box which "man and his dog" must
have, a sort of computing nerve center for the home, you might be on to
something. So far that is in a process of *slow* evolution and the result
is not likely to really resemble what we currently think of as a "PC"; it's
also not likely to resemble what businesses need to satisfy their
"computing needs".

Rgds, George Macdonald

"Just because they're paranoid doesn't mean you're not psychotic" - Who, me??
 
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"jdobb2001" <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com> writes:

> AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
> offer desktops with AMD cpus. I seriously doubt people buy off the
> shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
> products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.
>
> Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
> etc.. do not seem to follow. Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
> if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
> How is the DOJ not even investigating this?

According to a friend of mine, who work for Dell here in Europe, the
reason that Dell isn't offering AMD based machines is that they don't
have enough customer requests for it to make it worthwhile for them.

Thay may be the honeytongued version of the good prices that Dell get
from Intel, though :)


Kai
--
Kai Harrekilde-Petersen <khp(at)harrekilde(dot)dk>
 

keith

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On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 12:32:24 +0100, Kai Harrekilde-Petersen wrote:

> "jdobb2001" <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com> writes:
>
>> AMD seems to offer more back for the buck but it seems that they never
>> offer desktops with AMD cpus. I seriously doubt people buy off the
>> shelf PC's based on CPU brand since DELL etc.. are now commodity
>> products and they choose on features and price not INTEL or AMD.
>>
>> Selling PC's as 64bit in the Advert will move more product yet DELL
>> etc.. do not seem to follow. Does intel threaten cutting the pipeline
>> if they even think about selling one model line with a non Intel CPU.
>> How is the DOJ not even investigating this?
>
> According to a friend of mine, who work for Dell here in Europe, the
> reason that Dell isn't offering AMD based machines is that they don't
> have enough customer requests for it to make it worthwhile for them.

Ah-CHO<bullshit>OO. Excuse me!

> Thay may be the honeytongued version of the good prices that Dell get
> from Intel, though :)

Ya' think? ...and it's not just the prices, as has been pointed out
elsewhere in this thread. Dell and Intel have a symbiotic relationship
that is predicated on 100% product loyalty.

--
Keith
 
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Tony Hill wrote:
>>Doesn't Dell, sell more than one brand of video card?
>
>
> It does, though it sells surprisingly few considering how they claim
> to offer so much customization. I counted a grand total of 5
> different video cards (6 if you count the integrated video) on the
> entire Dimension line-up. The Optiplex line-up adds a few more due to
> the multi-head and DVI options, though they remove the high-end gaming
> cards.
>
> With AMD processors they could easily require 5 different chips for a
> single system just to handle the various speed grades (though
> fortunately this is easier than different video cards).

5 different chips of what? Chipsets, CPUs, or video chipsets?


Yousuf Khan
 

AJ

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"Tony Hill" <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote in message news:3pvbs0lv55p5244etdb9b9mv212rnr7uen@4ax.com...
> On 19 Dec 2004 08:31:40 -0800, "jdobb2001" <jdobbs2001@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> A key part of this process means minimizing the motherboards used.
> Motherboards are the key to an OEM design. Where a different
> processor or different amount of memory can be just dropped in without
> a thought, a different motherboard means a TOTALLY new system where
> you have to re-validate everything and set up completely different
> product lines. This is not just true for Dell, but all big OEMs, any
> given model of computer is defined by the motherboard it uses. No
> matter how you configure up a Dell Dimension 3000 you always get the
> same motherboard.
>
> Now, here's the problem for AMD. To use an AMD processor you need a
> different motherboard than for an Intel chip, ie Dell would have to
> dedicate at least one entire system to AMD chips. Now Dell only sells
> a grand total of 8 different desktop systems, and within those 8 there
> are at least a few products which are very similar allowing for some
> overlap and maybe even sharing motherboards (ie the Dimension 4700 and
> the Optiplex GX280 might share a board or some such thing), greatly
> reducing the amount of validation required. For comparison, HPap
> currently sells 20 different models of PC. While there is probably a
> fair bit of overlap between their Presario, Pavilion and Media Center
> PC lines, they still have a lot more configuration options and, as
> such, more costs involved with selling these systems than Dell.
>
> So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers (at
> the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company for
> the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to keep
> more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
> why Dell sticks to Intel-only.

You're treading on religious grounds now. I made similar statements
(that reducing the number of configurations and suppliers is key and
that's a major reason why I personally work only with Intel HW) in here
awhile back and got raked over the coals. It really riles up the AMD
marketeers.

AJ
 

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<compr87@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1103496091.863874.169100@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi,
> My name is Bob Russels. I am a recent graduate of Harvard
> Business School, and I have decided to start my own computer
> manufacturing business, and go head to head with dell. We
> would like some input from the public about what improvments could be
> made in the pc business. We are welcome to any suggestions or
> complaints. Every single suggestion will be looked out and evaluated.
> Please send any information to compr87@yahoo.com.

Cut the price points in half for the same products.

(hehe, for starters).

AJ
 
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Yousuf Khan <bbbl67@ezrs.com> wrote in news:b92dneQSTs9ygFvcRVn-
tA@rogers.com:

> Ed wrote:
>> btw, about 3 weeks ago I noticed BestBuy had an ad on the cover for a
>> Gateway PC (not a E-Machines) with AMD inside, so I guess the "Gateway"
>> brand (or just re-badged e-machines?) are back in the AMD camp.
>
> Yeah, I would've assumed they would reserve the Gateway for Intel-only
> branding, while Emachines did all things. I'm not sure how they plan to
> differentiate their two brands now.
>
> Yousuf Khan

How were they differentiated before? (Other than brand name of course.)
 
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 20:16:06 -0500, Yousuf Khan <bbbl67@ezrs.com>
wrote:

>Tony Hill wrote:
>>>Doesn't Dell, sell more than one brand of video card?
>>
>>
>> It does, though it sells surprisingly few considering how they claim
>> to offer so much customization. I counted a grand total of 5
>> different video cards (6 if you count the integrated video) on the
>> entire Dimension line-up. The Optiplex line-up adds a few more due to
>> the multi-head and DVI options, though they remove the high-end gaming
>> cards.
>>
>> With AMD processors they could easily require 5 different chips for a
>> single system just to handle the various speed grades (though
>> fortunately this is easier than different video cards).
>
>5 different chips of what? Chipsets, CPUs, or video chipsets?

Processors. Dell only sells 5 different video cards for all of their
Dimension line, so they only need to stock 5 different parts to
satisfy all their video-card needs. With AMD-based systems they would
probably need at least 3 or 4 parts JUST for the CPU along to satisfy
the various speed grades for the processor. When trying to minimize
the amount of parts on-hand (which is goal #1 at Dell), this is not a
good thing.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
 

mygarbage2000

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On 19 Dec 2004 14:41:31 -0800, compr87@yahoo.com wrote:

>Hi,
>My name is Bob Russels. I am a recent graduate of Harvard
>Business School, and I have decided to start my own computer
>manufacturing business, and go head to head with dell. We
>would like some input from the public about what improvments could be
>made in the pc business. We are welcome to any suggestions or
>complaints. Every single suggestion will be looked out and evaluated.
>Please send any information to compr87@yahoo.com.

That's easy. Outsource manufacturing to China, support to India. Use
the 'efficiencies' extracted from it to beef up sales and marketing.
Come up with an easily recognizable dude as an ad personality. Oh,
yes, avoid AMD like a plague - this will greatly enhance your
relationship with INTC. Voila - you are DULL Computer Co.
 
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On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 00:55:41 GMT, "nobody@nowhere.net"
<mygarbage2000@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On 19 Dec 2004 14:41:31 -0800, compr87@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>>Hi,
>>My name is Bob Russels. I am a recent graduate of Harvard
>>Business School, and I have decided to start my own computer
>>manufacturing business, and go head to head with dell. We
>>would like some input from the public about what improvments could be
>>made in the pc business. We are welcome to any suggestions or
>>complaints. Every single suggestion will be looked out and evaluated.
>>Please send any information to compr87@yahoo.com.
>
>That's easy. Outsource manufacturing to China, support to India. Use
>the 'efficiencies' extracted from it to beef up sales and marketing.
>Come up with an easily recognizable dude as an ad personality. Oh,
>yes, avoid AMD like a plague - this will greatly enhance your
>relationship with INTC. Voila - you are DULL Computer Co.

This pretty much describes HPaq, Dell, Gateway/eMachines, IBM/Lenovo
and.. umm... whoever the heck all makes computers these days.


That being said, if Bob is really serious about starting a computer
company, he REALLY needs to find a niche where Dell and HP just don't
compete.

One niche which definitely is an option is a sort of "luxury"
computer. Think something like a Lexus or a BWM of computers. The
trick here is providing some really high-end quality and really good
support for the very tiny percentage of customers that are willing to
pay for it. The trouble with this niche is that a lot of companies
are already there. Alienware seems to be making a go of it reasonably
well, and others are definitely trying.

Another niche is for the very small and quiet boxes, ideally in
cool-looking cases. No necessarily the fastest machines, but
something that artsy types will want on their desk (assuming they
don't want a Mac :> ). Again, this is a niche that already has some
competitors, though it may still be an option.

Basically the answer here is, to quote the most ridiculously overused
catchphrase in business-speak, to think outside the box. If you try
to go head-to-head against Dell you're going to get creamed. You
don't see new companies starting up with the intention of building
cars for your regular driver for the simple reason that the market is
already over saturated. Same goes for computers, but profit margins
are even thinner here. If you want to build computers, you need to
offer something that no one (or at least few people) are offering.


If I were sufficiently insane to try starting my own computer company,
I would go after the small, low-noise, funky-case, Apple-wannabe
market. There is definitely the demand for such designs and the
technology exists, it's just a matter of putting two and two together
and get a foothold before Dell and HPaq clobber this market. Of
course, I wouldn't do this because I'm not insane... but maybe that's
just me.


Ohh.. and make sure that you offer Linux as a fully supported option
and do things like making Firefox/Thunderbird the default
browser/e-mail program. This will help get armies of Slashdot geeks
to do some marketing for you.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
 
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Tony Hill wrote:
> >> With AMD processors they could easily require 5 different chips
for a
> >> single system just to handle the various speed grades (though
> >> fortunately this is easier than different video cards).
> >
> >5 different chips of what? Chipsets, CPUs, or video chipsets?
>
> Processors. Dell only sells 5 different video cards for all of their
> Dimension line, so they only need to stock 5 different parts to
> satisfy all their video-card needs. With AMD-based systems they
would
> probably need at least 3 or 4 parts JUST for the CPU along to satisfy
> the various speed grades for the processor. When trying to minimize
> the amount of parts on-hand (which is goal #1 at Dell), this is not a
> good thing.

I'm not getting this, why would AMD based systems require /any/
different video cards than Intel based ones?

Yousuf Khan
 
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AJ wrote:
> "Tony Hill" <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:3pvbs0lv55p5244etdb9b9mv212rnr7uen@4ax.com...
> > So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers
(at
> > the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company
for
> > the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to
keep
> > more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
> > why Dell sticks to Intel-only.
>
> You're treading on religious grounds now. I made similar statements
> (that reducing the number of configurations and suppliers is key and
> that's a major reason why I personally work only with Intel HW) in
here
> awhile back and got raked over the coals. It really riles up the AMD
> marketeers.

I wouldn't call it religious arguments, it's just a very logical
question to ask. Is Dell refusing to use AMD processors because of
inventory reasons, or "other" reasons (i.e. incentives from Intel)?
Even Tony had to admit after originally writing the above statement
that Dell says one thing and does another. So minimizing inventory is
not the real reason why Dell does it. And to answer the question about
whether any individual, such as yourself, saves any money by
standadizing on Intel parts, then the answer to that is that you're not
receiving any "Intel Inside" funding. :)

Yousuf Khan
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Tony Hill wrote:
> >> With AMD processors they could easily require 5 different chips
for a
> >> single system just to handle the various speed grades (though
> >> fortunately this is easier than different video cards).
> >
> >5 different chips of what? Chipsets, CPUs, or video chipsets?
>
> Processors. Dell only sells 5 different video cards for all of their
> Dimension line, so they only need to stock 5 different parts to
> satisfy all their video-card needs. With AMD-based systems they
would
> probably need at least 3 or 4 parts JUST for the CPU along to satisfy
> the various speed grades for the processor. When trying to minimize
> the amount of parts on-hand (which is goal #1 at Dell), this is not a
> good thing.

I'm not getting this, why would AMD based systems require /any/
different video cards than Intel based ones?

Yousuf Khan
 
G

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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

John Smithe wrote:
>>Yeah, I would've assumed they would reserve the Gateway for Intel-only
>>branding, while Emachines did all things. I'm not sure how they plan to
>>differentiate their two brands now.
>>
>> Yousuf Khan
>
>
> How were they differentiated before? (Other than brand name of course.)

Well, that's easy, before they were two completely separate companies,
and they competed directly against each other.

Yousuf Khan
 

AJ

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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

"YKhan" <yjkhan@gmail.com> wrote in message news:1103740228.475304.264440@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> AJ wrote:
>> "Tony Hill" <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
> news:3pvbs0lv55p5244etdb9b9mv212rnr7uen@4ax.com...
>> > So, combine that fact, along with the addition of more suppliers
> (at
>> > the very least AMD for the processors and possibly another company
> for
>> > the motherboards), additional support costs involved, the need to
> keep
>> > more spare parts on-hand and you end up with some financial reasons
>> > why Dell sticks to Intel-only.
>>
>> You're treading on religious grounds now. I made similar statements
>> (that reducing the number of configurations and suppliers is key and
>> that's a major reason why I personally work only with Intel HW) in
> here
>> awhile back and got raked over the coals. It really riles up the AMD
>> marketeers.
>
> I wouldn't call it religious arguments, it's just a very logical
> question to ask. Is Dell refusing to use AMD processors because of
> inventory reasons, or "other" reasons (i.e. incentives from Intel)?
> Even Tony had to admit after originally writing the above statement
> that Dell says one thing and does another. So minimizing inventory is
> not the real reason why Dell does it.

It's all the complexity, not just inventory. The more suppliers and parts,
the worse it gets.

> And to answer the question about
> whether any individual, such as yourself, saves any money by
> standadizing on Intel parts, then the answer to that is that you're not
> receiving any "Intel Inside" funding. :)

Well I'm thinking ahead to one day where I may resell PCs I build in a
higher volume (though the issues I have with transitionary technologies
currently in vogue has put a damper on such ideas for me).

AJ