Question Desktop Computer- Should I make shutdown actually restart the uptime counter?

HerbertSherbet

Commendable
Nov 6, 2019
46
5
1,545
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Sorry for the poorly worded title. Right now when I open up Task Manager, go to Performance, and then select CPU my computer has an uptime of 8 hours. This is in spite of how I just turned it on after shutting it down. I was triggered to figure this out after turning on my computer and noticing that it behaved suspiciously similar to how Windows 10 does when you wake it up from sleep mode. I understand that this happens because "Shut Down" is by default a form of Hibernating. Something about how Windows 10 Fast Startup speeds things up by putting the Kernel into hibernation and stores the kernel state. I've read about how to disable it but do not understand the pros and cons. I wouldn't mind learning about it more in depth.

I have a desktop PC with a M.2 SSD main drive and a HDD hard drive for extra storage. It's a fast machine with a Gigabyte motherboard, an Intel CPU, and AMD graphics card. I have 32 GB of RAM. I run 64-bit Windows 10 Pro version 21H1. I can be more specific if requested.

I have a few concerns about the way this is working. My number one concern is long-term stability for casual use (emphasis on casual use, LTSC is not the right fit for me). I simply do not know enough about the advantages and disadvantages about either option. I do not care about the time in seconds it takes to turn on the machine from either off state. There's just a lot of things I don't understand and I've had poor luck researching this for a long time now.

  • Can turning off Fast Start cause more wear and tear to a component long-term? Does having it on cause more wear and tear to a different part of the machine?
  • If I shut down my PC I expect to be able to cut power to it at any time afterwards (I may count to 5 or 10 first). Does having Fast Start on pose any problems?
  • Is there any situation where either would provide a security advantage or disadvantage? What about in terms of data loss?
  • When installing things I may decide to restart my PC even though the program doesn't prompt me to do that. Between "shutting down" with Fast Start enabled, Fast Start disabled, and restarting: how would or could those three options cause a different outcome? I understand this may be a nebulous question but the fact that I don't know the answer to this tells me that I don't know enough about how these three settings could affect the computer.
  • I understand how a high uptime could cause a problem, but is a high uptime caused by this Fast Start "shutdown" going to cause (or at risk of causing) the same kind of problems? I've had an unrelated Windows 10 machine have an uptime of 17+ days due to not manually restarting it over a long period of time.
Thank you.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
If you want to reset the uptime on your OS, you can look into rebooting the system. If your system isn't causing any issues or has encountered an issue, I'd suggest leaving them alone. Also, you have an update pending for your OS, we're currently on version 21H2 for Windows 10. Might also be a good idea to see if your motherboard is pending any BIOS udpates.

As for your specs, always list them like so;
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
Chassis:
OS:
Monitor:
 
Sorry for the poorly worded title. Right now when I open up Task Manager, go to Performance, and then select CPU my computer has an uptime of 8 hours. This is in spite of how I just turned it on after shutting it down. I was triggered to figure this out after turning on my computer and noticing that it behaved suspiciously similar to how Windows 10 does when you wake it up from sleep mode. I understand that this happens because "Shut Down" is by default a form of Hibernating. Something about how Windows 10 Fast Startup speeds things up by putting the Kernel into hibernation and stores the kernel state. I've read about how to disable it but do not understand the pros and cons. I wouldn't mind learning about it more in depth.

I have a desktop PC with a M.2 SSD main drive and a HDD hard drive for extra storage. It's a fast machine with a Gigabyte motherboard, an Intel CPU, and AMD graphics card. I have 32 GB of RAM. I run 64-bit Windows 10 Pro version 21H1. I can be more specific if requested.

I have a few concerns about the way this is working. My number one concern is long-term stability for casual use (emphasis on casual use, LTSC is not the right fit for me). I simply do not know enough about the advantages and disadvantages about either option. I do not care about the time in seconds it takes to turn on the machine from either off state. There's just a lot of things I don't understand and I've had poor luck researching this for a long time now.

  • Can turning off Fast Start cause more wear and tear to a component long-term? Does having it on cause more wear and tear to a different part of the machine?
  • If I shut down my PC I expect to be able to cut power to it at any time afterwards (I may count to 5 or 10 first). Does having Fast Start on pose any problems?
  • Is there any situation where either would provide a security advantage or disadvantage? What about in terms of data loss?
  • When installing things I may decide to restart my PC even though the program doesn't prompt me to do that. Between "shutting down" with Fast Start enabled, Fast Start disabled, and restarting: how would or could those three options cause a different outcome? I understand this may be a nebulous question but the fact that I don't know the answer to this tells me that I don't know enough about how these three settings could affect the computer.
  • I understand how a high uptime could cause a problem, but is a high uptime caused by this Fast Start "shutdown" going to cause (or at risk of causing) the same kind of problems? I've had an unrelated Windows 10 machine have an uptime of 17+ days due to not manually restarting it over a long period of time.
Thank you.
This comes down to how you use the machine.
Personally I don't use fast startup/sleep/hibernate.
When I want to use the machine I turn it on when I'm finished I shut it down.
With a ssd for booting things are quick enough.
 
Reactions: HerbertSherbet

HerbertSherbet

Commendable
Nov 6, 2019
46
5
1,545
3
Thanks for the responses. It sounds like it's minor either way. I'm going to disable it.

If you want to reset the uptime on your OS, you can look into rebooting the system. If your system isn't causing any issues or has encountered an issue, I'd suggest leaving them alone. Also, you have an update pending for your OS, we're currently on version 21H2 for Windows 10. Might also be a good idea to see if your motherboard is pending any BIOS udpates.

As for your specs, always list them like so;
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
Chassis:
OS:
Monitor:
Good catch on that Windows version. I looked at that menu earlier and managed to ignore it. I guess I will check for a BIOS update too since I haven't done that in a long time.
Do my specs really matter here?

You can disable all fast boot/fast startup crap, it is useless for a ssd based machine. just lunch powershell as admin and type "powercfg -h off" it should disable hibernation then you can manually turn off any remaining crap.
I could do that but hibernating could still be useful as a feature in a pinch. I'd rather just turn off Fast Startup so that my computer fully turns off. Going through the settings now... I'm tempted to show Hibernate in the Power menu but I think I should not put it there so I don't accidentally click it.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
Jun 12, 2015
56,557
4,476
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fast startup pointless on an ssd, its more for people with hdd. Its disabled by default on win 11 if it recognises you have an ssd or nvme.

Hibernate isn't a waste, it depends on your usage. I mainly choose it unless I have to unplug PC afterwards. Boot up time the same regardless. I find shutdown is faster on hibernate than if I actually turn PC off.
 
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