[SOLVED] Desktop reports wrong form factor help!

May 18, 2020
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Iv been a long time follower of these forums and Iv browsed them anytime I had questions and they’ve helped many times with many things. Up until now I was able to find the answers to all my questions. This is actually the first time I’ve made an account and this will be my first posting so I apologize if it’s not in the correct place. However with this particular problem I really can’t find anything anywhere.

So basically I have overhauled this entire machine and done a lot of custom work to it and one of the upgrades I did was going from the original 8gb ram to the 16gb Corsair ram I have listed below.

Now what Iv noticed in the process of that upgrade was that my pc reports everything about the ram correctly (speed, size, brand, etc) however it doesn’t report the correct form factor for the ram. It is a desktop so obv the form factor is DIMM. That’s what the modules are, however whenever I look on task manager it shows the modules form factor as SODIMM (laptop memory) which we know can’t be true. So I thought maybe it was just a reporting issue on task managers end so I check in command prompt what the pc thought the memory was. And again it reports it as SODIMM. Now this may just be a reporting/recognizing issue that has no effect on the pc at all. But it raises concern for me that my pc thinks the ram is something that it’s not, and it makes me think that there might be some sort of performance limiting effect caused by the pc thinking it has different form factor ram then it actually does. Maybe the OS manages the different rams differently or is more power conservative with laptop ram. I really don’t know and couldn’t say if the different form factors are handled differently or if there is any difference/performance effect at all. But Id hate to find out that this issue is holding the pc performance back in some weird way.

I’d like to get the reporting issue fixed so that it reports the correct form factor if possible. If that’s not possible I would like to verify that there is no effect on performance because of this issue. I just wanna make sure that everything is working as it should be and that there is no effect on pc or ram performance.

The desktop is a dell xps 8300 running on windows 10 (originally a windows 7 machine) that was built in 2011 and since then has been completely overhauled. Currently it is configured as follows:
ONLY HARDWARE THAT IS ORIGINAL IS THE MOBO, CPU AND CPU COOLER
OEM dell motherboard oy2mrg
OEM I7-2600 3.4ghz 4 core 8 thread (thermal paste replaced with noctua)
16gb DRR3 Corsair vengeance 2x8gb (1600mhz cl9) running @ 1333mhz cl9
Asus Rog strix gtx 1060 “OC” 6gb running overclocked @ 2.1ghz clock and 9.2ghz memory
Samsung 860 evo 1 tb on sata 6gb/s (main OS)
WD black 4 tb on sata 6gb/s (backups)
WD black 2 tb on sata 3gb/s (libraries/data)
Corsair rm850x 850w psu
Usb 3.0 pcie card and 3.5” usb 3.0 front panel
I also cut and installed 140mm front intake fan and 120mm side panel intake fan to fix the lack of airflow in this case. Originally it had just 80mm cpu fan and one 92mm exhaust.

All around I think the pc runs pretty damn good but I would love to get the form factor sorted out and reported correctly if possible. If not possible to get correct and it has no effect on pc performance then I won’t worry about it I guess. i can add photos of anything when I get home from work tonight.
 
I disagree. Modules typically are required to have the manufacturers information by jedec standards, even if the module details is missing.

Also, while hwinfo sometimes may not pick up all the info, especially when being run under a non-admin account, other methods to retrieve the module information should work.

The problem with just the serial number is a lot of fakes now have this information on them and only when you need warranty service do you discover it is a fake when the real manufacturer tells you. By then you are sol. Better to buy the real thing from a real retailer.

The sales of fakes and other illicit goods only provides funds for more corruption and illegal activities--like creating a death virus and releasing it worldwide under the guide of an accident...
 
Your motherboard has P67 chipset. Ram overclocking is not supported.
So, 1333mhz is upper limit for your ram on this board. You can not make it run faster (at rated 1600mhz speed).

Ram form factor identification has no consequences. It doesn't matter in any way.

Probably in upgrade process from windows 7 to windows 10 something has got screwed up with ram form factor identification. If it bothers you so much, you could try clean reinstall of windows 10.
 
May 18, 2020
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I am aware of the chipset limitations and the ram speed. Which is why I posted that it was running @ 1333mhz even though they are 1600mhz modules. I know I can’t overclock it and I didn’t have any intentions on doing that. I’m fine with the stock 1333mhz speeds. I was only concerned about the form factor reporting not the ram speed. I know I’ll never get 1600mhz on this board.

One question I do have related to the ram speed is the timings. Since it’s a 1600mhz cl9 module I always thought that running it at lower speeds technically “underclocking” it would give me better timings. For instance I thought I would have 1333mhz cl8 or something similar since the modules can do cl9 at 1600mhz I don’t full understand why they would still be cl9 at 1333mhz. Is it possible to get ram running at max chipset speed of 1334mhz with a timing lower then cl9?

I just hought it was weird. If I remember correctly the factory ram also stated SODIMM on win 10 task manager. But it just dawned on me that I have another hdd setup in a dock with win 7 installed so I can dual boot win 7 and win 10 on my desktop. So when I get home tonight I will boot win 7 and see if that OS reports correctly.

It’s good to know that the form factor will have no effect on the pc or the way it manages the memory. If anybody else can double confirm that, that would be awesome.

As for the clean install of win 10, I’m assuming your suggesting that based off the idea that I upgraded from win 7 to win 10, but I didn’t. When I bought the new ssd for the machine I decided to switch over to win 10 at that time. So I installed the new ssd did a compete fresh install of win 10 and then copied my data and libraries over and reinstalled all my apps as new. So it was a complete fresh win 10 install with nothing left behind from old win 7.
 
I thought I would have 1333mhz cl8 or something similar since the modules can do cl9 at 1600mhz I don’t full understand why they would still be cl9 at 1333mhz. Is it possible to get ram running at max chipset speed of 1334mhz with a timing lower then cl9?
Does your motherboard even have options in BIOS for changing ram parameters manually?
If not, then SPD table determines, what CL settings will be used.
You can check SPD table with CPU-Z (SPD tab).
 
May 18, 2020
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Does your motherboard even have options in BIOS for changing ram parameters manually?
If not, then SPD table determines, what CL settings will be used.
You can check SPD table with CPU-Z (SPD tab).
No unfortunately it doesn’t. Dell didn’t want me to have any control over my own pc lmao. If you want a real bios you have a buy an Alienware. It displays memory info but no adjustments.

yeah on cpu-z or hwinfo it shows jdec for 1333mhz as 9-9-9-24 and then above it is the xmp profile for 1600mhz and that as well is 9-9-9-24. I just thought with the max rated being 1600mhz cl9 that at 1333mhz it would be lower. But it seems it’s more or less a 1333mhz cl9 module with an overclock profile from intel.

Does anyone know where I can get a 2x8gb ddr3 1333mhz module with timings lower then cl9?
 
Does anyone know where I can get a 2x8gb ddr3 1333mhz module with timings lower then cl9?
The modules being recognized as sodimms ha s no consequence in terms of performance. But since it is not right, it does make one question if the modules are genuine or not. hwinfo will display the actual module model number and you can search that to get a spec sheet on the module to confirm if there is any sodimm relation. Otherwise, I would run memtest and see what it thinks the modules are.

In terms of the faster modules, the improvement would probably be as noticeable as moving from a 2600 to a 2700k:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i7-2600-vs-Intel-i7-2600K-vs-Intel-i7-2700K/1vs868vs881

If it's running great the way it is, just leave it.
 
May 18, 2020
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The modules being recognized as sodimms ha s no consequence in terms of performance. But since it is not right, it does make one question if the modules are genuine or not. hwinfo will display the actual module model number and you can search that to get a spec sheet on the module to confirm if there is any sodimm relation. Otherwise, I would run memtest and see what it thinks the modules are.

In terms of the faster modules, the improvement would probably be as noticeable as moving from a 2600 to a 2700k:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i7-2600-vs-Intel-i7-2600K-vs-Intel-i7-2700K/1vs868vs881

If it's running great the way it is, just leave it.
I guess I don’t really have any way to know for sure if the modules are genuine. I did buy them on amazon. But they did come in Corsair packaging and when I run hwinfo or cpu-z or anything like that it does list them as Corsair with the correct module size speed and timings. Any other way I could verify if they are genuine? When I get home tonight I will pull up what hwinfo says and I will google search the model and see if I can find a spec sheet. If I do find the spec sheet, what exactly do you mean when you say compare them to see if there is sodimm relation?

The memory test you are talking about is that built into hwinfo? Or is that something else you are referring too?

Unfortunately the i7-2600 is the best chip that this board can support. I’m still within my return window on this Corsair ram so if I could find a set of modules with cl7 timings for example, even if the gains are minuscule they are still gains and it’ll prob cost about the same after the return so it would be like free performance. The thing is I never see modules lower then cl9 but if I could find some at cl7 I’d deff switch them out. Plus we all know how it goes. Can never have enough performance ;)
 
I guess I don’t really have any way to know for sure if the modules are genuine. I did buy them on amazon. But they did come in Corsair packaging and when I run hwinfo or cpu-z or anything like that it does list them as Corsair with the correct module size speed and timings. Any other way I could verify if they are genuine? When I get home tonight I will pull up what hwinfo says and I will google search the model and see if I can find a spec sheet. If I do find the spec sheet, what exactly do you mean when you say compare them to see if there is sodimm relation?

The memory test you are talking about is that built into hwinfo? Or is that something else you are referring too?

Unfortunately the i7-2600 is the best chip that this board can support. I’m still within my return window on this Corsair ram so if I could find a set of modules with cl7 timings for example, even if the gains are minuscule they are still gains and it’ll prob cost about the same after the return so it would be like free performance. The thing is I never see modules lower then cl9 but if I could find some at cl7 I’d deff switch them out. Plus we all know how it goes. Can never have enough performance ;)
Gotcha. They sound legit, but even the fakes now come packaged like that. The only way you end up finding out is when one goes bad and you send it in for warranty repair and they tell you it's a fake--but by then you're screwed. :(

On the spec sheet if it's also for the sodimm version maybe they have some microcode that is the same, but otherwise anything that would mention sodimm on the same spec sheet.

If you're in your return window, I'd definitely look. But keep in mind that unless the modules are used, there's a higher chance of them being fakes as the fakers are generally faking older stuff without consequence. It would suck to have fake cl7 that fail in a year vs genuine cl9 that work correctly and have a real warranty imo.
 
May 18, 2020
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It would suck to have fake cl7 that fail in a year vs genuine cl9 that work correctly and have a real warranty imo.
That’s a good point that deff would suck.

So I looked on hwinfo on win 10 and I was supposed to look on win 7. I Booted it and then ended up doing updates and what not and shut it down totally forgetting what I booted it up for in the first place lol. But I’m gunna try and check out what win 7 says tonight.

With all the info I’ve found there is only one thing that I think could maybe possible have something to do with the task manager reporting SODIMM. What I noticed under the different memory specs on hwinfo is that these modules are not considered DIMM modules they are considered and labeled as UDIMM modules or unbuffered DIMM. From my understanding regular DIMM modules are usually unbuffered for the most part as well. What I got out of it is that the only difference is UDIMM is more server grade/rating ram or more of a naming/identifier for server quality ram.

So that left me thinking if windows hardware reporting is so basic that it see‘s a character before DIMM and it automatically assumes it is SODIMM instead of UDIMM. UDIMM simply may not be a reporting option for task manager and it’s confused it into reporting SODIMM.

It doesn’t really matter or bother me. But it’s one of those things where it’s kinda fun to dive in and try to figure out what windows is doing behind the scenes.
 
Your motherboard has P67 chipset. Ram overclocking is not supported.
So, 1333mhz is upper limit for your ram on this board. You can not make it run faster (at rated 1600mhz speed).
The P67 chipset is one of the only two 60 series chipsets that allow for CPU and memory overclocking. If the memory can't be overclocked on the Dell XPS 8300 motherboard, it's because of the Dell bios and not a limitation of the chipset. Dell likely would have locked the overclocking ability, so that inexperienced people don't destroy components.
 
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May 18, 2020
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The P67 chipset is one of the only two 60 series chipsets that allow for CPU and memory overclocking. If the memory can't be overclocked on the Dell XPS 8300 motherboard, it's because of the Dell bios and not a limitation of the chipset. Dell likely would have locked the overclocking ability, so that inexperienced people don't destroy components.
Yes, dell locks you out and they lock you out hardcore. I won’t buy another prebuilt dell strictly because of there bios. I can’t even do anything with the fans or nothing. No fan profiles, the bios doesn’t even show the fans or anything like that. I basically have two options on bios. Ahci/raid and boot order. There is also like 3 settings For virtualization and a few others but those are just <Mod Edit> settings that are set and forget and have nothing to do with performance.

Dells bios is locked so hard that even speed fan has trouble overriding it and giving my software control of my fans. I have to have dell notebook setting checked. Even though I have a desktop. And that opens up two more pwm speeds. I have to use those two speeds initially to get control by putting them to 100%. Anything other then 100% does nothing. But once I put it at 100% the fans will ramp up to 100%. Then I set the two dell pwm speeds to 0% and then I can use the two original pwm speeds to variably control the fan speed from 0-100%. And it’ll maintain software control up until the pc is shutdown or put to sleep. So like that’s a lot of freaking hoops to jump through just so I can have my pc run at realistic temps. Otherwise the dell settings will keep my cpu fan at basically 900rpm all the way to 70c then it goes to 1200 woooo likes that’s gunna do anything on a 80mm 4500rpm fan.
 
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With all the info I’ve found there is only one thing that I think could maybe possible have something to do with the task manager reporting SODIMM. What I noticed under the different memory specs on hwinfo is that these modules are not considered DIMM modules they are considered and labeled as UDIMM modules or unbuffered DIMM. From my understanding regular DIMM modules are usually unbuffered for the most part as well. What I got out of it is that the only difference is UDIMM is more server grade/rating ram or more of a naming/identifier for server quality ram.

So that left me thinking if windows hardware reporting is so basic that it see‘s a character before DIMM and it automatically assumes it is SODIMM instead of UDIMM. UDIMM simply may not be a reporting option for task manager and it’s confused it into reporting SODIMM.

It doesn’t really matter or bother me. But it’s one of those things where it’s kinda fun to dive in and try to figure out what windows is doing behind the scenes.
DIMM refers to Dual Inline Memory Module which is basically describing the module 'package' (there were SIMMs and SIPPs prior to DIMMs). The commonly referred DIMM is actually a UDIMM, optionally referred by a U after the speed, aka PC3-10600U. In addition you have registered, ecc, parity and SODIMMs. Each of these also have a letter, with the sodimm also commonly dropped, aka PC3-10600R, PC3-10600E, PC3-10600S.

The module package type is probably one of those things that is supposed to be correct when hardcoded into the module, and if it is truly wrong, you might just have a fake as I mentioned.
There is also like 3 settings For virtualization and a few others but those are just <Mod Edit> settings...
They aren't if you need those features for advanced computing like virtual machines. ;)
 
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May 18, 2020
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DIMM refers to Dual Inline Memory Module which is basically describing the module 'package' (there were SIMMs and SIPPs prior to DIMMs). The commonly referred DIMM is actually a UDIMM, optionally referred by a U after the speed, aka PC3-10600U. In addition you have registered, ecc, parity and SODIMMs. Each of these also have a letter, with the sodimm also commonly dropped, aka PC3-10600R, PC3-10600E, PC3-10600S.

The module package type is probably one of those things that is supposed to be correct when hardcoded into the module, and if it is truly wrong, you might just have a fake as I mentioned.
They aren't if you need those features for advanced computing like virtual machines. ;)
Yeah you are right. It was just one of the only things i could think of that could cause it. doesnt make much sense why they come up like that. Something tells me the ram isnt up to par somewhere somehow.

I was reading about dual and single rank and what was better and how many modules are better etc. I noticed on hwinfo the ram specs have me a little concerned they may be fakes. There is no serial number or SDRAM manufacturer listed. It also shows the manufacturing date as year:2000 month:0 so that seems pretty sketchy to me. Since i just bought them, they were sold and shipped by amazon but idk.

I just got a set of SODIMM hyper x impact modules for my laptop on amazon and when i look at those ones on hwinfo all that info is filled out and looks accurate. Example: the manufacturing date on those modules is early 2020.

I would upload screen shots of the memory tab in hwinfo but im not sure how to post them lol.
 
I noticed on hwinfo the ram specs have me a little concerned they may be fakes. There is no serial number or SDRAM manufacturer listed. It also shows the manufacturing date as year:2000 month:0 so that seems pretty sketchy to me. Since i just bought them, they were sold and shipped by amazon but idk.
Amazon==fake city. Return them and get some real ones from a place that doesn't have a 'marketplace' where fakes can be sold. Also consider used modules as genuine ddr3 in used condition is more available than in new condition.
 
Yeah you are right. It was just one of the only things i could think of that could cause it. doesnt make much sense why they come up like that. Something tells me the ram isnt up to par somewhere somehow.

I was reading about dual and single rank and what was better and how many modules are better etc. I noticed on hwinfo the ram specs have me a little concerned they may be fakes. There is no serial number or SDRAM manufacturer listed. It also shows the manufacturing date as year:2000 month:0 so that seems pretty sketchy to me. Since i just bought them, they were sold and shipped by amazon but idk.

I just got a set of SODIMM hyper x impact modules for my laptop on amazon and when i look at those ones on hwinfo all that info is filled out and looks accurate. Example: the manufacturing date on those modules is early 2020.

I would upload screen shots of the memory tab in hwinfo but im not sure how to post them lol.
You are way over thinking this. HWInfo doesn't always display all information and not all modules have all the information you are saying is missing. Windows Task Manager reporting the modules as SO-DIMM may just be because of the motherboard or a bug. My Patriot Viper Steel Series DDR4-4000 modules don't have any Manufacturer or date of manufacture information in HWInfo.

You are worrying over nothing important really. The modules you have are working fine at the maximum possible speed for your hardware (1333) and without any issues. The serial number and other relevant information you would need for an RMA will be on the label stickers if you need to RMA with Corsair.

Do not spend more money for new ram, you don't need it.
 
I disagree. Modules typically are required to have the manufacturers information by jedec standards, even if the module details is missing.

Also, while hwinfo sometimes may not pick up all the info, especially when being run under a non-admin account, other methods to retrieve the module information should work.

The problem with just the serial number is a lot of fakes now have this information on them and only when you need warranty service do you discover it is a fake when the real manufacturer tells you. By then you are sol. Better to buy the real thing from a real retailer.

The sales of fakes and other illicit goods only provides funds for more corruption and illegal activities--like creating a death virus and releasing it worldwide under the guide of an accident...
 

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